Category Archives: Health Leadership, Education, and Training

Oct 14 2014
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Crusader Against Cancer

For the 25th anniversary of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP), the Human Capital Blog is publishing scholar profiles, some reprinted from the program’s website. SMDEP is a six-week academic enrichment program that has created a pathway for more than 22,000 participants, opening the doors to life-changing opportunities. Following is a profile of Jacqueline Barrientos, MD, a member of the 1994 class.

Jacqueline Barrientos Jacqueline Barrientos, MD

As far back as Ancient Egypt, cancer has frustrated medical practice. Papyri written around 1600 BC describe various cases, with one concluding that “there is no treatment.”

But there’s hope for patients diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)—a cancer that attacks the blood and bone marrow—thanks to Jacqueline Barrientos, MD, who isn’t intimidated by the history surrounding the disease.

She’s busy helping to rewrite it.

Barrientos is part of a team researching new CLL therapies at the North Shore-LIJ Cancer Institute’s CLL Research and Treatment Center on Long Island. In clinical trials, the pioneering drug treatments produced unprecedented results—considerably better than those achieved with chemotherapy, and minus the brutal side effects.

“We’ve never seen response rates like this before,” says Barrientos. “It’s astonishing.” When the FDA approved the use of the new treatments earlier this year, she and her team were elated. “We’re giving life to patients who once had no hope of surviving because the cancer was so aggressive.”

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Oct 9 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: The nurse faculty shortage, teaching empathy, a link between overtime and diabetes, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

ABC News explores the nation’s nursing workforce shortage, focusing specifically on the faculty shortage at nursing schools. “Suddenly, we turned around and realized we’re not attracting enough nurses to go into teaching,” said Kimberly Glassman, PhD, RN, chief nursing officer at NYU Langone Medical Center. “The fear is we will have to shrink the number of nurses we can prepare for the future at a time when we need to prepare more.” Glassman is an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellow. The article was republished by Yahoo News and ABC News Radio.

RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus Allison Aiello, PhD, MS, is interviewed for an NBC News story on Enterovirus D-68. She recommends that parents consider getting flu shots for their children, noting that preventing children from getting the flu should help make Enterovirus less complicated to diagnose and treat. The video is available here.

RWJF Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program scholar Paloma Toledo, MD, co-authors a Huffington Post blog entry on the need for medical schools to teach students to be empathetic. Over the course of their training, they become less empathetic, as opposed to more empathetic, and the reasons for this are unclear,” Toledo writes, recommending lectures on active listening and communication skills, among other measures. 

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Oct 3 2014
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Meeting the Needs of Children in Partnership with Nurses and Nurse Practitioners

Sunny G. Hallowell, PhD, APRN, is a postdoctoral fellow, and Danielle Altares Sarik, MSN, APRN, a predoctoral fellow, at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the School of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania. Hallowell is also a Leonard Davis Institute Fellow. Both are pediatric nurse practitioners serving on the executive board of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, Pennsylvania Delaware Valley Chapter. Monday, October 6, is National Child Health Day.

Sunny G. Hallowell Sunny G. Hallowell

Many Americans may not know that children born in the United States are less likely to survive to their fifth birthday than children born in other high-income peer countries. The United States falls at the bottom of the Commonwealth Fund’s recently released “Mirror, Mirror” report, ranking last out of 11 countries for infant mortality.  

As children hold the greatest potential to achieve good health, high infant and child mortality may be particularly surprising.  Early lifestyle and health care decisions can set children on a trajectory that determines their health for a lifetime.  

Danielle Altares Sarik Danielle Altares Sarik

As a country, we can do more to ensure the health of our youngest and most vulnerable population. Using nurses and nurse practitioners (NP) to the highest level of their education and training is one strategy. Robust use of nurses and NPs can offer solutions to improve infant and child survival rates through prenatal, postnatal and early childhood health surveillance. 

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Oct 2 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Autism and birth order, nurse staffing and underweight infants, long-term care insurance, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

There is an increased risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) among children born less than one year or more than five years after the birth of their next oldest sibling, Forbes reports. The study, led by RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumna Keely Cheslack-Postava, PhD, MSPH, analyzed the records of 7,371 children born between 1987 and 2005, using data from the Finnish Prenatal Study of Autism. About a third of the children had been diagnosed with ASD by 2007. Researchers found that the risk of ASD for children born less than 12 months after their prior sibling was 50 percent higher than it was for children born two to five years after their prior sibling. “The theory is that the timing between pregnancies changes the prenatal environment for the developing fetus,” Cheslack-Postava said. 

