Category Archives: Education and training

Oct 28 2014
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New Cohort of RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars

Twelve talented early-career nurse faculty have been selected as the seventh cohort of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholars. The award is given to individuals who show outstanding promise as future leaders in academic nursing.

Each scholar receives a three-year $350,000 award to pursue research, leadership training in all aspects of the faculty role, and mentoring from senior faculty at his or her institution. The scholars chosen this year are using their grants to study a range of issues, from pediatric asthma to dementia care to health literacy to HIV treatment to the use of technology to improve access and outcomes for rural and uninsured individuals.

At a time when many schools of nursing are turning away qualified applicants because they do not have the faculty to teach them, RWJF’s Nurse Faculty Scholars program is helping more junior faculty succeed in, and commit to, academic careers. The program also is strengthening the academic productivity and overall excellence of nursing schools by developing the next generation of leaders in academic nursing.

Read more about the 2014 and final cohort of RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars.

Oct 27 2014
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Eight Peers, One Family

Swet Patel is a sophomore at the College of New Jersey, majoring in psychology. He is a graduate of Project L/EARN, a 10-week summer internship that provides training, experience and mentoring to undergraduate college students from socioeconomic, ethnic and cultural groups that traditionally have been underrepresented in graduate education. Project L/EARN is a project of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research, and Rutgers University.  

Swet Patel

On May 27, 2014, I finally ended my teens and entered my 20s. But I will forever remember this date as more than just my birthday. This was the first day of Project L/EARN.

Like my peers entering the program, I expected to gain research exposure that would be a great résumé booster. Little did I know I would gain so much more than just research experience. Although the 10-week program was intensive, and at some points it made me question why I was doing it, I never imagined I would be able to achieve so much in such a short period of time. I realized after seeing the fruits of my labor—the poster, the oral presentation, and the paper—that this program was beyond worth it.

Project L/EARN boosted my confidence. I actually feel like a researcher. And it was truly remarkable that I was able to meet such diverse individuals from a wide range of fields during the guest lecture series. I learned a great deal from these esteemed professionals regarding the different aspects of health care. The networking the program provided gave me lifelong relationships that I will forever cherish.

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Oct 24 2014
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Working Together to Draw More Nurses to Public Health

Patricia Drehobl, MPH, RN, is associate director for program development at the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC). She is an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellows program (2007-2010).

Patricia Drehobl

Human Capital Blog: CDC is engaging in new partnerships with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) to promote public health nursing. How did the new collaboration come about?

Pat Drehobl: CDC has funded some national academic associations for many years, including the Association of Schools of Public Health, the Association of Prevention Teaching and Research, and the Association of American Medical Colleges. We recognized the need to include nursing representation because nursing is the largest discipline in the public health workforce. We added AACN as a partner in 2012 when we developed our funding opportunity announcement to work with academic partners.

HCB: Why did CDC decide to reach out to the nursing community in 2012?

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Oct 21 2014
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Getting Medical Residents Ready for Real Life

New guidelines from the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC) are intended to close the gap between expectations and the reality of what medical students are prepared to do at the start of their residencies.

Known as the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency, the guidelines include 13 activities—such as performing physical exams, forming clinical questions, and handing off patients to other physicians when residents go off duty—that all medical students should be able to perform, regardless of specialty, in order to be better prepared for their roles as clinicians. In August, AAMC launched a five-year implementation pilot with 10 institutions.

Ensuring that the nation’s medical school graduates “have the confidence to perform these activities is critical for clinical quality and safety,” AAMC President and CEO Darrell G. Kirch, MD, said in a news release earlier this year. “These guidelines take medical education from the theoretical to the practical as students think about some of the real-life professional activities they will be performing as physicians.”

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Oct 21 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The October 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research and trends relating to academic progression, leadership and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the October issue.

Campaign Helps Advance Institute of Medicine's Call for More Nurse Leaders
On the fourth anniversary of the release of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) landmark report on the future of the nursing profession, more nurse leaders are stepping into positions of power and influence—and efforts to prepare even more nurses for leadership are gaining ground. Today, the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action is putting new emphasis on the report’s leadership recommendation, and nurses and their employers in government and other sectors are responding. The Campaign is a joint initiative of RWJF and AARP.

