Category Archives: Jobs

Jul 30 2014
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MBA Degrees Give Physicians a Career Boost

Physicians who have both doctor of medicine (MD) and master of business administration (MBA) degrees reported that their dual training had a positive professional impact, according to a study published online by Academic Medicine. The study, one of the first to assess MD/MBA graduates’ perceptions of how their training has affected their careers, focused on physician graduates from the MBA program in health care management at the University of Pennsylvania.

file Mitesh S. Patel

The MD was more often cited as conveying professional credibility, while 40 to 50 percent of respondents said the MBA conveyed leadership, management, and business skills. Respondents also cited multidisciplinary experience and improved communication between the medical and business worlds as benefits of the two degrees.

“Our findings may have significant implications for current and future physician-managers as the landscape of health care continues to change,” lead author Mitesh S. Patel, MD, MBA, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Clinical Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania, said in a news release. “A study published in 2009 found that among 6,500 hospitals in the United States, only 235 were run by physicians. Moving forward, changing dynamics triggered by national health care reform will likely require leaders to have a better balance between clinical care and business savvy. Graduates with MD and MBA training could potentially fill this growing need within the sector.”

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May 30 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The May 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the May issue.

Nursing Job Outlook Sunny

Nursing graduates can take heart from long-term projections that show they have one of the hottest degrees around. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that more than half a million positions for registered nurses (RNs) will open between 2012 and 2022. An additional 525,000 nurses will be needed to replace those leaving the field. However, experts say that regional variations in employment opportunities for nurses should be expected. The outlook is especially good for nurses with bachelor’s degrees in nursing (BSNs) and higher.

Study: Nursing School Diversity Initiatives Mostly Successful

Do “pipeline programs” aimed at increasing student diversity in nursing schools actually work? The answer is ‘Yes...but,’ according to a study led by J. Margo Brooks Carthon, PhD, APRN, an alumnus of the RWJF New Connections program and an RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholar. Her study found that significantly more Latino and Asian students enrolled in nursing schools with pipeline programs than without, but enrollment among Native American and Alaskan Indian students decreased at pipeline schools.

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May 27 2014
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52 Schools of Nursing to Provide 400 Scholarships Through RWJF’s New Careers in Nursing Program

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) today announced awards to 52 schools of nursing that will comprise the final cohort of its prestigious New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program (NCIN). In the upcoming academic year, the schools will use these grants to support traditionally underrepresented students who are making a career switch to nursing through an accelerated baccalaureate or master’s degree program. NCIN is a program of RWJF and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

Each NCIN Scholar has already earned a bachelor’s degree in another field, and is making a transition to nursing through an accelerated nursing degree program, which prepares students to assume the role of  registered nurse in as little as 12-18 months.

In addition to a $10,000 scholarship, NCIN scholars receive other support to help them meet the demands of an accelerated degree program. All NCIN grantee schools maintain leadership and mentoring programs for their scholars, as well as a pre-entry immersion program to help them succeed.

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May 19 2014
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In the Media: New Documentary Brings Nurses to the Big Screen

This is part of the May 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

The work of nursing is often done in private, behind the closed doors of a hospital or health clinic.

But filmmaker Carolyn Jones opens those doors to the public in a new documentary about five registered nurses. Her goal is to shine a light on the hidden work that nurses do, so that viewers have a better understanding of the nursing profession and a deeper appreciation for nurses.

“The public just has no idea what goes on when a nurse walks into the room,” said Jones, a cancer survivor who credits much of her recovery to the nurses who helped her through it. “I really wanted to share that because I thought it was powerful and meaningful.”

The film, called The American Nurse, follows five nurses as they care for patients in diverse settings: rural Appalachia, a nursing home in Wisconsin, a veteran’s health care center in San Diego, a prison in Louisiana, and a maternity ward in Baltimore.

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Feb 25 2014
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Physician Compensation Patterns Pose Challenges to Efforts to Incentivize Changes in How Care Is Delivered

Salary is the most common type of compensation for physicians in non-solo practice settings, many of whom are paid through a blend of methods, according to a new American Medical Association (AMA) Policy Research Perspectives report that says it provides a “rare glimpse” into how non-solo physicians are paid.

Just over 53 percent of non-solo physicians reported that all or most of their compensation came from salary, while nearly 32 percent said all or most of their compensation was based on personal productivity. The report points out that this breakdown “suggests that it may be difficult to align practice-level incentives that encourage judicious use of resources with physician-level incentives that do not.”

