Category Archives: Leadership Development

Nov 20 2014
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The Legacy of PIN: Keeping the Pipeline Flowing

Bobbie D. Bagley, MS, RN, MPH, CPH, is director of public health and an instructor in the nursing program at Rivier University. She played a key role in the Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) Pipeline Project. Paula Smith, MBA, is director of the Southern New Hampshire Area Health Education Center and is in the doctoral program in education, leadership and learning at Rivier University. She oversaw implementation of the Nursing Quest summer camps, the Diverse Nurse Network, and the Minority Nursing Student Support Program components of the Pipeline Project. 

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As PIN holds its final national meeting this week, the Human Capital Blog is featuring posts from PIN partners about the program’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities. PIN is an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

As New Hampshire becomes increasingly diverse, partners in the state have joined together to promote workforce diversity. These are exciting times. Support from RWJF and other funders provided the opportunity to implement the New Hampshire Nursing Diversity Pipeline Project—a partner-driven effort to increase diversity within the nursing workforce as well as nursing faculty. Lead partners included the Endowment for Health, the New Hampshire Office of Minority Health and Refugee Affairs, the BRINGIT!!! Program (Bringing Refugees, Immigrants and Neighbors, Gently Into Tomorrow—an after school enrichment program), and the Southern New Hampshire Area Health Education Center (AHEC). In addition, this Pipeline Program engaged partners from a variety of organizations in the state, including hospitals, medical practices, youth-serving organizations, middle and high schools, as well as nursing leaders in practice and academia.

In addition, this Pipeline Program engaged partners from a variety of organizations in the state, including hospitals, medical practices, youth-serving organizations, middle and high schools, as well as nursing leaders in practice and academia.

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Nov 20 2014
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The Legacy of PIN: An Urban-Rural Model to Increase the Number of Baccalaureate Nurses

Darlene Curley, MS, RN, FAAN, is executive director of the Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare, which served as the lead foundation for the Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) project, Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses (RIBN).

As PIN holds its final national meeting this week, the Human Capital Blog is featuring posts from PIN partners about the program’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities. PIN is an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

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Darlene Curley

Human Capital Blog: Why did the Jonas Center decide to become a part of PIN? What were your goals for the project?

Darlene Curley: There were three things that were attractive about PIN. First, there was this project itself, which was developing a pathway for associate degree to baccalaureate nurses. That’s critical for building a highly educated workforce and a pipeline for preparing the next generation of faculty. The second reason was the partnership funding model. It related to the Jonas Center’s philosophy that we should be funding projects together with others in nursing, but also in interdisciplinary models for health. The third reason was the process of bringing stakeholders together in regions, which was critical. We knew that if we could bring nurse educators, students and other stakeholders together to work on the RIBN project, that group could stay together and work on other projects that were important to nursing and health care as they came along. The third reason was the process of bringing stakeholders together in regions, which was critical. We knew that if we could bring nurse educators, students and other stakeholders together to work on the RIBN project, that group could stay together and work on other projects that were important to nursing and health care as they came along.

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Nov 3 2014
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Achieving Impossible Dreams

For the 25th anniversary of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP), the Human Capital Blog is publishing scholar profiles, some reprinted from the program’s website. SMDEP is a six-week academic enrichment program that has created a pathway for more than 22,000 participants, opening the doors to life-changing opportunities. Following is a profile of Gloria Sanchez, MD, a member of the 1993 class.

Gloria Sanchez, MD Gloria Sanchez, MD

Can a person thrive in a community ravaged by poverty? Are seemingly impossible dreams attainable?

Gloria Sanchez, MD, grapples with these questions every day, both in her medical practice and while teaching aspiring physicians.

Sanchez is associate program director of the Department of Family Medicine at Harbor–UCLA Medical Center, a publicly funded hospital in Los Angeles. She also oversees UCLA’s PRIME MSIII Primary Care Longitudinal course, which trains medical students to be medical leaders in underserved communities.

The lives of patients Sanchez treats are shaped by social determinants of health—forces that dictate poor health outcomes based on ZIP code more than genetic code. Where you live, work, and play has a profound effect on individual, family, and community health, she says.

“How can someone who doesn’t have a level playing field still attain their goals?” she asks, citing research showing that the stress of social and economic disadvantage contributes to chronic disease. “Poverty can literally change your brain, and your health.”

Noting that Harbor–UCLA Family Medicine’s mission is to advocate for disenfranchised populations, Sanchez says, “That’s why I entered medicine. It may sound impossible, but I’m here to help people attain good health so they can achieve their dreams.”

