Category Archives: Partners Investing in Nursing's Future

Mar 25 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The March 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the March issue.

Nurses Need Residency Programs Too, Experts Say
Health care experts, including the Institute of Medicine in its report on the future of nursing, tout nurse residency programs as a solution to high turnover among new graduate nurses. Now, more hospitals are finding that these programs reduce turnover, improve quality, and save money. Success stories include Seton Healthcare Family in Austin, Texas, which launched a residency program to help recent nursing school graduates transition into clinical practice. Now, three out of four new graduate nurses make it to the two-year point, and five or six new nurse graduates apply for each vacant position.

Iowa Nurses Build Affordable, Online Nurse Residency Program
Some smaller health care facilities, especially in rural areas, cannot afford to launch nurse residency programs to help new nurses transition into clinical practice. A nursing task force in Iowa has developed an innovative solution: an online nurse residency program that all health care facilities in the state—and potentially across the country—can use for a modest fee. The task force was organized by the Iowa Action Coalition and supported by an RWJF State Implementation Program grant.

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May 25 2012
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"We Knew the Need Was Significant": Nurse Leadership by Example

Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN), a partnership between the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the Northwest Health Foundation, devoted the latest issue of its PIN Point newsletter to the topic of leadership and featured the Leading Toward Tomorrow Project, which cultivates nurse leaders in southeast Michigan, with a primary focus on geriatric care. Below, three project leaders weigh in on what led them to tackle leadership development and what they’ve learned along the way.

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Why does your organization see nursing leadership as an area worthy of investment?

Elizabeth Sullivan, MPA, vice president for community investment at the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan: We felt it was important to build the nursing workforce and to do it in a way, in this particular project, that supports retention and mobility of nurses. We knew that the need was significant in southeast Michigan, and we knew it was important to do this with nurses in acute and long-term care settings. Our interest was working with novice nurses who found themselves in management positions and were working in care settings that serve a lot of older adults.

Carole Stacy, MA, MSN, RN, director of the Michigan Center for Nursing: On one of our nursing surveys several years ago, one of the questions was: If you’ve left a nursing job in the last two years, what was the reason? One of the answers they could select was that they had difficulty with their nurse manager or with administration. Over the course of several surveys, we kept seeing that particular response chosen in large numbers. Then we really started going out and looking at what the problem was. We found that in Michigan, we do not do a very good job of preparing people to be in nursing management. Just because they’re a good nurse, we assume they’ll have the skills needed to be a good manager. And that’s frequently not the case.

Nora Maloy, DrPH, senior program officer at the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation: The Foundation has been supporting the profession of nursing since 2003, when we developed an initiative addressing the nursing shortage. That put us in touch with nurse leaders from around the state. Since then, through our nurse leader colleagues, we have seen the impact of nursing on all aspects of health care, including access, policy and quality of care.

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Feb 8 2012
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Executive Nurse Fellows Program a Springboard for Nurse Leaders

By Wanda Montalvo, MSN, ANP, RN, Chair, National Diabetes Education Program Operating Committee, RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program alumna (2004-2007), and Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future National Advisory Committee member

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The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellows (ENF) program has literally changed the trajectory of my professional achievements and personal development as a leader. The ENF program aims to prepare nurse leaders to shape the U.S. health care system and requires us to be innovative, strategic visionaries, risk takers and skillful at creating the change we want to see in our health care delivery system.

As a National Advisory Committee member of Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN), I have been able to leverage my skills as a strategic thinker to help partners see the connection between their projects and the potential impact they have on their communities. As an advisor to the program, there is a great sense of responsibility because our recommendations impact funding decisions, partnership expansion, and innovative projects.

I view myself as a nurse leader who is able to listen well and be nimble during collaboration with partners and who is able to identify key points while remaining focused on the end game. The ENF program prepared me to be politically savvy and skillful at interacting with key leaders to solve problems while using “on the ground” experience to expand projects.

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Jan 18 2012
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Milwaukee Nurses Rebuild Pipeline of Public Health Nurses

By Paula Lucey, MSN, RN, Administrator, Milwaukee County Behavioral Health Division, RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program alumna (1999-2001)

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The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Partners Investing in Nursing program (commonly called PIN) is a wonderful way to address nursing workforce efforts. The Foundation created this program with the concept that nursing workforce efforts needed to become the work of not only nursing but the work of partnership with local foundations and employers.