Ideally, the report says, financial and other incentives would encourage physicians to make the best care decisions possible for patients, providing them “the right care, in the right place, and at the right time,” but current incentives often do not encourage that approach.

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Jan 30 2014
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Health Care Ranks High, and Often, on ‘Best Jobs’ List

Nearly 40 percent of the country’s 100 most promising employment opportunities are in health care, according to the Best Jobs of 2014 list recently published by U.S. News & World Report.

Although the health care sector dominates the list, it did lose the No. 1 spot (to technology) for the first time since U.S. News launched the annual rankings in 2012. The top 10 jobs include dentist (at No. 3), nurse practitioner (4), pharmacist (5), registered nurse (6), physical therapist (7), physician (8), and dental hygienist (10).

Other health care jobs on the list include occupational therapist, phlebotomist, physical therapy assistant, diagnostic medical sonographer, respiratory therapist, licensed practical and licensed vocational nurse, optician, home health aide, and paramedic.

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Jan 13 2014
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In the Media: The Straight Story about Travel Nursing

This is part of the January 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing's Knowledge.

Travel nursing has gotten some bad press recently thanks to Scrubbing In, a salacious new “reality” show on MTV about a group of young travel nurses in California.

More realistic and less sensational information can be found at The Gypsy Nurse, a blog about travel nursing by Candy Treft, RN, a veteran of the field. It is aimed at nurses who suffer from what she calls “hypertravelosis,” a tongue-in-cheek condition in which nurses have an overactive need and desire to travel. The treatment plan, of course, involves becoming a travel nurse.

Treft was inspired to become a nurse when she found herself unemployed and attempting to support herself and two young children. She decided to become a travel nurse in 2004, and has since worked in 16 states and in Europe. She has also traveled throughout North, Central, and South America.

“I live, work, eat, sleep, and breathe TRAVEL,” she writes on her site.

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Dec 3 2013
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Job Growth in Health Care Looks Healthy, Indeed

More than half of the 50 jobs projected to be the nation's fastest-growing occupations over the next several years are in the health care industry, according to a new report from the human resources company CareerBuilder and its research affiliate, Economic Modeling Specialists International.

Among the 26 health care jobs in the top 50, the ones with growth rates of 15 percent or greater include biomedical engineers, personal care and home health aides, physical therapy and occupational therapy assistants, physical therapy aides, diagnostic medical sonographers, and medical scientists (except epidemiologists).

Read the report, America's Job Outlook: Occupational Projections 2013-2017.
Read coverage of it in Becker's Hospital Review.

Oct 24 2013
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Health Care Job Demand Slows, But Still Growing

The health care sector has created 166,800 new jobs so far this year, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics—but that’s down from the 266,400 new jobs created in the first nine months of 2012. The sector created 6,800 jobs this September, compared with 36,600 in September of last year.

Experts note that these numbers have yet to reflect any slowing demand for physicians and other clinicians.

With health reform taking effect, consolidations and other changes in the health care industry, “what you are seeing is simple action-reaction,” Travis Singleton, senior vice president at the health care staffing firm Merritt Hawkins & Associates, told Health Leaders Media. “[A]nytime you have mass change to an industry you are going to get a reaction.” Singleton says that Merritt Hawkins saw a 14 percent increase in its physician and advanced practice recruiting assignments from 2012 to 2013, and he expects recruitment and hiring to continue to increase, especially in nursing.

See the data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Read the Health Leaders Media story.

Oct 8 2013
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A Culture Where Education Is Valued and Celebrated

Three years ago this week, the Institute of Medicine issued a landmark report, Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. Its recommendations include increasing the proportion of nurses with baccalaureate degrees to 80 percent by 2020. Charleen Tachibana, MN, RN, FAAN, is senior vice president, hospital administrator, and chief nursing officer at Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle, Washington. Tachibana is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Executive Nurse Fellow (2009 – 2012).

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Virginia Mason Medical Center began a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN)-only hiring guideline in the summer of 2012. The change in hiring guidelines for our staff followed a decade of having educational guidelines in place for our nurse leaders. This was a critical step in our success, as our leaders were able to support and understand the need for this change. It’s important for leaders to model lifelong learning, including advancement with formal education. So, last August I also began my Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program.

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The publication of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on the Future of Nursing really provided the momentum to move to another level.  The prominence of this report has made this a relatively easy transition and provided the clarity on why this is critical for our patients and for our profession at this point in time. 

Although we have focused this requirement on new hires, it’s been impressive to see the wave of staff RNs returning to school, many for their master’s or doctorate degrees.

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