Category Archives: Education level

Oct 9 2013
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Hardwiring 80 by 20 in a North Texas Hospital

Three years ago this week, the Institute of Medicine issued a landmark report, Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. Its recommendations include increasing the proportion of nurses with baccalaureate degrees to 80 percent by 2020. Cole Edmonson, DNP, RN, FACHE, NEA-BC, is chief nursing officer at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Executive Nurse Fellow (2012 – 2015). He also serves as practice team co-lead for the Texas Team, the state’s Action Coalition.

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Improving the lives of people in the communities we serve is our guiding mission and it is supported by our Magnet Redesignation program and our professional practice model. In 2010, when the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Future of Nursing report was released, we were one of the few IOM meeting sites in Texas to bring together people from both practice and academia to hear about the report and begin to discuss how we might fulfill the 2020 vision with the creation of new partnerships.

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The IOM report was a call to action, to which we responded. Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, a part of Texas Health Resources, began the journey by exposing leadership and direct care staff to the report, the research (compelling reasons) behind it, its recommendations, and the gap analysis of the organization in the eight areas of recommendations.

The nursing leadership, with the direct care nurses and the system leadership, integrated the Future of Nursing report into our nursing strategic plan in 2011. The strategies and tactic with metrics of success set in motion a series of actions to meet the 80 percent bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) goal by 2020, doubling the nurses with doctorates, Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) practice scope, and positioning nurses in strategic positions including the Board of Trustees.

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Oct 8 2013
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A Culture Where Education Is Valued and Celebrated

Three years ago this week, the Institute of Medicine issued a landmark report, Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. Its recommendations include increasing the proportion of nurses with baccalaureate degrees to 80 percent by 2020. Charleen Tachibana, MN, RN, FAAN, is senior vice president, hospital administrator, and chief nursing officer at Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle, Washington. Tachibana is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Executive Nurse Fellow (2009 – 2012).

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Virginia Mason Medical Center began a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN)-only hiring guideline in the summer of 2012. The change in hiring guidelines for our staff followed a decade of having educational guidelines in place for our nurse leaders. This was a critical step in our success, as our leaders were able to support and understand the need for this change. It’s important for leaders to model lifelong learning, including advancement with formal education. So, last August I also began my Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program.

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The publication of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on the Future of Nursing really provided the momentum to move to another level.  The prominence of this report has made this a relatively easy transition and provided the clarity on why this is critical for our patients and for our profession at this point in time. 

Although we have focused this requirement on new hires, it’s been impressive to see the wave of staff RNs returning to school, many for their master’s or doctorate degrees.

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May 2 2013
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New Data: Nursing Profession Is Bigger, More Diverse, Better Educated

A report released Monday by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) indicate that efforts to grow and diversify the nursing workforce are showing results—a welcome finding given the looming shortage of nurses and primary care providers in general.

According to the data from HRSA's National Center for Health Workforce Analysis, the nursing profession grew substantially in the 2000s, adding 24 percent more registered nurses (RNs) and 15.5 percent more licensed practical nurses (LPNs). Significantly, the growth in the supply of nurses outpaced growth in the U.S. population, with the number of RNs per capita growing by about 14 percent and the number of LPNs per capita increasing by 6 percent.

The "pipeline" carrying nurses from school to the workforce also expanded during the past decade. The number of would-be nurses who passed national nurse licensing exams to become RNs more than doubled between 2001 and 2011, while the number of LPN test-passers grew by 80 percent. Significantly, the share of licensure candidates with bachelor's degrees increased during that time, as well.

The profession also is growing more diverse, according to the data. Non-white RNs are now 25 percent of the profession, up from 20 percent 10 years ago. Nine percent of RNs are men today, up slightly from 8 percent at the beginning of the decade.

Read more about the HRSA report.
The full analysis is available at HRSA's website.

Sep 20 2012
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A Personal Reason to Applaud an Important Advance for Academic Progression in Nursing

By Susan B. Hassmiller, PhD, RN, FAAN, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Senior Adviser for Nursing and Director, Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action.

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Those of us who are working to implement recommendations from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, got great news this week when leaders from national organizations representing community college presidents, boards, and program administrators joined with representatives from nursing education associations to endorse a Joint Statement on Academic Progression for Nursing Students and Graduates.  This was a historic moment that will mean greater support for efforts to help nurses advance their education.

Acknowledging the shared goal of preparing a well-educated, diverse nursing workforce, the consensus statement says that nursing students and practicing nurses should be supported in their efforts to pursue higher levels of education. Its endorsing organizations are the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), the Association of Community Colleges Trustees (ACCT), the National League for Nursing (NLN), and the National Organization for Associate Degree Nursing (N-OADN).