In Milwaukee, our first PIN grant focused on the impending crisis in public health related to the nursing workforce. We had data that suggested that upwards of 50 percent of the current workforce could retire in the next five years. While not all will do so, this was a wake up call that we needed to begin to work to develop the next generation of public health nurses.

Our program was able to energize some senior nursing students to consider careers in public health. While our numbers were under 20, the students spread the word to their fellow students, and we believe we created a ripple of interest among students at several of the local BSN programs.

As important as the immediate efforts related to these students were, some of the project’s accomplishments will form the foundation for long-term solutions. The most important was increased awareness of the importance of public health and the vital role that nursing plays among our three foundation partners.

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Dec 27 2011
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Accessible, Affordable, High Quality Care for All

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As we head into 2012, the Human Capital Blog asked Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) staff, program directors, scholars and grantees to share their New Year’s resolutions for our health care system, and what they think should be the priorities for action in the New Year. This post is by Amy Jester, Program Manager for Health & Nonprofit Resources, Humboldt Area Foundation for the Humboldt Bay Regional Simulation Center, Eureka, California. The Simulation Center is a grantee of Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future.

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Our New Year’s resolution for the United States health care system is to ensure low cost access to health care for those most vulnerable, especially for those who struggle to make a living as a result of the economic downturn – whether that be through affordable health coverage, low-cost health care providers, and/or the development of a sufficient, high-quality health care workforce that meets the needs of patients young and old.

The highest priority for action in the New Year should be accessible, affordable, high quality care for all.

Nov 16 2011
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A Family Caregiver and Patient Safety Advocate Says: We Don't Need to Reinvent the Wheel, But We Need to Roll on the Ones We Have... Collaboratively

By Carol Compas, PhD(c), BSN, RN, CPHQ, Program Director, Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future, Little Rock, Arkansas

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My broken health care journey begins with a call from my sister on August 18 at 5:15 p.m. I am beginning to wrap up my busy workday when I take a call and hear a tearful plea along the lines of: “Mother has been in a wreck and they are asking for the next of kin.” I leave work, agreeing upon a designated meeting point so we can ride together to reach our mother in the most timely fashion. Our “normal” routine would have safely delivered us home for dinner with family, but this evening our routine will be at the mercy of the health care system, starting in the emergency room.

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As we struggle to safely navigate rush-hour traffic, we know the normal one-hour drive is looking more like a two-hour journey to reach our mother—not so timely in light of the situation. As we drive, we tag-team our cellphone communication between family, friends and, in this case, care providers. The fortunate thing for my family is, I have a 25-year career in intensive care, emergency medicine and quality improvement. So, as my sister is responsible for family and friend notifications, I am taking on responsibility for a rapid-cycle health care plan for mother. I phone the ER to make sure they are aware of the head injury en route, review her medications, list allergies and highlight the pertinent medical history. The charge nurse assures me she has documented my information and will pass it on once Mother arrives. I’m somewhat assured things will operate accordingly since I feel confident I am on her health care team. My sister and I arrive an hour after Mother does, are quickly escorted to her side, and find her calling out for me.

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Sep 16 2011
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Human Capital News Roundup

Several Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholars and Fellows have been in the news in recent days. Here’s a sampling.

The Wall Street Journal Ideas Market blog reports on a study in which Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Health & Society Scholars program alumnus Matt Wray, PhD, MA, and a co-author examine suicides identified by county coroners. The piece, “The Subtle Politics of Suicide Rates,” concludes that determinations of suicide may be affected by whether the coroners are elected or appointed.

“The University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing has been selected as a grant recipient of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program for a second year,” the Columbia Daily Tribune reports. “The school will receive $50,000 to support five students [from backgrounds that] are traditionally underrepresented in the field of nursing in the school’s accelerated baccalaureate program.”

The Augusta Chronicle (Georgia) reports on a meeting last week of the Greater Augusta Healthcare Network. Lucy Marion, PhD, RN, FAAN, an alumna of the RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program and secretary for the Healthcare Network, gave a presentation at the meeting.

RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient Jason Karlawish, MD, was among those quoted in a New York Times story about a small study that finds an insulin nasal spray may delay or slightly improve early Alzheimer’s symptoms. Experts caution the study is only a pilot and is not conclusive. Read a post Karlawish wrote for the Human Capital blog recently about another Alzheimer’s-related issue.