The health outcomes and quality of care for underweight black infants could greatly improve with more nurses on staff at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, according to a study funded by RWJF’s Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative (INQRI). The study, led by Eileen Lake, PhD, RN, FAAN, found that nurse understaffing and practice environments were worse at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, contributing to adverse outcomes for very low birthweight babies born in those facilities, reports Health Canal. More information is available on the INQRI Blog. The study was covered by Advance Healthcare Network for Nurses, among other outlets.

Because of a “medical-industrial complex” that provides financial incentives to overuse and fragment health care, patients nearing the end of their lives need an advocate to fight for their interests, Joan Teno, MD, MS, writes in an opinion piece for the New York Times. Teno encourages readers to “find a family member or friend who can advocate for the health care that you want and need. Find someone to ask the hard questions: What is your prognosis? What are the benefits and risks of treatments? Find someone not afraid of white coats.” Teno is an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient. 

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Oct 1 2014
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You’re Invited to 'Flipping' the Medical School Classroom

Please join the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) this Friday, October 3 from 12 p.m. – 1 p.m. ET for a First Friday Google+ Hangout. Panelists will discuss a new approach to medical education in which much basic content is delivered online, thus freeing up classroom time for more interactive sessions and learning what really “sticks” with students.

Susan Dentzer, senior policy adviser to the Foundation, will lead the discussion, sharing visions for the present and future of medical education that better serve emerging physicians and patients.  This event is the ninth in the #RWJF1stFri series—a platform to inform RWJF audiences about lessons our partners are learning as we all work to create a Culture of Health.

Speakers will be:

  • Michael Painter, MD, JD, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
  • Charles Prober, MD, Stanford School of Medicine 
  • Rishi Desai, MD, MPH, Khan Academy  
  • Jennifer DeCoste-Lopez, Stanford School of Medicine
  • Shiv Gaglani, Osmosis and Medgadget 

Prior to the Hangout, you can join the conversation and ask questions on Twitter at #RWJF1stFri. RSVP and learn more.  

Sep 25 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Unintended consequences of shorter ER wait times, Ebola response, vaccinations and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

Policies aimed at shortening emergency departments waiting times may have unintended consequences, including unnecessary admission of patients who might be better off being discharged, RWJF Physician Faculty Scholars alumna Renee Hsia, MD, MSc, tells Health Day. Hsia published two research letters in JAMA Internal Medicine on emergency wait times at urban and rural hospitals. RWJF Clinical Scholar alumnus Jeremiah Schuur, MD, MHS, author of an accompanying editorial, seconds Hsia’s concerns. “Medicare started advertising waiting times at ERs about a year ago. And that will be a strong incentive for hospitals to work on and improve their waiting times...[h]owever, some of the hospitals with longer waiting times, like teaching hospitals, care for the most complex patients who often don’t have access to regular care. And these places are, by nature and necessity, going to have longer waiting times,” he warned. The article was republished by U.S. News & World Report and Health.com, among other outlets.

CBS Detroit interviews Howard Markel, MD, PhD, FAAP, recipient of an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research, for a story on President Obama’s decision to send American troops and medical and logistical support to Africa to stop Ebola from spreading. “It is a humanitarian gesture,” Markel said. “I applaud the president for doing it. Do I wish as a physician and an epidemiologist it was done earlier? Yes, of course.” Markel says he does not expect the virus to spread to the United States. He is also quoted in the New Republic and Politico.

In an op-ed for the New York Times, Jason Karlawish, MD, explores the balance between risk-avoidance and enjoying life as we age. Noting that 3.6 percent of the population is 80 or older, he writes that as Americans age, “life is heavily prescribed not only with the behaviors we should avoid, but the medications we ought to take.” Aging in the 21st century is all about risk reduction, but “[w]e desire not simply to pursue life, but happiness” and “medicine is important, but it’s not the only means to this happiness,” Karlawish writes. National investment in communities and services that improve the quality of our aging may be one answer, he adds. Karlawish is a recipient of an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research.

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Sep 23 2014
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Are Simulators as Effective for Nursing Students as Actual Clinical Experience?

In the last 15 years, the availability of high-fidelity simulation has slowly begun to transform the clinical education of the nation’s nursing students. Schools that once relied on the combination of classroom education and hands-on experience in a clinical environment began to mix in time in a simulation lab, where nursing students could work with highly sophisticated mannequins able to display a range of symptoms and react in real-time to treatment.

Such simulation labs offer many advantages to nurse educators, including the ability to replicate a range of patient situations, thus allowing students to practice specific nursing skills without having to practice their budding skills on actual patients.

