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Nov 21 2014
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The Legacy of PIN: Strengthening Long-Term Care in Arkansas

Chris Love, MMin, MSLE, is the program director for the Arkansas Community Foundation, which served as the lead foundation for the Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) project, Planning for Workforce Development in Geriatric and Long-Term Care.

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As PIN holds its final national meeting this week, the Human Capital Blog is featuring posts from PIN partners about the program’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities. PIN is an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

Chris Love

The PIN journey with Arkansas Community Foundation and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), among other partners, has been one of both providence and progress. It was in the fall of 2008 that we were approached by leaders from UAMS with the idea for us to become partners with them in this endeavor.

At first, the idea seemed daunting. Then, after some consideration by our senior leadership, it became an open door for opportunity—an opportunity to leverage the structure and resources of our foundation to complement the expertise of our colleagues and friends at UAMS to address a major issue of mutual concern: the aging population in our state and the significant shortage of adequately prepared nurses to care for that population. Not long into the partnership, our organizations realized this would be a match made in heaven.

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Nov 20 2014
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The Legacy of PIN: Keeping the Pipeline Flowing

Bobbie D. Bagley, MS, RN, MPH, CPH, is director of public health and an instructor in the nursing program at Rivier University. She played a key role in the Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) Pipeline Project. Paula Smith, MBA, is director of the Southern New Hampshire Area Health Education Center and is in the doctoral program in education, leadership and learning at Rivier University. She oversaw implementation of the Nursing Quest summer camps, the Diverse Nurse Network, and the Minority Nursing Student Support Program components of the Pipeline Project. 

PIN Logo

As PIN holds its final national meeting this week, the Human Capital Blog is featuring posts from PIN partners about the program’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities. PIN is an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

As New Hampshire becomes increasingly diverse, partners in the state have joined together to promote workforce diversity. These are exciting times. Support from RWJF and other funders provided the opportunity to implement the New Hampshire Nursing Diversity Pipeline Project—a partner-driven effort to increase diversity within the nursing workforce as well as nursing faculty. Lead partners included the Endowment for Health, the New Hampshire Office of Minority Health and Refugee Affairs, the BRINGIT!!! Program (Bringing Refugees, Immigrants and Neighbors, Gently Into Tomorrow—an after school enrichment program), and the Southern New Hampshire Area Health Education Center (AHEC). In addition, this Pipeline Program engaged partners from a variety of organizations in the state, including hospitals, medical practices, youth-serving organizations, middle and high schools, as well as nursing leaders in practice and academia.

In addition, this Pipeline Program engaged partners from a variety of organizations in the state, including hospitals, medical practices, youth-serving organizations, middle and high schools, as well as nursing leaders in practice and academia.

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Nov 20 2014
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The Legacy of PIN: An Urban-Rural Model to Increase the Number of Baccalaureate Nurses

Darlene Curley, MS, RN, FAAN, is executive director of the Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare, which served as the lead foundation for the Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) project, Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses (RIBN).

As PIN holds its final national meeting this week, the Human Capital Blog is featuring posts from PIN partners about the program’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities. PIN is an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

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Darlene Curley

Human Capital Blog: Why did the Jonas Center decide to become a part of PIN? What were your goals for the project?

Darlene Curley: There were three things that were attractive about PIN. First, there was this project itself, which was developing a pathway for associate degree to baccalaureate nurses. That’s critical for building a highly educated workforce and a pipeline for preparing the next generation of faculty. The second reason was the partnership funding model. It related to the Jonas Center’s philosophy that we should be funding projects together with others in nursing, but also in interdisciplinary models for health. The third reason was the process of bringing stakeholders together in regions, which was critical. We knew that if we could bring nurse educators, students and other stakeholders together to work on the RIBN project, that group could stay together and work on other projects that were important to nursing and health care as they came along. The third reason was the process of bringing stakeholders together in regions, which was critical. We knew that if we could bring nurse educators, students and other stakeholders together to work on the RIBN project, that group could stay together and work on other projects that were important to nursing and health care as they came along.

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Nov 19 2014
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The Imperative to Improve Health Literacy

Joy P. Deupree, PhD, MSN, APRN-BC, is an assistant professor at the University of Alabama (UAB) School of Nursing and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellow. She is engaged in community participatory research studies on health literacy. For 12 years, Deupree has taught a campus-wide elective on health literacy and has been a guest lecturer on the topic at the UAB schools of medicine, dentistry and public health. She founded the Alliance of International Nurses for Improved Health Literacy and established a nursing special interest group for the Health Literacy Annual Research Conference.

