Category Archives: Partners Investing in Nursing's Future

Dec 17 2014
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The Legacy of PIN: A New Level of Collaboration in the Pacific

Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN), an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), was represented in the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) by two partnerships: Building Nursing Faculty Capacity in the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands, which brought together the American Pacific Nurse Leaders Council, the World Health Organization and others to strengthen nursing education in the USAPI; and Step by Step, Hand in Hand: Expanding PIN Synergies in the Pacific, which introduced the Dreyfus Health Foundation’s Problem Solving for Better Health® (PSBH®) model to effect change within nursing education and within communities. 

As part of a series of posts on PIN’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities, a number of the USAPI partners have responded to the question: What do you think has been the major impact of the Pacific PIN?

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“Since the first meeting of the Pacific PIN, we have come to learn more about each other’s nursing programs and the common needs that we shared. Through the years, this knowledge has expanded our friendship to those who have patiently stayed with us and directed us toward sharing resources and seeking new learning experiences, all to increase the number of qualified nurses for the Pacific region. I am most grateful to the foundations that were directly involved and the special people who made this all possible. Fa’afetai tele.”

--Lele Ah Mu, RN, BSN, Chair, Nursing Department, American Samoa Community College, American Samoa

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Nov 21 2014
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The Legacy of PIN: Strengthening Long-Term Care in Arkansas

Chris Love, MMin, MSLE, is the program director for the Arkansas Community Foundation, which served as the lead foundation for the Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) project, Planning for Workforce Development in Geriatric and Long-Term Care.

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As PIN holds its final national meeting this week, the Human Capital Blog is featuring posts from PIN partners about the program’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities. PIN is an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

Chris Love

The PIN journey with Arkansas Community Foundation and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), among other partners, has been one of both providence and progress. It was in the fall of 2008 that we were approached by leaders from UAMS with the idea for us to become partners with them in this endeavor.

At first, the idea seemed daunting. Then, after some consideration by our senior leadership, it became an open door for opportunity—an opportunity to leverage the structure and resources of our foundation to complement the expertise of our colleagues and friends at UAMS to address a major issue of mutual concern: the aging population in our state and the significant shortage of adequately prepared nurses to care for that population. Not long into the partnership, our organizations realized this would be a match made in heaven.

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Nov 20 2014
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The Legacy of PIN: Keeping the Pipeline Flowing

Bobbie D. Bagley, MS, RN, MPH, CPH, is director of public health and an instructor in the nursing program at Rivier University. She played a key role in the Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) Pipeline Project. Paula Smith, MBA, is director of the Southern New Hampshire Area Health Education Center and is in the doctoral program in education, leadership and learning at Rivier University. She oversaw implementation of the Nursing Quest summer camps, the Diverse Nurse Network, and the Minority Nursing Student Support Program components of the Pipeline Project. 

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As PIN holds its final national meeting this week, the Human Capital Blog is featuring posts from PIN partners about the program’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities. PIN is an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

As New Hampshire becomes increasingly diverse, partners in the state have joined together to promote workforce diversity. These are exciting times. Support from RWJF and other funders provided the opportunity to implement the New Hampshire Nursing Diversity Pipeline Project—a partner-driven effort to increase diversity within the nursing workforce as well as nursing faculty. Lead partners included the Endowment for Health, the New Hampshire Office of Minority Health and Refugee Affairs, the BRINGIT!!! Program (Bringing Refugees, Immigrants and Neighbors, Gently Into Tomorrow—an after school enrichment program), and the Southern New Hampshire Area Health Education Center (AHEC). In addition, this Pipeline Program engaged partners from a variety of organizations in the state, including hospitals, medical practices, youth-serving organizations, middle and high schools, as well as nursing leaders in practice and academia.

In addition, this Pipeline Program engaged partners from a variety of organizations in the state, including hospitals, medical practices, youth-serving organizations, middle and high schools, as well as nursing leaders in practice and academia.

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Nov 20 2014
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The Legacy of PIN: An Urban-Rural Model to Increase the Number of Baccalaureate Nurses

Darlene Curley, MS, RN, FAAN, is executive director of the Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare, which served as the lead foundation for the Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) project, Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses (RIBN).

As PIN holds its final national meeting this week, the Human Capital Blog is featuring posts from PIN partners about the program’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities. PIN is an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

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Darlene Curley

Human Capital Blog: Why did the Jonas Center decide to become a part of PIN? What were your goals for the project?