But how effective are simulators at training the next generation of nurses? That’s a question that the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) has a particular interest in answering, because the state boards it represents are asked with increasing frequency to permit nursing schools to replace on-the-ground clinical time with simulation.

In pursuit of an answer, NCSBN conducted a full-scale study, tracking 666 nursing students for two academic years, beginning in Fall 2011, and then for six months longer as they began their work in the nursing profession. During their nursing school experience, one-quarter of the students had traditional clinical experiences with no simulation, another quarter had 25 percent of their clinical hours replaced by simulation, and the remaining half had 50 percent of their clinical hours replaced by simulation. At various points during their training and subsequent work as nurses, all study participants were assessed for clinical competency and nursing knowledge.

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Sep 16 2014
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Inaugural Cohort of 16 Future of Nursing Scholars Announced

The new Future of Nursing Scholars program has announced its first cohort of 16 nurse scholars who are receiving scholarships and other support as they pursue PhDs in nursing. The students were selected by schools of nursing that have received grants to provide those scholarships.

Each Future of Nursing Scholar will receive financial support, mentoring and leadership development over the three years of her or his PhD program. They are in the initial stages of selecting the topics for their doctoral research, which range from infection control in the elderly population to the impact of stigma on people with mental illness to the quality of life of children with implanted defibrillators.

In addition to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, United Health Foundation, Independence Blue Cross Foundation, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and the Rhode Island Foundation are supporting the Future of Nursing Scholars grants to schools of nursing this year. The program is located at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing.

Read more about the first cohort of Future of Nursing Scholars.

Schools of nursing with research-focused PhD programs can apply to join the program here.

Sep 11 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Mental health and returning service members, children of incarcerated parents, nurse turnover, more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

When reserve service members return to civilian life, such stresses as marriage and health care problems are more likely to trigger drinking problems than traumatic events that occurred during deployment, according to a study reported by Fox News. When it comes to the “long-term mental health for National Guard members, what matters is what happens after they come home,” said lead author Magdalena Cerdá, PhD, MPH, an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumna. “Financial difficulties, re-integrating, difficulties accessing quality health care, all of those seem to matter.” But deployment stress also has an impact. “[T]he more traumatic events they are exposed to during or after combat, the more problems they have in daily life when they come home,” she said. RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient Sandro Galea, MD, MPH, DrPH, co-authored the study. Health Canal also reported on it.

An estimated 17.5 percent of newly licensed RNs leave their first nursing job within the first year, and one in three leave within two years, according to research conducted by RWJF’s RN Work Project. Advance for Nurses quotes co-directors Christine T. Kovner, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Carol Brewer, PhD, RN, FAAN. “One of the biggest problems we face in trying to assess the impact of nurse turnover on our health care system as a whole is that there’s not a single, agreed-upon definition of turnover,” Kovner said. “A high rate of turnover at a hospital, if it's voluntary, could be problematic,” Brewer added, “but if it’s involuntary or if nurses are moving within the hospital to another unit or position, that tells a very different story.” Nurse.com also covered the study.

Having incarcerated parents is associated with significant health problems and behavioral issues, and may be more harmful to children’s health than divorce or the death of a parent, USA Today reports. “These kids are saddled with disadvantages,” said Kristin Turney, PhD, author of the study that reached those conclusions. She is an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumna. “They’re not only dealing with parental incarceration, but also mental health issues.” The study found that having a parent in prison was associated with such conditions as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, speech or language problems, and developmental delays. Turney’s study was also covered by US News and World Report, Salon, Psych Central, Healthline and Mother Jones, among other outlets. 

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Sep 8 2014
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Field of Dreams

“In the NFL, you have to be ready for everything,” says Lutul Farrow, MD.

He should know: For more than three years, the orthopedic surgeon was a member of the medical staff for his hometown Cleveland Browns. With Farrow on the sidelines were a nonsurgical sports medicine doctor and an anesthesiologist; in the stands were a paramedic and a dentist. “That was just for our team,” he says.

Farrow currently works with the Yellow Jackets, a Division III team at his college alma mater, Baldwin Wallace University. Because football requires physician coverage at every game, he travels with the Yellow Jackets to games throughout the Ohio Athletic Conference. He’s also the head team physician for the Brunswick High School Blue Devils.

On game day, he has a field-level view of every play—and every injury. “We mostly see strains and sprains,” he says, including hamstring pulls, ankle sprains, and ligament sprains of the knee.

Farrow predicts that the current attention to concussions—most recently the NCAA’s settlement of a class-action lawsuit brought by former college players—will change the way the game is played.

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