Nursing Improvements Could Boost Outcomes for 7 Out of 10 Critically Ill Black Babies
A new study funded by RWJF’s Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative and the National Institute of Nursing Research provides insight into the issue of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, who are disproportionately black. Researchers found that nurse understaffing and practice environments were worse at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, contributing to adverse outcomes for VLBW infants born in those facilities.

California has “Well-Educated” Nurse Force, Study Finds
While California has a “well-educated” nurse force, a survey published by the state’s Board of Registered Nursing shows that there is a long way to go toward meeting the goal set forth by the Institute of Medicine’s landmark report on the future of nursing that 80 percent of nurses hold bachelor’s degrees or higher by 2020. About 60 percent of the state’s registered nurses have earned a bachelor’s or graduate degree in nursing or another field, the survey found. Nearly 40 percent of respondents—and nearly 80 percent of those under 35—said they are considering or seriously considering additional education.

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Oct 10 2014
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BSN Qualifications Recommended for the Nation’s Nurses: Four Years of Progress

Linda H. Aiken, PhD, RN, FAAN, is the Claire Fagin Professor of Nursing, professor of sociology, director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research, and senior fellow of the Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics at the University of Pennsylvania. Olga Yakusheva, PhD, is an associate professor at the University of Michigan School of Nursing.

Linda Aiken Linda H. Aiken

Four years ago the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) landmark report on the future of nursing was released. The study was remarkable in multiple respects including the interdisciplinary perspectives of national experts comprising the study committee, the breadth and scope of the study, its actionable recommendations, and the commitment of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to provide philanthropic funds to help implement the study’s recommendations—a rarity. One net result of the IOM Report, as viewed on the 4th anniversary of its release, is its notable impact on the commitment of stakeholders to finally make the transition of the nation’s nurse workforce to BSN qualifications, after many decades of limited progress.

Olga Yakusheva - medium enlarge Olga Yakusheva

Changing trends in nurse employment and education: The IOM recommended that 80 percent of nurses in the United States hold at least a baccalaureate in nursing (BSN) by the year 2020. The recommendation was quite bold considering that two-thirds of new nurses still graduated with less than a BSN, despite numerous previous reports and commissions over decades recommending the BSN as the entry qualification for professional nurses.  

While the percentage of nurses with bachelor’s and graduate education had been slowly increasing over time, when the IOM report was issued only about 49 percent of nurses held a BSN. However, the IOM’s recommendation, based upon a growing research base documenting that patient outcomes were better in settings that employed more BSN-qualified nurses, acted as a tipping point to mobilize responses from many stakeholders that together are impacting changes in nurses’ qualifications.

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Sep 23 2014
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Are Simulators as Effective for Nursing Students as Actual Clinical Experience?

In the last 15 years, the availability of high-fidelity simulation has slowly begun to transform the clinical education of the nation’s nursing students. Schools that once relied on the combination of classroom education and hands-on experience in a clinical environment began to mix in time in a simulation lab, where nursing students could work with highly sophisticated mannequins able to display a range of symptoms and react in real-time to treatment.

Such simulation labs offer many advantages to nurse educators, including the ability to replicate a range of patient situations, thus allowing students to practice specific nursing skills without having to practice their budding skills on actual patients.

But how effective are simulators at training the next generation of nurses? That’s a question that the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) has a particular interest in answering, because the state boards it represents are asked with increasing frequency to permit nursing schools to replace on-the-ground clinical time with simulation.

In pursuit of an answer, NCSBN conducted a full-scale study, tracking 666 nursing students for two academic years, beginning in Fall 2011, and then for six months longer as they began their work in the nursing profession. During their nursing school experience, one-quarter of the students had traditional clinical experiences with no simulation, another quarter had 25 percent of their clinical hours replaced by simulation, and the remaining half had 50 percent of their clinical hours replaced by simulation. At various points during their training and subsequent work as nurses, all study participants were assessed for clinical competency and nursing knowledge.

