Search Results for: Seth Holmes

May 29 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Scandals and reforms at the VA, excluding the elderly from medical studies, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

In a Washington Post opinion piece, RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumnus Colin Moore, PhD, writes that the budding scandal over patient waiting times at regional Department of Veterans’ Affairs medical centers (VA) could lead to positive reforms, if past troubles at the VA are any guide. “Throughout its history, the VA’s very public failures have shaped its development as profoundly as its successes,” Moore writes. For example, previous failures led to the adoption of the 1996 Veterans’ Health Care Eligibility Reform Act, which transformed the VA by opening more outpatient clinics and embracing new ways to track and measure health care outcomes. The recent scandal involving falsified reporting on patient waiting times could lead to another cycle of much-needed improvements, Moore writes.

“Doctors are often in the dark” when prescribing medications or procedures to older patients, because the elderly are routinely excluded from medical research, Donna Zulman, MD, MS, co-writes in an opinion piece for the New York Times. Studies have shown that 40 percent of medical research excluded individuals over the age of 65. “Clinicians consequently have to extrapolate findings about diseases as diverse as cancer, heart attacks, and mental illness from studies of younger and often healthier people, potentially putting their older patients at risk.” Older patients should be included in medical studies because age can affect the way a person’s body processes medication and other treatments, according to Zulman, an RWJF Clinical Scholars alumna.

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Mar 20 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: ADHD medication, reconstruction after mastectomy, care for returning veterans, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

NBC News reports on a surge in the number of young adult women taking ADHD medication. An RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient, Stephen Hinshaw, PhD, explains that the rise in diagnoses among women in that age group may be evidence of failure to recognize the problem when the women were children. They may not have manifested symptoms as visibly as their male classmates with ADHD did, turning their distress inward rather than misbehaving in class, for example.

“How people with mental disorders are viewed by treatment providers and the general public can have a significant impact on treatment outcomes and the quality of life of clients,” Jennifer Stuber, PhD, and colleagues write in a study reported by Health Canal. The researchers presented vignettes about people with mental health problems to mental health providers and the general public, and compared their reactions. Providers had more positive attitudes, but some held views about the danger such patients might pose in the workplace that the researchers called “concerning.” Stuber is an RWJF Health & Society Scholars alumna.

More women are having breast reconstruction after mastectomies, USA Today reports. As a result of a 1998 federal law, most group insurance plans that cover mastectomies also cover breast reconstruction. Researchers found that the share of women who received reconstruction after mastectomy rose from 46 percent to 63 percent between 1998 and 2007. Author Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil, an RWJF Physician Faculty Scholars alumna, says the law could be contributing to the increase. The study was also covered by 9 News (Denver) and WKYC.com (Cleveland), among other outlets.

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Feb 4 2014
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RWJF Milestones, February 2014

The following are among the many honors received recently by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, grantees and alumni:

Former New Orleans Health Commissioner Karen DeSalvo, MD, MPH, MSc, is now leading the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology in Washington, D.C. An RWJF Generalist Physician Faculty Scholar alumna, DeSalvo also was recently named one of Governing Magazine’s nine public officials of the year

Brendan G. Carr, MD, MA, MS, assistant professor of emergency medicine and epidemiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has been named director of the federal Emergency Care Coordination Center (ECCC). The ECCC was created by presidential directive to improve national preparedness and response by promoting research, regional partnerships, and effective emergency medical systems. Carr is an RWJF Clinical Scholars alumna.

RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program alumna Ann Cashion, PhD, RN, FAAN, has been named scientific director of the National Institute of Nursing Research’s (NINR) Division of Intramural Research. Cashion was formerly a senior advisor to the NINR Office of the Director. Cashion’s research expertise focuses on genetic markers that predict clinical outcomes.

Pamela Jeffries, PhD, RN, ANEF, has been named the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing’s first vice provost for digital initiatives. Jeffries, a professor and associate dean for academic affairs, will remain on the faculty at the School of Nursing. She is an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program alumna.

