Category Archives: Nurse Faculty Scholars

Dec 8 2014
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At the Crossroads of Risk and Resiliency: Averting High School Dropouts

Karen Johnson, PhD, RN, is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholar and an assistant professor at the University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing. Her research focuses on vulnerable youth. The first RWJF Scholars Forum: Disparities, Resilience, and Building a Culture of Health was held last week. The conversation continues here on the RWJF Human Capital Blog.

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As Americans, we love stories about people who beat the odds and achieve success. We flock to movie theaters to watch inspiring tales—many times based on true stories—of resilient young people who have overcome unthinkable adversities (e.g., abuse, growing up in impoverished, high-crime neighborhoods) to grow into healthy and happy adults. Antwone Fisher, The Blind Side, Precious, and Lean On Me are just a few of my personal favorites that highlight the very real struggles faced by adolescents like those I have worked with as a public health nurse. My work with adolescent mothers and now as an adolescent health researcher has convinced me of the critical importance of focusing on promoting health and resilience among adolescents at-risk for school dropout.

Karen Johnson

How often do we as a society really sit down outside the movie theater or walls of academia and talk about why these young people are at risk for poor health and social outcomes in the first place, or what it would take to help them rise above adversity? If we look closely at the storylines of resilient youth, we will notice a number of similarities. Being resilient does not happen by chance: it takes personal resolve from the individual—something our American culture has long celebrated. And it takes a collective commitment from society to maintain conditions that empower young people to be resilient, and that is something that we as a society do not recognize or invest in nearly as often.  

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Dec 2 2014
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Stress and Family Support – Two Important Social Determinants of Health for Hispanic/Latino Communities

Rosa M. Gonzalez-Guarda, PhD, RN, CPH, FAAN, is an assistant professor at the University of Miami, School of Nursing & Health Studies and an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholars program. On Friday, December 5, she will be a panelist at the RWJF Scholars Forum: Disparities, Resilience, and Building a Culture of Health. Learn more.

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My research has focused on understanding and addressing behavioral and mental health disparities experienced by Hispanic/Latino communities. Although I initiated my research looking at substance abuse, violence, HIV and mental health as separate conditions that often co-occurred in marginalized communities, I soon realized that these conditions were just symptoms of an underlying phenomena— something my colleagues and I refer to as the Syndemic factor.

Rosa Gonzalez-Guarda

We have been studying the social determinants of the Syndemic factor in hopes of developing culturally tailored interventions that can potentially address multiple behavioral and mental health outcomes for the Hispanic/Latino community. From this research we have learned that interventions that address stress and family support offer promise for this community.

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Nov 25 2014
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All People, At Any Age or Ability, Have Resilient Potential

Sarah L. Szanton, PhD, ANP, FAAN, is an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing and an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholars program. On December 5, RWJF will explore this topic further at its first Scholars Forum: Disparities, Resilience, and Building a Culture of Health. Learn more about it.

Sarah L. Szanton

Resilience is not just an individual character trait. There are resilient families, communities, and societies. 

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Within the individual, there are resilient organs, cells, and genetic expressions. Although many people who experience health disparities are resilient on the individual level—they are optimistic, committed, loving, bright—the groups of people who suffer from health disparities (such as non-English speakers, racial and ethnic minorities, and those living in poverty) draw on their personal resilience daily, but suffer from reduced contact with the resilient potential of communities and society overall. 

To me, building a Culture of Health means developing multiple layers of resilient possibilities so that each person’s cells, organs, families, communities, and society are able to respond to stressors, challenges, and opportunities with resilient potential.

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Nov 13 2014
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Addressing the Needs of Female Veterans Who Have Experienced Violence and Harassment

Jacquelyn Campbell, PhD, RN, FAAN, is director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholars program and Anna D. Wolf chair and professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing.  Angela Amar, PhD, RN, FAAN, is an associate professor at the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing at Emory University and an alumna of the RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars program.