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Sep 16 2014
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Inaugural Cohort of 16 Future of Nursing Scholars Announced

The new Future of Nursing Scholars program has announced its first cohort of 16 nurse scholars who are receiving scholarships and other support as they pursue PhDs in nursing. The students were selected by schools of nursing that have received grants to provide those scholarships.

Each Future of Nursing Scholar will receive financial support, mentoring and leadership development over the three years of her or his PhD program. They are in the initial stages of selecting the topics for their doctoral research, which range from infection control in the elderly population to the impact of stigma on people with mental illness to the quality of life of children with implanted defibrillators.

In addition to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, United Health Foundation, Independence Blue Cross Foundation, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and the Rhode Island Foundation are supporting the Future of Nursing Scholars grants to schools of nursing this year. The program is located at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing.

Read more about the first cohort of Future of Nursing Scholars.

Schools of nursing with research-focused PhD programs can apply to join the program here.

Sep 5 2014
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RWJF Alum Takes on New Role as CEO of Nurse Education Organization

Deborah E. Trautman, PhD, RN, is the new chief executive officer of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and executive director of the Center for Health Policy and Healthcare Transformation at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She is an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Health Policy Fellows program (2007-2008).

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Human Capital Blog: Congratulations on your new position as CEO of AACN! What are your priorities as CEO?

Deborah Trautman: AACN is highly regarded in health care and higher education circles for advancing excellence in nursing education, research, and practice. I am honored to have this unique opportunity to support the organization’s mission and move AACN in strategic new directions. As CEO, I will place a high priority on continuing to increase nursing’s visibility, participation, and leadership in national efforts to improve health and health care. I look forward to working closely with the AACN board, staff, and stakeholders to advocate for programs that support advanced education and leadership development for all nurses, particularly those from underrepresented groups.

HCB: What are the biggest challenges facing nurse education today, and how will AACN address those challenges?

Trautman: Nurse educators today must meet the challenge of preparing a highly competent nursing workforce that is able to navigate a rapidly changing health care environment. As the implementation of the Affordable Care Act continues, health care is moving to adopt new care delivery models that emphasize team-based care, including the medical (health care) home and accountable care organizations.

These care models require closer collaboration among the full spectrum of providers and will impact how health care professionals are prepared for contemporary practice. Nursing needs to re-envision traditional approaches to nursing education and explore how best to leverage the latest research and technology to prepare future registered nurses (RNs) and advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). Greater emphasis should be placed on advancing interprofessional education, uncovering the benefits of competency-based learning, identifying alternatives to traditional clinical-based education, and instilling a commitment to lifelong learning in all new nursing professionals.

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Aug 20 2014
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The Importance of Emphasizing Healthy Habits for All Children

Carolyn Montoya, PhD, PNP, is associate professor and interim practice chair at the University of New Mexico College of Nursing and a recent graduate of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nursing and Health Policy Collaborative at the University of New Mexico College of Nursing.

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Human Capital Blog: Congratulations on your award from the Western Institute of Nursing! The award honors new nurse researchers. What does it mean for you and for your career?

Carolyn Montoya: In addition to being quite an honor, receiving the Carol Lindeman Award for new researchers from the Western Institute of Nursing motivates me to continue to pursue my research. I am sure people can relate to the fact that being in the student mode is so very intense that once you finish you need some recovery time. Then you start wanting to use the research skills you worked so hard to obtain, and this award has helped to re-energize my commitment to research.

HCB: The award recognizes your study on children’s self-perception of weight. Please tell us what you found.

Montoya: I was very interested to see if there was a difference between how Hispanic children viewed their self-perception in regard to weight compared with white children. Seventy percent of my study population was Hispanic, and my overall response rate was 42 percent. I found that Hispanic children, ages 8 to 11, are not better or worse than white children in their ability to accurately perceive their weight status. Most surprising, and a bit concerning, was the fact that one-third of the sample expressed a desire to be underweight.

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