Category Archives: Health Leadership, Education, and Training

Oct 30 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Scapegoating EHRs, Ebola fears, children fighting cancer, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

In an article published in Healthcare IT News, David Blumenthal, MD, MPP, writes that health care providers may be too quick to blame Electronic Health Records (EHR) for medical errors. Blumenthal notes that EHRs are still imperfect and that improvements will take time, but argues: “There is no going back in the electronic health information revolution. No physician or hospital, however loud their complaints, has ever thrown out their EHR and returned to paper. The dissatisfaction with the technology will recede as EHRs improve, and as a new generation of young clinicians, raised in the electronic world, populates our health care system.”  Blumenthal is president of The Commonwealth Fund, former National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, and an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient.

In a blog published by the Washington Post’s “Monkey Cage,” Shana Gadarian, PhD, and her co-author write that Ebola anxiety, while potentially misplaced and harmful, is likely to have an impact on whom Americans trust to handle the disease and what kinds of policies they will support to fight it. The authors have studies society’s reactions to small pox and H1N1 flu. “In general we find that anxiety makes people more supportive of government playing an expansive role in protecting them during a health crisis ... we think our study and the current Ebola outbreak both emphasize that people will rally around experts and increase their support for policies that fight the contagion, even if they hurt civil liberties. Let us hope that the U.S. health system is ultimately worthy of the confidence the public has in it.” Gadarian is an RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumna.

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Oct 28 2014
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New Cohort of RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars

Twelve talented early-career nurse faculty have been selected as the seventh cohort of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholars. The award is given to individuals who show outstanding promise as future leaders in academic nursing.

Each scholar receives a three-year $350,000 award to pursue research, leadership training in all aspects of the faculty role, and mentoring from senior faculty at his or her institution. The scholars chosen this year are using their grants to study a range of issues, from pediatric asthma to dementia care to health literacy to HIV treatment to the use of technology to improve access and outcomes for rural and uninsured individuals.

At a time when many schools of nursing are turning away qualified applicants because they do not have the faculty to teach them, RWJF’s Nurse Faculty Scholars program is helping more junior faculty succeed in, and commit to, academic careers. The program also is strengthening the academic productivity and overall excellence of nursing schools by developing the next generation of leaders in academic nursing.

Read more about the 2014 and final cohort of RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars.

Oct 27 2014
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Eight Peers, One Family

Swet Patel is a sophomore at the College of New Jersey, majoring in psychology. He is a graduate of Project L/EARN, a 10-week summer internship that provides training, experience and mentoring to undergraduate college students from socioeconomic, ethnic and cultural groups that traditionally have been underrepresented in graduate education. Project L/EARN is a project of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research, and Rutgers University.  

Swet Patel

On May 27, 2014, I finally ended my teens and entered my 20s. But I will forever remember this date as more than just my birthday. This was the first day of Project L/EARN.

Like my peers entering the program, I expected to gain research exposure that would be a great résumé booster. Little did I know I would gain so much more than just research experience. Although the 10-week program was intensive, and at some points it made me question why I was doing it, I never imagined I would be able to achieve so much in such a short period of time. I realized after seeing the fruits of my labor—the poster, the oral presentation, and the paper—that this program was beyond worth it.

Project L/EARN boosted my confidence. I actually feel like a researcher. And it was truly remarkable that I was able to meet such diverse individuals from a wide range of fields during the guest lecture series. I learned a great deal from these esteemed professionals regarding the different aspects of health care. The networking the program provided gave me lifelong relationships that I will forever cherish.

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Oct 24 2014
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Working Together to Draw More Nurses to Public Health

Patricia Drehobl, MPH, RN, is associate director for program development at the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC). She is an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellows program (2007-2010).

Patricia Drehobl

Human Capital Blog: CDC is engaging in new partnerships with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) to promote public health nursing. How did the new collaboration come about?

Pat Drehobl: CDC has funded some national academic associations for many years, including the Association of Schools of Public Health, the Association of Prevention Teaching and Research, and the Association of American Medical Colleges. We recognized the need to include nursing representation because nursing is the largest discipline in the public health workforce. We added AACN as a partner in 2012 when we developed our funding opportunity announcement to work with academic partners.