Jacquelyn Campbell Jacquelyn Campbell

As two scholars who have worked in research, practice and policy arenas around issues of gender-based violence for years, we honor our veterans this week by paying tribute to the Pentagon and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for addressing intimate partner and sexual violence among active duty and returning military and their families, and urge continued system-wide involvement and innovative solutions.  

In our work, we’ve heard outrageous, painful stories. One female servicemember explained to Angela why she was ignoring the sexual harassment she experienced. She knew that hearing that she was inferior because she was a woman, being called “Kitty” instead of her name, and having the number 69 used in place of any relevant number was harassing. She knew it was wrong. But she had decided that she would not let it bother her. I can acknowledge that he is a jerk, but I can’t let that affect me.  

Angela Amar Angela Amar

I can’t let his behavior define me as a person. On some level this may seem like an accurate way of dealing with a problem person. However, sexual harassment isn’t just about one obnoxious person. Not telling the story doesn’t make the behavior go away. Rather, it sends the message that the behavior is acceptable and that sexist comments are a normal part of the lexicon of male/female interactions.

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Nov 5 2014
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Teen Take Heart

Steven J. Palazzo, PhD, MN, RN, CNE, is an assistant professor in the College of Nursing at Seattle University, and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholar (2013 – 2016. ) His research focuses on evaluating the effectiveness of the Teen Take Heart program in mitigating cardiovascular risk factors in at-risk high school students.

Steven Palazzo

Difficult problems demand innovative solutions. Teen Take Heart (TTH) is a program I’ve worked to develop, in partnership with The Hope Heart Institute and with support from the RWJF Nurse Faulty Scholars Program, to address locally a problem we face nationally: an alarming increase in obesity and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors among teenagers. The problem is substantial and costly in both economic and human terms. We developed TTH as a solution that could, if it proves effective in trials that begin this fall in my native Washington state, be translated to communities across the country.

The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America, released recently by the Trust for America’s Health and RWJF, makes it clear that as a nation we are not winning the battle on obesity. The report reveals that a staggering 31.8 percent of children in the United States are overweight or obese and only 25 percent get the recommended 60 minutes of daily physical activity. The report also finds that only 5 percent of school districts nationwide have a wellness program that meets the physical education time requirement.

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Oct 31 2014
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RWJF Milestones, October 2014

The following are among the many honors received recently by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, grantees and alumni:

Linda Aiken, PhD, FAAN, FRCN, RN, has won the Institute of Medicine’s Leinhard Award in recognition of her “rigorous research demonstrating the importance of nursing care and work environments in achieving safe, effective, patient-centered, and affordable health care.” The director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Aiken serves on the National Advisory Committee of the RWJF Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative and is a research manager for the Future of Nursing National Research Agenda.

A number of RWJF Scholars and Fellows were recently elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine:

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Oct 30 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Scapegoating EHRs, Ebola fears, children fighting cancer, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

In an article published in Healthcare IT News, David Blumenthal, MD, MPP, writes that health care providers may be too quick to blame Electronic Health Records (EHR) for medical errors. Blumenthal notes that EHRs are still imperfect and that improvements will take time, but argues: “There is no going back in the electronic health information revolution. No physician or hospital, however loud their complaints, has ever thrown out their EHR and returned to paper. The dissatisfaction with the technology will recede as EHRs improve, and as a new generation of young clinicians, raised in the electronic world, populates our health care system.”  Blumenthal is president of The Commonwealth Fund, former National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, and an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient.

In a blog published by the Washington Post’s “Monkey Cage,” Shana Gadarian, PhD, and her co-author write that Ebola anxiety, while potentially misplaced and harmful, is likely to have an impact on whom Americans trust to handle the disease and what kinds of policies they will support to fight it. The authors have studies society’s reactions to small pox and H1N1 flu. “In general we find that anxiety makes people more supportive of government playing an expansive role in protecting them during a health crisis ... we think our study and the current Ebola outbreak both emphasize that people will rally around experts and increase their support for policies that fight the contagion, even if they hurt civil liberties. Let us hope that the U.S. health system is ultimately worthy of the confidence the public has in it.” Gadarian is an RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumna.