Joy Deupree

Health literacy is extremely important to building a culture of health. Basic understanding of health care information is essential if people are to live healthy lives, but an alarming number of American adults report poor understanding of health care instructions. 

This year marks the 10-year anniversary of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Confusion.While progress has been made, the work has really just begun. We can no longer blame the patient for poor health literacy, and we should keep in mind that limited health literacy affects us as all and contributes to increased health care costs. 

American Public Health Association Meeting & Expo

The IOM report defines health literacy as “the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.” These skills involve not only reading ability but also numeracy. Failure to develop the necessary skills to manage health care can cost millions of dollars as well as add to human suffering and even cause death.

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Nov 19 2014
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Population Sickness and Population Health: How Geographic Determinants Differ

Tamara G.J. Leech, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Indiana University Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, and a former Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) New Connections program grantee. She is principal investigator of a William T. Grant Scholar Award, “Pockets of Peace: Investigating Urban Neighborhoods Resilient to Adolescent Violence.”  

Tamara G. Leech

I am particularly excited about the American Public Health Association’s (APHA) Annual Meeting theme this year—Healthography! My research team has spent the past two years examining “cold spots” of urban youth violence. In other words, we have been analyzing areas where—regardless of the increased risk for violence—violence is not occurring or is rarely occurring. This is a departure from the dominant form of research on “hot spots” of violence, or any disease for that matter.  

American Public Health Association Meeting & Expo

For some, this approach has been puzzling. It’s not immediately obvious that the determinants of cold spots are not simply the opposite of the determinants of hot spots.  However, our evidence clearly suggests that the things that help to make a location healthy go well beyond the things that protect a location from high rates of illness.

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Nov 18 2014
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The Stuff That Is Killing Us

Ronald M. Wyatt, MD, MHA, is medical director in the Division of Healthcare Improvement at The Joint Commission. In this role, he promotes quality improvement and patient safety to internal and external audiences, works to influence public policy and legislation for patient safety improvements, and serves as the lead patient safety information and education resource within The Joint Commission. On December 5, RWJF will explore this topic further at its first Scholars Forum: Disparities, Resilience, and Building a Culture of Health. Learn more about it.

Ron Wyatt

I first met Don Erwin, MD, in 2010. He was CEO of the St. Thomas Clinic in New Orleans. I sought him out on the recommendation of the CEO of the Institute for Health Care Improvement (IHI), Donald Berwick, MD. I was a fellow of the IHI, and Berwick and I had conversed about inequities in the U.S. health care system. He advised me to travel to New Orleans to speak with Erwin, who would give me insight that would be important to the project that I was working on: “Disparity in the Deep South.”

Scholars Forum 2014 Logo

Erwin was very welcoming and asked why I was there.  In a very academic tone, I told him that I was there to better understand the non-medical determinants of health. With a semi-puzzled look on his face, Erwin asked what I meant. Now I became puzzled and a bit uncomfortable. My response was that I was interested in learning more about the role of social determinants on health.  Erwin said, “Ron, I am not sure what you are talking about.” 

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Nov 18 2014
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On Balance and Contrast

For the 25th anniversary of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP), the Human Capital Blog is publishing scholar profiles, some reprinted from the program’s website. SMDEP is a six-week academic enrichment program that has created a pathway for more than 22,000 participants, opening the doors to life-changing opportunities. Following is a profile of Nicole Stern, MD, member of the class of 1991.

Nicole Stern, MD Nicole Stern, MD

First, there’s her heritage: her father is Jewish, her mother full-blooded Mescalero Apache. Then there’s her training: Stern is board certified in internal medicine and sports medicine. And as a woman practicing sports medicine, she is an uncommon presence in a male-dominated profession.

“I certainly have a lot of dual things in my life,” she muses.

Stern’s cultural background gives her a unique vantage point on health care, particularly the disproportionate number of Native versus non-Native practitioners. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, American Indians represent less than 1 percent of physicians.

As president of the Association of American Indian Physicians (AAIP) from 2012 to 2013, Stern pushed to increase the pipeline of American Indian and Alaska Native medical students. She continues to support AAIP in reversing what she calls a “flatline” in applicants and matriculants from Native populations.