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Dec 19 2013
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Human Capital News Roundup: Body mass index and kidney function, impact of health spending on life expectancy, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

The Food & Drug Administration issued a proposed rule on December 16 that would require makers of antimicrobial and antibacterial soaps and body washes to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of their products, the Examiner reports. Scientists have long been concerned that the common anti-bacterial ingredient triclosan may harm health. Allison Aiello, PhD, MS, concluded in a 2007 report that soaps containing triclosan “were no more effective than plain soap at preventing infectious illness symptoms and reducing bacterial levels on the hands.” Aiello is an RWJF Health & Society Scholars alumna. Read her post on the RWJF Human Capital Blog.

In the first study to estimate health spending efficiency by gender across industrialized nations, RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus Arijit Nandi, PhD, and others discovered significant disparities within countries. The research team found that increased spending on health brought stronger gains in life expectancy for men than for women in nearly every nation, Newswise reports. The United States ranked 25th among the 27 countries studied when it came to reducing women’s deaths.

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Nov 7 2013
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Human Capital News Roundup: Cost of care, cash for clunkers, secure housing, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

In a New York Times op-ed, Peter Ubel, MD, examines the need for physicians to incorporate the cost of care into treatment conversations with patients. Ubel is an RWJF Generalist Physician Faculty Scholar and an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient. “[T]he financial burden of paying for medical care can cause more distress in patients’ lives than many medical side effects,” he writes. Read more about Ubel’s views.

In lieu of expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett proposes to direct low-income residents to insurance marketplaces to purchase state-subsidized private plans. In a Philly.com op-ed, David Grande, MD, MPA, discusses whether the plan will cost more than traditional Medicaid. Grande is the associate director of the RWJF Clinical Scholars program and an alumnus of the RWJF Health & Society Scholars program.

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Oct 30 2013
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Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies

Seth M. Holmes, PhD, MD, is an alumnus of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholars program and an assistant professor of public health and medical anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. The following is an excerpt from his recently published book, Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United States.

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“The first Triqui picker whom I met when I visited the Skagit Valley was Abelino, a thirty-five-year-old father of four. He, his wife, Abelina, and their children lived together in a small shack near me in the labor camp farthest from the main road. During one conversation over homemade tacos in his shack, Abelino explained in Spanish why Triqui people have to leave their hometowns in Mexico.

In Oaxaca, there’s no work for us. There’s no work. There’s nothing. When there’s no money, you don’t know what to do. And shoes, you can’t get any. A shoe like this [pointing to his tennis shoes] costs about 300 Mexican pesos. You have to work two weeks to buy a pair of shoes. A pair of pants costs 300 Mexican pesos. It’s difficult. We come here and it is a little better, but you still suffer in the work. Moving to another place is also difficult. Coming here with the family and moving around to different places, we suffer. The children miss their classes and don’t learn well. Because of this, we want to stay here only for a season with [legal immigration] permission and let the children study in Mexico. Do we have to migrate to survive? Yes, we do.

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Aug 15 2013
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Human Capital News Roundup: Brain cell regeneration, malpractice concerns, reducing drug overdose-related deaths, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

Newly licensed registered nurses who experience high or moderate levels of verbal abuse by physicians have less favorable perceptions of their work environments, lower intent to stay in their jobs, and lower commitment to their organizations, according to a study by the RWJF-supported RN Work Project. Health Leaders Media, Becker’s Hospital Review and Medical XPress are among the outlets to report on the findings. Learn more about the study.

Can social media accurately measure public opinion and be a good indicator of how people will vote? Research co-authored by RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumnus Fabio Rojas, PhD, finds a strong correlation between how often a candidate is mentioned in tweets—regardless of what is said about him or her—and that candidate’s final share of the vote. The researcher team’s data predicted the winner in 404 out of 406 competitive races using data from 2010, Rojas writes in an op-ed for the Washington Post.

Physicians who worry about malpractice lawsuits order more diagnostic tests and refer patients to the emergency room more often than other physicians, according to a study co-authored by RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient Michelle M. Mello, JD, PhD, MPhil. The result is higher medical costs for patients, MarketWatch reports.

The Herald (Rock Hill, SC) reports on a study led by RWJF Health & Society Scholars alumna Margaret Sheridan, PhD, that finds that a mother's perceived social status affects her child's brain development and stress indicators. “Our results indicate that a mother's perception of her social status 'lives' biologically in her children,” Sheridan said.

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