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Oct 31 2014
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RWJF Milestones, October 2014

The following are among the many honors received recently by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, grantees and alumni:

Linda Aiken, PhD, FAAN, FRCN, RN, has won the Institute of Medicine’s Leinhard Award in recognition of her “rigorous research demonstrating the importance of nursing care and work environments in achieving safe, effective, patient-centered, and affordable health care.” The director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Aiken serves on the National Advisory Committee of the RWJF Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative and is a research manager for the Future of Nursing National Research Agenda.

A number of RWJF Scholars and Fellows were recently elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine:

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Oct 30 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Scapegoating EHRs, Ebola fears, children fighting cancer, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

In an article published in Healthcare IT News, David Blumenthal, MD, MPP, writes that health care providers may be too quick to blame Electronic Health Records (EHR) for medical errors. Blumenthal notes that EHRs are still imperfect and that improvements will take time, but argues: “There is no going back in the electronic health information revolution. No physician or hospital, however loud their complaints, has ever thrown out their EHR and returned to paper. The dissatisfaction with the technology will recede as EHRs improve, and as a new generation of young clinicians, raised in the electronic world, populates our health care system.”  Blumenthal is president of The Commonwealth Fund, former National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, and an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient.

In a blog published by the Washington Post’s “Monkey Cage,” Shana Gadarian, PhD, and her co-author write that Ebola anxiety, while potentially misplaced and harmful, is likely to have an impact on whom Americans trust to handle the disease and what kinds of policies they will support to fight it. The authors have studies society’s reactions to small pox and H1N1 flu. “In general we find that anxiety makes people more supportive of government playing an expansive role in protecting them during a health crisis ... we think our study and the current Ebola outbreak both emphasize that people will rally around experts and increase their support for policies that fight the contagion, even if they hurt civil liberties. Let us hope that the U.S. health system is ultimately worthy of the confidence the public has in it.” Gadarian is an RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumna.

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Oct 23 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: CPR for Ebola patients, freezing women’s eggs, the inevitability of failure, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

The New York Times reports on remarks by medical ethicist Joseph J. Fins, MD, in which he calls for clearer guidance on whether clinicians should administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to Ebola patients whose hearts stop beating. In a commentary published on the Hastings Center Report website, and cited by the Times, Fins argues against administering CPR because of the danger of transmission of the virus to clinicians, the slim likelihood that Ebola patients will recover, and other clinical factors. Fins, an RWJF  Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient, urges a dialogue on the question leading to clear guidelines from hospitals and government officials.

In an article for CNN, Rene Almeling, PhD, and co-authors say that while Apple and Facebook made headlines last week for offering to cover costs for their female employees to freeze their eggs, people should be suspicious of egg-freezing as a “solution.” The technology carries risk and has high rates of failure, they write. “But even if the technology were perfect, the proposal to help women put motherhood on ice so they can focus on their jobs is shortsighted,” they add. “[R]ather than making fundamental changes to the structure of work in our society to accommodate women’s reproductive years, technological optimists reach for an engineering solution. ... Instead, the goal should be to build systems of production that allow us to live our lives without constantly watching the clock.” Almeling is an RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumna.

The consumption of sugar-sweetened soda might be promoting disease independent of its role in obesity, according to a study co-authored by RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumni Belinda Needham, PhD, MA, and David Rehkopf, ScD, MPH. The study shows that telomeres—the protective units of DNA that cap the ends of chromosomes in cells—were shorter in the white blood cells of survey participants who reported drinking more soda, Science Blog reports. Shorter telomeres have been linked to a number of chronic diseases, including heart disease, diabetes and some types of cancer.

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Oct 22 2014
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It’s About More than Money

Heather J. Kelley, MA, is deputy director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Future of Nursing Scholars program.

Healther Kelley Heather Kelley

“Being selected as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Future of Nursing Scholar was such an honor!  I was already excited about starting my PhD program, but this took that excitement to another level.  I wasn't sure what to expect from the boot camp, but it was truly transformative.”  - Laren Riesche, a Future of Nursing Scholar attending the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Riesche was one of the 16 new scholars I was privileged to meet on August 5 and 6 at our program’s first-ever scholars’ event.  In addition to providing financial support to nurses to complete their PhDs in three years, the Future of Nursing Scholars program will also provide a series of leadership development activities.  One of these activities is a boot camp which will be held for each cohort prior to the start of their doctoral programs. 

Future of Nursing Scholars Bootcamp Future of Nursing Scholars Boot Camp

The first-ever boot camp was a two-day event at which the scholars were able to meet and connect with one another, and begin the work of developing skills that will serve them well as they pursue their PhDs.  Sessions addressed crucial issues, including developing strategies for peer coaching, and identifying and understanding one’s own approach to change and exerting influence.  The new scholars met with current doctoral students to discuss a variety of issues and were given time to network with program leaders, guest speakers, and each other.  A workshop served as an introduction to scholarly writing and the event closed with a panel on selecting and working with mentors.