Darlene Curley: There were three things that were attractive about PIN. First, there was this project itself, which was developing a pathway for associate degree to baccalaureate nurses. That’s critical for building a highly educated workforce and a pipeline for preparing the next generation of faculty. The second reason was the partnership funding model. It related to the Jonas Center’s philosophy that we should be funding projects together with others in nursing, but also in interdisciplinary models for health. The third reason was the process of bringing stakeholders together in regions, which was critical. We knew that if we could bring nurse educators, students and other stakeholders together to work on the RIBN project, that group could stay together and work on other projects that were important to nursing and health care as they came along. The third reason was the process of bringing stakeholders together in regions, which was critical. We knew that if we could bring nurse educators, students and other stakeholders together to work on the RIBN project, that group could stay together and work on other projects that were important to nursing and health care as they came along.

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Jun 12 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Alzheimer’s disease, violence against women, drug marketing, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

Jason Karlawish, MD, participated in the design of new research that offers “an opportunity to study the future of the way we’re going to think about, talk about and live with the risks of Alzheimer’s disease,” he tells the Associated Press. The study is aimed at testing an experimental drug to see if it can protect seniors who are healthy but whose brains “harbor silent signs” of risk, such as a sticky build-up of proteins that can be a precursor to Alzheimer’s. Karlawish is an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient. Read more about his work on Alzheimer’s disease here and here.

The work of RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumni Ted Gayer, PhD, and Michael Greenstone, PhD, is featured in an Economist article about incorporating into federal cost-benefit analyses the global benefits of regulation to reduce carbon emissions, rather than benefits that accrue only to the United States. Agencies conduct such analyses before promulgating regulations to test whether the estimated benefits of a regulation exceed the estimated costs. Typically, estimated benefits include only those that accrue to the United States, but because global warming reaches far beyond U.S. borders, the Obama Administration’s calculations include global benefits. Greenstone was also recently cited in the New York Times.

Chris Uggen, PhD, an RWJF Investigator Award recipient, writes about the decline in the incidence of sexual violence and intimate partner violence against women since 1993 in a Pacific Standard article. Rates of sexual violence and intimate partner violence decreased from almost 10 per 1,000 in 1994 to 3.2 per 1,000 in 2012, Uggen writes. While those numbers are encouraging, “misogyny and violence against women remain enormous social problems—on our college campuses and in the larger society,” he says. Uggen’s post also appeared on Sociological Images, a Pacific Standard partner site.

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May 28 2014
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My Greatest Reward: Watching High School Seniors Grow into University-Level Nursing Students

Kelly Andrews Cleaton, MAEd, is a Student Success Advocate (SSA) in eastern North Carolina for Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses (RIBN), which aims to improve the health and health outcomes of North Carolinians by increasing the educational preparation and diversity of the nursing workforce. RIBN is supported by Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future, a partnership of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to support the capacity, involvement, and leadership of local foundations to advance the nursing profession in their own communities, and by Academic Progression in Nursing (APIN), an RWJF-supported initiative to advance state and regional strategies to create a more highly educated nursing workforce.

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I began my career as a first grade teacher because I love working with students and watching them grow over time. The next stop in my career was at East Carolina University (ECU), where I worked with students who wanted to become teachers. During my work there, I decided that I really enjoyed watching older students develop into their professions.

Quite by accident one day, I saw an online advertisement for a position as an SSA for RIBN, and it seemed like the perfect fit for me. I absolutely love traveling to high schools in eastern North Carolina and being able to talk to students about the RIBN program. The excited look in their eyes when I tell them there is an affordable way to get their bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) degree is priceless. I enjoy working with five community colleges and putting everything together like the pieces of a puzzle.

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May 8 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: How breast cancer treatment affects patients’ lives, nurses improving mental health care, male victims of sexual assault, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

Experts are looking at how treatment for breast cancer affects patients’ lives, HealthDay reports. A study by Reshma Jagsi, MD, PhD, an RWJF Physician Faculty Scholars alumna, finds that women who undergo chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer are more likely to end up unemployed than patients whose treatment does not include chemotherapy. Four years after treatment for early stage breast cancer, the study found, more than one-third of those who had chemotherapy were out of work, compared to just over one-quarter of women who had other treatments. “Many of us realize the chemotherapy is going to knock the wind out of your sails temporarily. We [as doctors] have tended to assume women bounced back, and the results here suggest that’s not the case,” Jagsi said. The HealthDay article was republished in U.S. News & World Report, WebMD, and Medicinenet.com, among other outlets.

