Category Archives: Regional

Jun 29 2012
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Bold Moves, Outside-the-Box Thinking to Promote Nurse Leadership in North Carolina

By Connie Mullinix, PhD, MBA, MPH, RN, Clinical Associate Professor, East Carolina University College of Nursing, Member, Coordinating Council, North Carolina Action Coalition, Chair, Leadership Task Force on Board Involvement of Nurses

Connie Mullinix

In North Carolina, we take seriously the recommendation from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to prepare nurses for leadership. This is a daunting task, if you understand the history of nursing. Traditionally, women in our society have been groomed to be unassertive and (usually male) others were looked to for ideas and directions. This was no less true, and perhaps even more true, in the field of nursing. However, for modern health care systems to address patients’ needs efficiently and well, today’s nurses must speak up to provide their insights and help lead a necessary transformation in health care.

Encouraging leadership has been chosen as a key recommendation of the IOM’s recent report—The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health—and one that is most likely to result in positive change in health care in the coming years. The North Carolina Action Coalition is focusing on three aspects of leadership support: preparing nurses for participation on boards of directors; mentoring nurse leaders; and defining the competencies of nurse leaders. The Coalition has assembled three task forces to address each of these issues.

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Jun 19 2012
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The Pennsylvania Action Coalition: Voices Carrying a Campaign

Michelle Scott recently graduated from Rowan University and is an intern at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), working with The Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action.

Michelle Scott

I had the privilege of attending the Pennsylvania Action Coalition conference in Philadelphia in early June. It was hosted by Julie Fairman, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Afaf Meleis, PhD, DrPS (hon), FAAN, and the co-leads of the Pennsylvania Action Coalition, Betsy Snook, MEd, MSN, RN, and Christine Alichnie, PhD, RN

The conference was held to educate Pennsylvanians about how nurses and other leaders can prepare themselves for these monumental changes in health care as recommended in the Institute of Medicine report The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. The audience included nurses and other health professionals, business employees, educators and students. It is this diversity that drives the campaign. We need resources to ensure the many campaign supporters can advance its agenda.

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Jun 19 2012
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The Pennsylvania Action Coalition Launch: Students Speak Out

The following Q&A was conducted by Michelle Scott, a recent graduate of Rowan University who is an intern at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), working with The Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action. Scott recently attended a conference to launch the Pennsylvania Action Coalition, and interviewed some students who also participated. Read Scott’s reflections on the conference here.

Question: What do you feel your role as a rising physician will be in the plan to bring nurses and doctors together to work toward improving patient care?

Paul Shay: In health care, there has been a historical hierarchy that places the infallible physician above all other health care providers; however, recent literature has shown that collaborative health care is the best health care. It turns out that doctors aren’t infallible, and every team member, from social worker to nurse to physician, is equally valuable in patient care.

As a rising physician, I would be foolish not to embrace this collaboration in my future practice. I will make a concerted effort to let all of my non-physician colleagues know and feel that they are equal members in our team. Furthermore, it is equally, or arguably more, important that I advocate for other physicians to do the same. And outside of our own practices, we need to support the efforts of nursing organizations such as the Pennsylvania Action Coalition and the Pennsylvania State Nurses Association (PSNA).

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Jun 5 2012
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Satcher, Sullivan, Young - Oh my!

By Lisa Wright Eichelberger, DSN, RN, dean, College of Health, Clayton State University and co-lead, Georgia Action Coalition

Lisa Eichelberger

I know I am not in Oz but, I must tell you, Georgia does seem like a different place since the release of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) report on the future of nursing. I have worked as a nurse in Georgia for the past 16 years, but in the past 18 months I have seen things happen that I never thought would. As I told this year’s graduating class at Clayton State University, I truly believe this is the most exciting time to be a nurse. One of the reasons is the release of the IOM’s nursing report and the support for nursing from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and AARP.

Make no mistake, when the IOM and RWJF speak, people listen.

In the past few months, I have had the honor and privilege to use the “Future” report to initiate conversations with former Surgeon General David Satcher, MD, PhD, and Louis Sullivan, MD, former secretary of the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services. I also had the opportunity to talk to former Ambassador Andrew Young, BS, BDiv, about the report during a recent lunch. All three of these leaders were familiar with the IOM and RWJF.

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May 25 2012
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"We Knew the Need Was Significant": Nurse Leadership by Example

Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN), a partnership between the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the Northwest Health Foundation, devoted the latest issue of its PIN Point newsletter to the topic of leadership and featured the Leading Toward Tomorrow Project, which cultivates nurse leaders in southeast Michigan, with a primary focus on geriatric care. Below, three project leaders weigh in on what led them to tackle leadership development and what they’ve learned along the way.

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Why does your organization see nursing leadership as an area worthy of investment?

Elizabeth Sullivan, MPA, vice president for community investment at the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan: We felt it was important to build the nursing workforce and to do it in a way, in this particular project, that supports retention and mobility of nurses. We knew that the need was significant in southeast Michigan, and we knew it was important to do this with nurses in acute and long-term care settings. Our interest was working with novice nurses who found themselves in management positions and were working in care settings that serve a lot of older adults.