In addition, Donna Meyer, MSN, RN, the president of N-OADN, an affiliated council of AACC, published a powerful commentary in Community College Times. In it, Meyer voiced support for allowing every associate degree nurse access to additional nursing education and urged employers and others to develop innovative strategies to help associate degree nurses get higher degrees.

All this had special meaning for me, because I started my career at a community college.  It was a terrific experience for me, and I am very proud of that degree. I felt confident and prepared to complete all the tasks required of me when I entered the workforce.

But I quickly realized there was more I wanted – and needed – to know to provide high-quality care for my patients. So I went back to school, and soon felt the increased competence, and confidence, at every turn.

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Aug 29 2012
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Meet the New Jersey Nursing Initiative

This is part of a series introducing programs in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Human Capital Portfolio.

New Jersey has a staggering 10.5 percent vacancy rate for nurse faculty.

If those positions are not filled, nursing schools may have to turn away prospective students, which would exacerbate the shortage of nurses required to meet the state’s growing health care needs. That shortage could have a significant negative effect on health and health care in New Jersey.

Additionally, many faculty at New Jersey nursing schools are approaching retirement, and there are not enough people in the pipeline to fill the positions. The situation is dire, but a relatively young statewide initiative is working to change that.

The New Jersey Nursing Initiative (NJNI) is a multi-year, multi-million-dollar project of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the New Jersey Chamber of Commerce Foundation. NJNI’s goal is to increase the number of nurse faculty in the state, so there will be enough nurses to meet the health care needs of New Jersey residents.

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Since its launch at a state Senate hearing in May 2009, the initiative has prepared young nursing scholars to take on leadership roles and has brought the issue of the nurse faculty shortage to the attention of policy-makers, businesses, academia, and health and community leaders.

Its signature Faculty Preparation Program is preparing 61 RWJF New Jersey Nursing Scholars to become the next generation of nurse faculty in the state. Of those, at least 21 will be doctorally prepared candidates.

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Aug 23 2012
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Nine States Receive RWJF Grants to Build More Highly Educated Nursing Workforce

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Academic Progression in Nursing (APIN) program this week announced that California, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Montana, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Texas and Washington state have been chosen to receive grants to advance state and regional strategies aimed at creating a more highly educated, diverse nursing workforce. Each state will receive a two-year, $300,000 grant. 

The states will now work with academic institutions and employers on implementing sophisticated strategies to help nurses get higher degrees in order to improve patient care and help fill faculty and advanced practice nursing roles.  In particular, the states will encourage strong partnerships between community colleges and universities to make it easier for nurses to transition to higher degrees.

In its groundbreaking report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended that 80 percent of the nursing workforce be prepared at the baccalaureate level or higher by the year 2020.  At present, about half of nurses in the United States have baccalaureate or higher degrees.

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May 8 2012
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National Nurses Week 2012 and New Jersey

Happy National Nurses Week! The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has a proud history of supporting nurses and nurse leadership, so this week, the RWJF Human Capital Blog will feature posts by nurses, including leaders from some of our nursing programs. Check back each day to see what they have to say. This post is by Susan Bakewell-Sachs, PhD, RN, PNP-BC, interim provost for The College of New Jersey, and program director of the New Jersey Nursing Initiative, a project of RWJF and the New Jersey Chamber of Commerce Foundation.

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The American Nurses Association theme for National Nurses Week 2012 is “Nurses: Advocating, Leading, Caring.” It emphasizes critical areas of focus for professional nursing in New Jersey and the nation that align well with the 2010 Institute of Medicine report entitled Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. National Nurses Week is an opportune time to highlight nurses and nursing and the scientifically proven contributions that our profession makes to improve health and patient care.

It is also a good time to talk about what we still need to make happen to improve health and health care. For one thing, we must continue to push for more registered nurses to earn advanced (masters and doctoral) degrees. This is essential for nursing practice, education and research. We need many more advanced practice nurses for primary and specialized care, more nurse educators to prepare nurses for the future, and more nurse scientists to continue to build the evidence for our practice and teaching.

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One of the wonderful aspects of a nursing career is that nurses can have multiple careers within it and can be clinicians, teachers and researchers. We need to advocate for a better educated profession with a higher proportion of nurses having baccalaureate and higher degrees as well as advocate for healthier lifestyle opportunities for our society and for a better health care system for those we care for.