HCB: Why did CDC decide to reach out to the nursing community in 2012?

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Oct 22 2014
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It’s About More than Money

Heather J. Kelley, MA, is deputy director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Future of Nursing Scholars program.

Healther Kelley Heather Kelley

“Being selected as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Future of Nursing Scholar was such an honor!  I was already excited about starting my PhD program, but this took that excitement to another level.  I wasn't sure what to expect from the boot camp, but it was truly transformative.”  - Laren Riesche, a Future of Nursing Scholar attending the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Riesche was one of the 16 new scholars I was privileged to meet on August 5 and 6 at our program’s first-ever scholars’ event.  In addition to providing financial support to nurses to complete their PhDs in three years, the Future of Nursing Scholars program will also provide a series of leadership development activities.  One of these activities is a boot camp which will be held for each cohort prior to the start of their doctoral programs. 

Future of Nursing Scholars Bootcamp Future of Nursing Scholars Boot Camp

The first-ever boot camp was a two-day event at which the scholars were able to meet and connect with one another, and begin the work of developing skills that will serve them well as they pursue their PhDs.  Sessions addressed crucial issues, including developing strategies for peer coaching, and identifying and understanding one’s own approach to change and exerting influence.  The new scholars met with current doctoral students to discuss a variety of issues and were given time to network with program leaders, guest speakers, and each other.  A workshop served as an introduction to scholarly writing and the event closed with a panel on selecting and working with mentors.

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Oct 21 2014
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Getting Medical Residents Ready for Real Life

New guidelines from the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC) are intended to close the gap between expectations and the reality of what medical students are prepared to do at the start of their residencies.

Known as the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency, the guidelines include 13 activities—such as performing physical exams, forming clinical questions, and handing off patients to other physicians when residents go off duty—that all medical students should be able to perform, regardless of specialty, in order to be better prepared for their roles as clinicians. In August, AAMC launched a five-year implementation pilot with 10 institutions.

Ensuring that the nation’s medical school graduates “have the confidence to perform these activities is critical for clinical quality and safety,” AAMC President and CEO Darrell G. Kirch, MD, said in a news release earlier this year. “These guidelines take medical education from the theoretical to the practical as students think about some of the real-life professional activities they will be performing as physicians.”

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Oct 21 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The October 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research and trends relating to academic progression, leadership and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the October issue.

Campaign Helps Advance Institute of Medicine's Call for More Nurse Leaders
On the fourth anniversary of the release of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) landmark report on the future of the nursing profession, more nurse leaders are stepping into positions of power and influence—and efforts to prepare even more nurses for leadership are gaining ground. Today, the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action is putting new emphasis on the report’s leadership recommendation, and nurses and their employers in government and other sectors are responding. The Campaign is a joint initiative of RWJF and AARP.

Nursing Improvements Could Boost Outcomes for 7 Out of 10 Critically Ill Black Babies
A new study funded by RWJF’s Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative and the National Institute of Nursing Research provides insight into the issue of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, who are disproportionately black. Researchers found that nurse understaffing and practice environments were worse at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, contributing to adverse outcomes for VLBW infants born in those facilities.

California has “Well-Educated” Nurse Force, Study Finds
While California has a “well-educated” nurse force, a survey published by the state’s Board of Registered Nursing shows that there is a long way to go toward meeting the goal set forth by the Institute of Medicine’s landmark report on the future of nursing that 80 percent of nurses hold bachelor’s degrees or higher by 2020. About 60 percent of the state’s registered nurses have earned a bachelor’s or graduate degree in nursing or another field, the survey found. Nearly 40 percent of respondents—and nearly 80 percent of those under 35—said they are considering or seriously considering additional education.

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Oct 20 2014
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Thoughts on Mentoring

For 23 years, Project L/EARN has created stronger candidates for admission to graduate programs. The intensive, 10-week summer internship provides training, experience, and mentoring to undergraduate college students from socioeconomic, ethnic, and cultural groups that traditionally have been underrepresented in graduate education. Project L/EARN is a project of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research, and Rutgers University. In this post, interns and mentors share their insights on the value of mentoring in general, and on Project L/EARN in particular. For more, check out an accompanying Infographic: Project L/EARN: Milestones.