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Oct 21 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The October 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research and trends relating to academic progression, leadership and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the October issue.

Campaign Helps Advance Institute of Medicine's Call for More Nurse Leaders
On the fourth anniversary of the release of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) landmark report on the future of the nursing profession, more nurse leaders are stepping into positions of power and influence—and efforts to prepare even more nurses for leadership are gaining ground. Today, the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action is putting new emphasis on the report’s leadership recommendation, and nurses and their employers in government and other sectors are responding. The Campaign is a joint initiative of RWJF and AARP.

Nursing Improvements Could Boost Outcomes for 7 Out of 10 Critically Ill Black Babies
A new study funded by RWJF’s Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative and the National Institute of Nursing Research provides insight into the issue of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, who are disproportionately black. Researchers found that nurse understaffing and practice environments were worse at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, contributing to adverse outcomes for VLBW infants born in those facilities.

California has “Well-Educated” Nurse Force, Study Finds
While California has a “well-educated” nurse force, a survey published by the state’s Board of Registered Nursing shows that there is a long way to go toward meeting the goal set forth by the Institute of Medicine’s landmark report on the future of nursing that 80 percent of nurses hold bachelor’s degrees or higher by 2020. About 60 percent of the state’s registered nurses have earned a bachelor’s or graduate degree in nursing or another field, the survey found. Nearly 40 percent of respondents—and nearly 80 percent of those under 35—said they are considering or seriously considering additional education.

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Oct 20 2014
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Thoughts on Mentoring

For 23 years, Project L/EARN has created stronger candidates for admission to graduate programs. The intensive, 10-week summer internship provides training, experience, and mentoring to undergraduate college students from socioeconomic, ethnic, and cultural groups that traditionally have been underrepresented in graduate education. Project L/EARN is a project of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research, and Rutgers University. In this post, interns and mentors share their insights on the value of mentoring in general, and on Project L/EARN in particular. For more, check out an accompanying Infographic: Project L/EARN: Milestones.

“Project L/EARN mentoring has been incredibly instrumental in my career path and has contributed greatly to my professional success. The program was my first major introduction to research, and helped me to apply and reinforce research methods and statistical analysis skills throughout my undergraduate and graduate years.” — Anuli Uzoaru Njoku, MPH, DrPH, post-doctoral fellow, Fox Chase Cancer Center, 1999 Intern

“Mentoring means allowing me to experience how someone else sees me—someone who believes in me and sees my potential, someone who can set my sights higher and in the right direction.” — Tamarie Macon, MS, PhD in progress, University of Michigan, 2006 Intern

“Project L/EARN mentoring, then and now, has been the difference between the summer program being a one-time experience, and the beginning of an educational and professional career that will undoubtedly contribute to the story of my life. The mentoring was the avenue by which my truest potential, of which I had no real awareness, was discovered and cultivated. That cultivation has resulted, and is still resulting, in opportunities and accomplishments that are beyond my imagination.” — David Fakunle, PhD in progress, Johns Hopkins University, 2008 Intern

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Oct 17 2014
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RWJF’s Lavizzo-Mourey, Nursing Grantees Honored by American Academy of Nursing

Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), was honored by the American Academy of Nursing (AAN) yesterday, receiving the President’s Award from the venerable institution.

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The presentation was made by AAN President Diana Mason, PhD, RN, FAAN, at its conference, Transforming Health, Driving Policy Conference. Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, spoke to the assembled conference participants via video. “At the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, we like to say that nursing is in our DNA. That’s because we believe to our core that nurses are the glue that holds together our health care system across the entire continuum of an individual’s lifespan ... We envision a future where all Americans realize a new and robust Culture of Health ... We cannot and we will not ever achieve a Culture of Health without the support, help and the leadership of nurses.”

“I am grateful to be honored with this award,” Lavizzo-Mourey continued. “And know that you are all committed to transforming health, leading change, influencing policy, and ultimately improving the nation’s health ... And I am humbled to be in the company of this year’s FAAN inductees and the Living Legend honorees who will be recognized tonight. Congratulations to everyone – and a shout-out to those who are RWJF scholars, fellows and alumni.”

Some 170 people will be inducted as fellows of AAN (FAANs) tomorrow. They include four RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows, eight RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars, two RWJF Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative investigators, and Mary Dickow, MPA, the statewide director of the California Action Coalition of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action.

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