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Oct 28 2014
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Health Care Workers Primed to Lead Global Response to Ebola

Timothy Landers, PhD, CNP, and Jason Farley, PhD, MPH, CRNP, are Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholars. In his work, Landers focuses on the epidemiology and prevention of antibiotic-resistant infections, including the use of hand hygiene as a means of prevention. Farley evaluates treatment outcomes in multi-drug resistant infections including tuberculosis (TB) and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in patients with HIV, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa.

Timothy Landers Timothy Landers

The recent outbreak of Ebola virus in West Africa is a stark reminder that we live in a globally connected world and that outbreaks can occur without warning. As infection prevention specialists, we are acutely aware of the risks health care workers face in caring for the public, both now and in times of relatively less chaos.

The good news is that despite media reports, nurses, physicians, infection prevention specialists and other health care workers are in an ideal position to lead the global response to this disease.

Our experience with measures to address hospital-acquired infections—isolation precautions, hand hygiene, contact tracing and public health measures—are also the same methods necessary to contain the spread of Ebola.  

Jason Farley (smaller) Jason Farley

Building on experience addressing these infections, along with recognition of the differences in Ebola virus transmission, the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) regularly updates the guidelines and is currently recommending enhanced versions of isolation precautions, including enhanced standard precautions, contact precautions, and droplet precautions. 

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Oct 28 2014
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New Cohort of RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars

Twelve talented early-career nurse faculty have been selected as the seventh cohort of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholars. The award is given to individuals who show outstanding promise as future leaders in academic nursing.

Each scholar receives a three-year $350,000 award to pursue research, leadership training in all aspects of the faculty role, and mentoring from senior faculty at his or her institution. The scholars chosen this year are using their grants to study a range of issues, from pediatric asthma to dementia care to health literacy to HIV treatment to the use of technology to improve access and outcomes for rural and uninsured individuals.

At a time when many schools of nursing are turning away qualified applicants because they do not have the faculty to teach them, RWJF’s Nurse Faculty Scholars program is helping more junior faculty succeed in, and commit to, academic careers. The program also is strengthening the academic productivity and overall excellence of nursing schools by developing the next generation of leaders in academic nursing.

Read more about the 2014 and final cohort of RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars.

Oct 17 2014
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RWJF’s Lavizzo-Mourey, Nursing Grantees Honored by American Academy of Nursing

Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), was honored by the American Academy of Nursing (AAN) yesterday, receiving the President’s Award from the venerable institution.

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The presentation was made by AAN President Diana Mason, PhD, RN, FAAN, at its conference, Transforming Health, Driving Policy Conference. Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, spoke to the assembled conference participants via video. “At the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, we like to say that nursing is in our DNA. That’s because we believe to our core that nurses are the glue that holds together our health care system across the entire continuum of an individual’s lifespan ... We envision a future where all Americans realize a new and robust Culture of Health ... We cannot and we will not ever achieve a Culture of Health without the support, help and the leadership of nurses.”

“I am grateful to be honored with this award,” Lavizzo-Mourey continued. “And know that you are all committed to transforming health, leading change, influencing policy, and ultimately improving the nation’s health ... And I am humbled to be in the company of this year’s FAAN inductees and the Living Legend honorees who will be recognized tonight. Congratulations to everyone – and a shout-out to those who are RWJF scholars, fellows and alumni.”

Some 170 people will be inducted as fellows of AAN (FAANs) tomorrow. They include four RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows, eight RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars, two RWJF Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative investigators, and Mary Dickow, MPA, the statewide director of the California Action Coalition of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action.

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