In the latest edition of the Health Affairs “Conversations” podcast series, Sherry Glied, PhD, recipient of an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research, discusses lessons learned from the first open enrollment period of the Affordable Care Act. She and other experts also discuss Medicaid expansion, and payment and delivery reforms.

Children of single mothers who unexpectedly lose their jobs suffer severe negative repercussions well into their adult years, according to a study co-authored by Jennie Brand, PhD, MS, an RWJF Health & Society Scholars alumna. They are less likely to graduate from high school and college, and more likely to endure depression, the LA Times reports. Additionally, “[t]he kids, by virtue of having less education and having some social psychological issues, could themselves be at greater risk of job loss in the future,” Brand said. “That’s a concern too, that we could potentially see an inter-generational transmission of job instability.” 

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Mar 25 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The March 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the March issue.

Nurses Need Residency Programs Too, Experts Say
Health care experts, including the Institute of Medicine in its report on the future of nursing, tout nurse residency programs as a solution to high turnover among new graduate nurses. Now, more hospitals are finding that these programs reduce turnover, improve quality, and save money. Success stories include Seton Healthcare Family in Austin, Texas, which launched a residency program to help recent nursing school graduates transition into clinical practice. Now, three out of four new graduate nurses make it to the two-year point, and five or six new nurse graduates apply for each vacant position.

Iowa Nurses Build Affordable, Online Nurse Residency Program
Some smaller health care facilities, especially in rural areas, cannot afford to launch nurse residency programs to help new nurses transition into clinical practice. A nursing task force in Iowa has developed an innovative solution: an online nurse residency program that all health care facilities in the state—and potentially across the country—can use for a modest fee. The task force was organized by the Iowa Action Coalition and supported by an RWJF State Implementation Program grant.

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May 25 2012
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"We Knew the Need Was Significant": Nurse Leadership by Example

Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN), a partnership between the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the Northwest Health Foundation, devoted the latest issue of its PIN Point newsletter to the topic of leadership and featured the Leading Toward Tomorrow Project, which cultivates nurse leaders in southeast Michigan, with a primary focus on geriatric care. Below, three project leaders weigh in on what led them to tackle leadership development and what they’ve learned along the way.

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Why does your organization see nursing leadership as an area worthy of investment?

Elizabeth Sullivan, MPA, vice president for community investment at the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan: We felt it was important to build the nursing workforce and to do it in a way, in this particular project, that supports retention and mobility of nurses. We knew that the need was significant in southeast Michigan, and we knew it was important to do this with nurses in acute and long-term care settings. Our interest was working with novice nurses who found themselves in management positions and were working in care settings that serve a lot of older adults.

Carole Stacy, MA, MSN, RN, director of the Michigan Center for Nursing: On one of our nursing surveys several years ago, one of the questions was: If you’ve left a nursing job in the last two years, what was the reason? One of the answers they could select was that they had difficulty with their nurse manager or with administration. Over the course of several surveys, we kept seeing that particular response chosen in large numbers. Then we really started going out and looking at what the problem was. We found that in Michigan, we do not do a very good job of preparing people to be in nursing management. Just because they’re a good nurse, we assume they’ll have the skills needed to be a good manager. And that’s frequently not the case.

Nora Maloy, DrPH, senior program officer at the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Foundation: The Foundation has been supporting the profession of nursing since 2003, when we developed an initiative addressing the nursing shortage. That put us in touch with nurse leaders from around the state. Since then, through our nurse leader colleagues, we have seen the impact of nursing on all aspects of health care, including access, policy and quality of care.

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Feb 8 2012
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Executive Nurse Fellows Program a Springboard for Nurse Leaders

By Wanda Montalvo, MSN, ANP, RN, Chair, National Diabetes Education Program Operating Committee, RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program alumna (2004-2007), and Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future National Advisory Committee member

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The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellows (ENF) program has literally changed the trajectory of my professional achievements and personal development as a leader. The ENF program aims to prepare nurse leaders to shape the U.S. health care system and requires us to be innovative, strategic visionaries, risk takers and skillful at creating the change we want to see in our health care delivery system.

As a National Advisory Committee member of Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN), I have been able to leverage my skills as a strategic thinker to help partners see the connection between their projects and the potential impact they have on their communities. As an advisor to the program, there is a great sense of responsibility because our recommendations impact funding decisions, partnership expansion, and innovative projects.

I view myself as a nurse leader who is able to listen well and be nimble during collaboration with partners and who is able to identify key points while remaining focused on the end game. The ENF program prepared me to be politically savvy and skillful at interacting with key leaders to solve problems while using “on the ground” experience to expand projects.

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