Carole Stacy, MA, MSN, RN, director of the Michigan Center for Nursing: On one of our nursing surveys several years ago, one of the questions was: If you’ve left a nursing job in the last two years, what was the reason? One of the answers they could select was that they had difficulty with their nurse manager or with administration. Over the course of several surveys, we kept seeing that particular response chosen in large numbers. Then we really started going out and looking at what the problem was. We found that in Michigan, we do not do a very good job of preparing people to be in nursing management. Just because they’re a good nurse, we assume they’ll have the skills needed to be a good manager. And that’s frequently not the case.

Nora Maloy, DrPH, senior program officer at the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation: The Foundation has been supporting the profession of nursing since 2003, when we developed an initiative addressing the nursing shortage. That put us in touch with nurse leaders from around the state. Since then, through our nurse leader colleagues, we have seen the impact of nursing on all aspects of health care, including access, policy and quality of care.

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Mar 26 2012
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Diverse Partnerships are Key to Texas Team's Success

By Alexia Green, RN, PhD, FAAN, professor and dean emeritus, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and co-leader of the Texas Action Coalition

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Creating and sustaining partnerships is vital to the Texas Team: Advancing Health through Nursing—a state Action Coalition of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action. Although the Texas Team was only approved as an official Action Coalition in September 2011, we have been working diligently to recruit and build partners who can support the campaign through 2020.

The various state Action Coalitions—such as the Texas Team—are composed of multiple entities (mostly other organizations), which in turn are composed of multiple individuals. Engaging and maintaining interest and commitment from these multiple entities is a very real challenge for the Texas Team and other newly formed Action Coalitions, but it is vital to all our success in achieving our Institute of Medicine (IOM) goals in our respective states. As leaders we must strive to engage all these partners and promote a common vision toward achieving the IOM goals.

Key to our success in Texas has been the recruitment of BlueCross BlueShield of Texas as our lead business organization for the statewide team. BlueCross BlueShield partners with the Texas Nurses Association as our lead nursing organization to advance the health of Texans through our Coalition activities. The Texas Hospital Association was an early partner and has also been very supportive of our activities.

Other diverse partners that have joined our Coalition include Bell Helicopter. Yes, that’s right, the folks who make helicopters! (And no, they haven’t provided us with any rides yet!) But they are very committed to advancing the health of our state through nursing. Associates in Process Improvement, a group of improvement scientists (yes, those same scientists who work with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement) have also joined us because they too deem nurses integral to the improvement of health care across our nation.

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Jan 31 2012
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MyHeartMap Challenge: Mapping Life-Saving Defibrillators in Philadelphia

By Raina Merchant, MD, MSHP, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars program alumna and assistant professor, University of Pennsylvania Department of Emergency Medicine

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If the person next to you went into cardiac arrest, would you know what to do? Would you know where to find an automated external defibrillator (AED) to shock and restart their heart? Millions of public places across the United States have AEDs that can save lives – airports, casinos, churches, gyms and schools, among them – but most people don’t know where they’re located. Every second counts when someone’s heart stops beating, and time spent searching for an AED is time wasted in increasing the chances of survival.

Surprisingly, no one knows where all of the country’s AEDs are located. Requirements for AED reporting and registration vary widely by state, and no comprehensive map of their locations has ever been compiled. As a result, 911 dispatchers aren’t always able to direct callers to an AED in an emergency, and callers have no good way of quickly locating one on their own.

This week, I launched the MyHeartMap Challenge with a multidisciplinary team from the University of Pennsylvania. This pilot study will use social media and social networking tools to gather this critical public health data and create searchable maps of Philadelphia’s AEDs that can be used by health professionals and the general public.

The first step of our challenge is a Philadelphia-based community-wide contest. We’re asking Philadelphians to find and photograph AEDs over the next six weeks, and submit the photo and location to us via a mobile app or our website. You can also participate if you don’t live in Philadelphia by finding a creative way to use your social network or harness crowdsourcing.

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Jan 12 2012
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Action Coalitions at Work: California

The California Action Coalition has brought together nursing and physician organizations, educational institutions, government agencies and workforce centers to advance the recommendations in the Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health.

Watch California Action Coalition co-leads Deloras Jones, RN, MS, and Terry Hill, MD, FACP, discuss the goals for their state. This video is part of a series released by The Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, highlighting the goals and the ongoing work of some of its state-based collaborations that are working to implement change.

Read more about the Action Coalitions.

See our previous coverage of the Action Coalition video series.

Oct 24 2011
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Action Coalitions at Work: Montana

Watch the video of Casey Blumenthal, MHSA, RN, CAE, and Cynthia Gustafson, PhD, RN, discussing the work of the Cooperative to Advance Health through Nursing, a Montana effort to implement recommendations from the Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health. This video is part of a series released by The Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, highlighting the goals and the ongoing work of some of its Action Coalitions—state-based collaborations that are helping advance these recommendations.

Read more about the Action Coalitions.

See our previous coverage of the Action Coalition video series.

Oct 15 2011
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Action Coalitions at Work: Hawaii

The Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action has released videos highlighting the goals and the ongoing work of some of its Action Coalitions—state-based collaborations that will help advance the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine’s Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health report. Watch the video of Dale Allison, PhD, APRN, and Mark Forman, MPH, JD, discussing the work of the Hawaii Action Coalition, led by the Hawaii State Center for Nursing and the Hawaii Medical Service Association Foundation.

Read more about the Action Coalitions.

See our previous coverage of the Action Coalition video series.