“Project L/EARN mentoring has been incredibly instrumental in my career path and has contributed greatly to my professional success. The program was my first major introduction to research, and helped me to apply and reinforce research methods and statistical analysis skills throughout my undergraduate and graduate years.” — Anuli Uzoaru Njoku, MPH, DrPH, post-doctoral fellow, Fox Chase Cancer Center, 1999 Intern

“Mentoring means allowing me to experience how someone else sees me—someone who believes in me and sees my potential, someone who can set my sights higher and in the right direction.” — Tamarie Macon, MS, PhD in progress, University of Michigan, 2006 Intern

“Project L/EARN mentoring, then and now, has been the difference between the summer program being a one-time experience, and the beginning of an educational and professional career that will undoubtedly contribute to the story of my life. The mentoring was the avenue by which my truest potential, of which I had no real awareness, was discovered and cultivated. That cultivation has resulted, and is still resulting, in opportunities and accomplishments that are beyond my imagination.” — David Fakunle, PhD in progress, Johns Hopkins University, 2008 Intern

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Oct 16 2014
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RWJF’s Clinical Scholars Program: A Proud Legacy of Creating Change

Encouraging physicians to be not only agents of care, but agents of change: That’s the challenge the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Clinical Scholars Program has embraced for 45 years, and it’s a challenge the Foundation has met with “great success,” writes Bharat Kumar, MD, in an article in the American Medical Association’s ethics journal, Virtual Mentor.

In an era of increased activism and access to health care as evidenced by the creation of Medicare and Medicaid, a group of medical school professors envisioned the Clinical Scholars Program as a way to move beyond “the detached and passive model of medical practice” and instead “train physicians to become agents of change, not only in the clinic and in the hospital, but also in communities, in classrooms, and the halls of power,” Kumar writes. Three years after the program was launched in 1969 at five universities, with support from the Carnegie Corporation and the Commonwealth Fund, it came under the auspices of RWJF.

The article describes the program’s current objective—to provide post-doctoral training for young physicians in health services research, community-based participatory research and health policy research—and its current structure: training sites at the University of Michigan, the University of Pennsylvania, Yale University, and the University of California, Los Angeles; a national program office at the University of North Carolina; and a longtime collaboration with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs that supports positions for Clinical Scholars via affiliated Veterans Affairs medical centers.

The program’s final cohort of scholars, selected this year, will follow in the footsteps of more than 1,200 alumni, many of whom “have become leaders in health care policy and delivery,” Kumar writes, with roles in all levels of government and notable advancements in the fields of pediatrics, internal medicine, and emergency medicine.

Alumna Stacey Lindau, MD, says in the article that the program’s “traditions of promoting excellence, critical thinking, and service extend beyond the two to three years of training, effectively creating a pipeline of alumni dedicated to service.”

Read “The Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program: Four Decades of Training Physicians as Agents of Change.”

Oct 15 2014
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Let’s Have a Conversation about Food that Goes Beyond Restriction and Restraint—and Resonates with Real People

Sonya Grier, PhD, MBA, is an associate professor of marketing at the Kogod School of Business at American University in Washington, D.C., and an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Health & Society Scholars program (2003-2005).

Sonya Grier Sonya Grier, PhD, MBA

Human Capital Blog: Congratulations on receiving the Thomas C. Kinnear award for your 2011 article in the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing on food well-being! Please tell us about the award.

Sonya Grier: The award honors articles published in the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing (JPP&M) that have made a significant contribution to the understanding of marketing and public policy issues. This year, eligible articles needed to have been published between 2010 and 2012. The marketing community was called upon to nominate articles for the award. JPP&M editorial review board members and associate editors then voted among the nominees.

Generously funded by Thomas C. Kinnear, his colleagues, friends and former students, and administered through the American Marketing Association  Foundation, the award’s purpose is to recognize authors who have produced particularly high-quality and impactful research in marketing and public policy.

HCB: How did your article do that?

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