Search Results for: Lindrooth

Dec 4 2013
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The Importance of Nursing in Achieving the “Best Care at Lower Cost”

Richard C. Lindrooth, PhD, is an associate professor at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Olga Yakusheva, PhD, is an associate professor of economics at Marquette University. Both are grantees of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative.

file Richard C. Lindrooth

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) released the findings of its Committee on the Learning Health Care System in America in a report entitled “Best Care at Lower Cost: The Path to Continuously Learning Health Care in America[i] in September, 2012. The report recognized that the complexity of clinical decision-making is rapidly increasing and that clinicians need to continuously update their skills in order to keep up with (1) rapidly expanding diagnostic and treatment options and (2) the increasingly complex and chronic clinical condition of patients.  Given the growing external demands placed on nurses, the IOM reports that a critical determinant of the success of an organization in dealing with these demands is how “a learning health care organization harnesses its internal wisdom—staff expertise, patient feedback, financial data, and other knowledge—to improve its operations.”

file Olga Yakusheva

Nurses in particular are in an excellent position to play a central role in creating a virtuous feedback loop such that it is feasible to continuously adjust and incrementally improve systems in response to rapidly changing external demands.  The report, supported by the results of a growing and increasingly robust body of academic research, stresses the important role of leadership and management in fostering and maintaining an environment within which continuous learning could take hold.

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May 15 2013
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Will Dr. Robot Open New Doors for Nurses?

Olga Yakusheva, PhD, is an associate professor of economics at Marquette University. Richard C. Lindrooth, PhD, is an associate professor at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. Both are grantees of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative.

file

Technological innovation is rapidly transforming patient care. A new generation of innovations will potentially change the most fundamental aspect of the patient experience – patients’ interactions with physicians and nurses. The FDA recently approved the first autonomous telemedicine robot for use in acute care hospitals. Even more advanced technologies, some capable of processing up to tens of millions of pages of plain medical text per second, are being tested and may soon be used to diagnose conditions and recommend treatment, with limited input from clinicians.

"We suggest that nurses should embrace rather than fear these innovations."

This new technology has the potential to perform several tasks more efficiently than clinicians, albeit with some limitations. It can quickly and effectively sift through large amounts of information and, based on a complex set of guidelines, create a probability-weighted list of diagnoses and recommendations. The result will be purely evidence-based and free of human cognitive decision-making biases.  The technology can drastically speed diffusion of new research and guidelines through electronic dissemination, similar to automatic software updates, and make most novel treatment regimens instantly available to patients.

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Oct 7 2011
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Human Capital News Roundup

Here’s a sampling of recent news coverage of the work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Scholars and Fellows:

Craig Pollack, MD, MHS, an RWJF Clinical Scholars program alumnus, and Julia Lynch, PhD, an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient and alumna of the RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research program, coauthored an op-ed in the New York Times titled “Foreclosures Are Killing Us.” They write: “Foreclosure is not just a metaphorical epidemic, but a bona fide public health crisis. When breadwinners become ill, they miss work, lose their jobs, face daunting medical bills — and have trouble making mortgage payments as a result. But that is only part of the story. A growing body of research shows that foreclosure itself harms the health of families and communities.”

Craig Pollack was also one of several guests to join California Attorney General Kamala Harris on Southern California Public Radio to discuss a state investigation of banks accused of wrongdoing in the foreclosure crisis.

RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumna Rene Almeling, PhD, is the author of a new study of the fertility market called “Sex Cells,” which has gotten significant media coverage. Most recently the research was noted by Proud Parenting and the Daily Beast. Almeling was also a guest on The Morning Buzz on WORT- FM.

RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows alumna Laura Anderko, PhD, RN, was interviewed by the Associated Press for a story about tainted food outbreaks, in light of the recent listeria outbreak in cantaloupe. Food Science Chef is among the outlets that printed the story, and Anderson’s comments made the Associated Press’ “Quotations of the Day.”

RWJF Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Scholar Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa appeared recently on C-SPAN, participating in a U.S. Chamber of Commerce-sponsored briefing on immigration policy.

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