We must lead for a better future. Nurses should seek to lead, wherever they are, throughout their careers. Leading requires gaining specific and broad knowledge, taking a public position, being willing to find solutions and engaging in difficult dialogue when necessary. It also requires us to be willing to speak up inside and outside of nursing, with members of other disciplines.

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May 7 2012
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Creating a Better Educated Workforce: Transforming Patient Care

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Happy National Nurses Week! The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has a proud history of supporting nurses and nurse leadership, so this week, the RWJF Human Capital Blog will feature posts by nurses, including leaders from some of our nursing programs. Check back each day to see what they have to say. This post is by Geraldine "Polly" Bednash, PhD, RN, FAAN, Chief Executive Officer/Executive Director of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and National Program Director, New Careers in Nursing (NCIN).

The environment and systems in which health care is delivered have grown increasingly complex over the last decade. For some time now, many individuals have contrasted the intensive care unit of the past with the medical surgical units of today, noting there is not much difference. Patient care is more complex, the technology is more sophisticated, new knowledge is emerging and nurses and other health professionals are being asked to consider the need to have a dramatically increased level of sophistication about how to intervene in all of this. Moreover, health care knowledge and science is expanding rapidly with new evidence emerging daily about patient care, while the locus of care delivery changes at the same rapid pace. Just contrast the cataract surgery of today with that done 20 years ago. Or the increasing focus on care delivered in communities, not acute care systems.

How do we provide the highest quality care, that is safe, timely, effective, efficient, and patient centered care – the STEEEP scenario – if we do not embrace the importance and value of expanding our capacity to intervene through lifelong learning and through formal education? And how do we assure that we are prepared to seek that emerging knowledge and apply it in the complex array of systems or circumstances in which care is delivered if we are not continually striving to grow our capacity to intervene?

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Mar 23 2012
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The Case for Nursing Education Progression

By Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, President and CEO, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

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Change is a constant in health care. In the face of skyrocketing costs, system fragmentation, health disparities and an aging and sicker population, more care will be delivered in primary care and community/public health sites than in acute- and hospital-based settings. Yet we also face a primary care shortage and the coming infusion of 32 million newly insured people into the system.

To ensure an adequate supply of nurses with the advanced skills and expertise necessary to help bridge the gap while ensuring quality, higher levels of education are imperative. Thus, health care organizations, educational institutions and others are looking intently at the case for advancing nursing education as outlined in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. Specifically, the IOM report recommended creating a system that produces more nurses educated at the Bachelor of Science (BSN) level and beyond.

Since its inception, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has understood the value of a strong, well-trained health care workforce. And we agree with the IOM report that the nursing profession has the potential to effect wide-reaching changes in the health care system. Further, we concur that an improved education system is necessary to ensure that nurses can continue to deliver safe, quality, patient-centered care required for the 21st century and beyond.

As I recently told NursingOutlookTalk.com, there are a number of things that hospitals and other organizations that employ nurses can do to facilitate education progression. And it is to their benefit to do so.

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Mar 22 2012
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RWJF Launches New Initiative to Support Academic Progression in Nursing

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) yesterday announced the launch of the Academic Progression in Nursing (APIN) initiative, to advance state and regional strategies to create a more highly educated nursing workforce. The $4.3 million, Phase 1 two year-initiative will provide funding to state Action Coalitions as they work to advance the recommendation in the Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, that 80 percent of the nursing workforce be prepared at the baccalaureate level by 2020.

The nine funded Action Coalitions will each work on at least one strategy related to academic progression and at least one related to employment for baccalaureate or higher-prepared nurses, to ensure demand for their services. Thus, academic-service partnerships are key to the success of this effort.

“Our Action Coalitions around the country have generated extraordinary collaboration between nurses and other leaders, who are working together to build a more highly educated and diverse nursing workforce, promote nurse leadership, support interprofessional collaboration, ensure that nurses practice to the full extent of their education and training, and improve data collection,” Susan B. Hassmiller, RN, PhD, FAAN, RWJF senior adviser for nursing, said in a release. “We are confident that the new models they create will be replicable and help achieve our goal to have 80 percent of the nursing workforce be prepared at the baccalaureate level or higher by 2020. Advancing a more highly educated, diverse workforce is essential to achieving the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s mission to improve health and health care in this country.”

The initiative will be led by the Tri-Council for Nursing, consisting of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, National League for Nursing, American Nurses Association and the American Organization of Nurse Executives.

Learn more about the Campaign for Action.

Read more about the Action Coalitions.

Watch the Action Coalition video series.