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Nov 18 2014
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Research by RWJF Clinical Scholars Explores Antibiotic Overuse, Weight-Loss Smartphone Apps, More

New studies conducted by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Clinical Scholars and published as part of a special November supplement of the Annals of Internal Medicine offer fresh insights on a range of topics, including: How hospitals can improve antibiotic prescribing practices; how a simple change to the format of electronic health records can encourage the use of money-saving generic drugs; how a lottery-based incentive program for patients could increase participation in colon cancer screening; and whether a popular smartphone weight-loss app actually helps patients lose weight.

The supplement was published with the support of RWJF. Studies in the issue include:

Special Training for Physicians in Antibiotics Decreases Inappropriate Use and C. difficile Infections

With growing concerns about increasing antibiotic-resistant bacteria, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been urging hospitals to adopt antibiotic “timeouts.” Nearly 50 percent of antibiotic use is unnecessary or inappropriate, according to the CDC, so what can hospitals and physicians do to ensure that antibiotics continue to be effective? The McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) in Montreal tested a simple approach: provide monthly in-person trainings for physicians and residents in appropriate antibiotic use and implement a weekly review of all patients receiving antibiotics. This approach decreased inappropriate antibiotic use and resulted in a mild decline in Clostridium difficile infections. “Our pilot program led to significant savings in the cost of antibiotics paid out of our hospital budget,” said RWJF Clinical Scholars alumna and Louise Pilote, MD, PhD, MPH, Chief of Internal Medicine at the MUHC and McGill University. “This is good news for anyone concerned about antibiotic effectiveness and reducing health care costs.”

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Nov 17 2014
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Ending Health Inequality, Addressing the Social Determinants of Health

Thomas LaVeist, PhD, is founding director of the Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions, and the William C. and Nancy F. Richardson Professor in Health Policy at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He is the chair of the National Advisory Committee for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Center for Health Policy at Meharry Medical College. On December 5, LaVeist will moderate the first RWJF Scholars Forum: Disparities, Resilience, and Building a Culture of Health. Learn more about it.

Thomas LaVeist

Research has amply demonstrated that social and economic forces are important determinants of health. They affect where and how people live, work, learn and play; their patterns of social engagement; and the financial and social resources available to them. They thereby shape their health and length and quality of life. 

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The World Health Organization’s Commission on Social Determinants of Health suggested four strategies in which policy can be deployed to address health inequalities:

  • decreasing social stratification (e.g., power, prestige, wealth, human capital, etc.);
  • decreasing exposure to risk;
  •  lessening the vulnerability or improving the ability of disadvantaged persons to cope with risk; or
  • intervening through health care to reduce the unequal consequences of social determinants.

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Nov 17 2014
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Is Louisville, Kentucky, the New Face of Asthma Healthography?

Meredith Barrett, PhD, is vice president of science and research at Propeller Health, a health technology company working to reduce the burden of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). She is an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Health & Society Scholars program at the University of California (UC), Berkeley and UC, San Francisco. Learn about the RWJF Briefings @ the Booth at the APHA Annual Meeting on Monday, November 17 and Tuesday, November 18.

Meredith Barrett

Leaders in Louisville, Kentucky, know first-hand that where you live and work affects your health and well-being. During a special session at the American Public Health Association’s meeting this week in New Orleans, we explore how the air quality in Louisville neighborhoods impacts the health, economy and overall vibrancy of the community. And we’ll highlight how Louisville is the poster child for tackling tough issues like asthma head-on, top-down and bottom-up, through data and collaboration among individual residents, corporate execs, community organizers and public leaders. 

American Public Health Association Meeting & Expo

Asthma attacks are sneaky, expensive and debilitating, yet almost entirely preventable.

Asthma is one of the most common and costly chronic diseases in the United States, affecting more than 8 percent of the U.S. population. Despite decades of research and the development of effective treatments, rates of morbidity have not declined and health care costs reach more than $50 billion a year. Asthma also leads to more than 13 million missed days of school and 10 million missed days of work, negatively affecting educational achievement, employee productivity and regional business growth. But the most frustrating part is that a large proportion of these hefty impacts could be avoided with improvements in self-management, community policy and advances in digital health care.

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