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Sep 7 2011
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Investing in Solutions, Locally

Judith Woodruff, J.D., is the director of workforce development at the Northwest Health Foundation and program director for Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future, a program of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

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The saying goes that all politics is local. But it’s even truer when it comes to the health care workforce. Every community, from large, complex cities to one stop sign rural towns, faces challenges in ensuring they have the educated and skilled health care professionals they need to provide quality health care. But their challenges are different.

That’s something that the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and my own organization, the Northwest Health Foundation (NWHF), have known for a long time. And the RWJF's and NWHF’s Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) program capitalizes on just that, making investments for local solutions to nursing issues.

The problems facing the nursing workforce don’t have a one-size-fits-all fix. And in our experience, solutions that are developed from outside the local area simply don’t work as well as those developed in your hometown. When local partners engage and participate in change from the onset, the solutions are tailored to the community needs and assets and the partners are invested in the outcomes. Projects become more sustainable, become ingrained in the community experience, and have the potential for long-term impact. That idea, borne of Northwest Health Foundation’s long experience in local and regional collaboration in Oregon and southwest Washington State, is a cornerstone of the PIN project.

The nursing workforce will soon face new patient demographics as our population is aging, becoming more ethnically and racially diverse and experiencing chronic diseases. Additionally, it is predicted that soon more people will gain access to health care services as a result of national and state health care coverage reform. At a time when the social landscape is rapidly changing, investments in nursing are more imperative than ever before.

That’s why we are so pleased to announce 11 new PIN investments to foster innovations in nursing. The regional partnerships supported by the investments are working to find solutions to the most pressing problems facing the nursing workforce. The new funding brings to 61 the number of PIN projects, covering 37 states and collectively, collaborating with more than 500 partners.

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Sep 2 2011
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Human Capital News Roundup

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholars and Fellows have been busy making news lately. Here’s a sampling.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) President and CEO Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, M.D., M.B.A., was named one of Forbes magazine’s “Worlds’ 100 Most Powerful Women.” Others on the list include German Chancellor Angela Merkel, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and First Lady Michelle Obama, New York Times Executive Editor Jill Abramson and television’s Oprah Winfrey.

RWJF Clinical Scholar Michael Hochman, M.D., is the lead author of a study that finds the results of medication studies published in leading medical journals may be misleading or confusing to readers. The Salt Lake Tribune and Health Canal are among the outlets that reported on Hochman’s work.

Clinical Scholars program alumnus Matthew O'Brien, M.D., spoke to Today’s Dietitian magazine about a study that finds Hispanic adults who are obese often don’t receive exercise or diet advice from their physicians.

The RWJF Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) program last week announced 11 new investments in nursing workforce projects across the country. Among the outlets to report on funded projects in their area: Rochester Business Journal (New York), KARK-TV (Arkansas), Boston Business Journal (Massachusetts), Wyoming Business Report, and the State Journal-Register (Illinois). Learn more about the new PIN investments.

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Aug 1 2011
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Promoting Nurse Leadership in Virginia with a Partners Investing in Nursing's Future Grant

By Amy Gillespie, R.N., M.S.N., Ed.D.

Nursing Advisor, Nurse Leadership Institute of Virginia

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The Nurse Leadership Institute of Virginia works to increase nurse retention and improve client safety in health care institutions by increasing the leadership skills of nurse managers.

Realizing that nursing workforce issues are multi-faceted and require innovative approaches, the Richmond Memorial Health Foundation reached out to community nursing and other health care organizations – including the Virginia Partnership for Nursing, Virginia Nurses Association, Virginia Organization of Nurse Executives, and Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing – to develop the Central Virginia Nurse Leadership Institute.

With matching funds provided through Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN), a collaboration between the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), the consortium was able to cross organizational and territorial lines to develop an innovative, community-wide Institute to provide leadership skill development for nurse managers from all sectors of health care: public health, hospitals, academic health centers, long-term care, and home health.

The Central Virginia Nurse Leadership Institute accepted its first class of fellows in the fall of 2007. The success of the program led to a five-year sustainability grant from the Richmond Memorial Health Foundation and expansion beyond central Virginia. Nurses from throughout Virginia are now eligible to apply for and attend the Nurse Leadership Institute of Virginia.

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