Category Archives: Nurse Faculty Scholars

Oct 31 2014
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RWJF Milestones, October 2014

The following are among the many honors received recently by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, grantees and alumni:

Linda Aiken, PhD, FAAN, FRCN, RN, has won the Institute of Medicine’s Leinhard Award in recognition of her “rigorous research demonstrating the importance of nursing care and work environments in achieving safe, effective, patient-centered, and affordable health care.” The director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Aiken serves on the National Advisory Committee of the RWJF Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative and is a research manager for the Future of Nursing National Research Agenda.

A number of RWJF Scholars and Fellows were recently elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine:

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Oct 30 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Scapegoating EHRs, Ebola fears, children fighting cancer, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

In an article published in Healthcare IT News, David Blumenthal, MD, MPP, writes that health care providers may be too quick to blame Electronic Health Records (EHR) for medical errors. Blumenthal notes that EHRs are still imperfect and that improvements will take time, but argues: “There is no going back in the electronic health information revolution. No physician or hospital, however loud their complaints, has ever thrown out their EHR and returned to paper. The dissatisfaction with the technology will recede as EHRs improve, and as a new generation of young clinicians, raised in the electronic world, populates our health care system.”  Blumenthal is president of The Commonwealth Fund, former National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, and an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient.

In a blog published by the Washington Post’s “Monkey Cage,” Shana Gadarian, PhD, and her co-author write that Ebola anxiety, while potentially misplaced and harmful, is likely to have an impact on whom Americans trust to handle the disease and what kinds of policies they will support to fight it. The authors have studies society’s reactions to small pox and H1N1 flu. “In general we find that anxiety makes people more supportive of government playing an expansive role in protecting them during a health crisis ... we think our study and the current Ebola outbreak both emphasize that people will rally around experts and increase their support for policies that fight the contagion, even if they hurt civil liberties. Let us hope that the U.S. health system is ultimately worthy of the confidence the public has in it.” Gadarian is an RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumna.

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Oct 28 2014
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Health Care Workers Primed to Lead Global Response to Ebola

Timothy Landers, PhD, CNP, and Jason Farley, PhD, MPH, CRNP, are Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholars. In his work, Landers focuses on the epidemiology and prevention of antibiotic-resistant infections, including the use of hand hygiene as a means of prevention. Farley evaluates treatment outcomes in multi-drug resistant infections including tuberculosis (TB) and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in patients with HIV, with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa.

Timothy Landers Timothy Landers

The recent outbreak of Ebola virus in West Africa is a stark reminder that we live in a globally connected world and that outbreaks can occur without warning. As infection prevention specialists, we are acutely aware of the risks health care workers face in caring for the public, both now and in times of relatively less chaos.

The good news is that despite media reports, nurses, physicians, infection prevention specialists and other health care workers are in an ideal position to lead the global response to this disease.

Our experience with measures to address hospital-acquired infections—isolation precautions, hand hygiene, contact tracing and public health measures—are also the same methods necessary to contain the spread of Ebola.  

Jason Farley (smaller) Jason Farley

Building on experience addressing these infections, along with recognition of the differences in Ebola virus transmission, the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) regularly updates the guidelines and is currently recommending enhanced versions of isolation precautions, including enhanced standard precautions, contact precautions, and droplet precautions. 

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Oct 28 2014
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New Cohort of RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars

Twelve talented early-career nurse faculty have been selected as the seventh cohort of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholars. The award is given to individuals who show outstanding promise as future leaders in academic nursing.

Each scholar receives a three-year $350,000 award to pursue research, leadership training in all aspects of the faculty role, and mentoring from senior faculty at his or her institution. The scholars chosen this year are using their grants to study a range of issues, from pediatric asthma to dementia care to health literacy to HIV treatment to the use of technology to improve access and outcomes for rural and uninsured individuals.

At a time when many schools of nursing are turning away qualified applicants because they do not have the faculty to teach them, RWJF’s Nurse Faculty Scholars program is helping more junior faculty succeed in, and commit to, academic careers. The program also is strengthening the academic productivity and overall excellence of nursing schools by developing the next generation of leaders in academic nursing.

Read more about the 2014 and final cohort of RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars.

Oct 17 2014
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RWJF’s Lavizzo-Mourey, Nursing Grantees Honored by American Academy of Nursing

Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), was honored by the American Academy of Nursing (AAN) yesterday, receiving the President’s Award from the venerable institution.

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The presentation was made by AAN President Diana Mason, PhD, RN, FAAN, at its conference, Transforming Health, Driving Policy Conference. Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, spoke to the assembled conference participants via video. “At the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, we like to say that nursing is in our DNA. That’s because we believe to our core that nurses are the glue that holds together our health care system across the entire continuum of an individual’s lifespan ... We envision a future where all Americans realize a new and robust Culture of Health ... We cannot and we will not ever achieve a Culture of Health without the support, help and the leadership of nurses.”

“I am grateful to be honored with this award,” Lavizzo-Mourey continued. “And know that you are all committed to transforming health, leading change, influencing policy, and ultimately improving the nation’s health ... And I am humbled to be in the company of this year’s FAAN inductees and the Living Legend honorees who will be recognized tonight. Congratulations to everyone – and a shout-out to those who are RWJF scholars, fellows and alumni.”

Some 170 people will be inducted as fellows of AAN (FAANs) tomorrow. They include four RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows, eight RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars, two RWJF Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative investigators, and Mary Dickow, MPA, the statewide director of the California Action Coalition of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action.

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Sep 18 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Antibiotic overuse, sexual assault nurse examiners, diaper banks, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient Anthony So, MD, MPA, co-authors a piece in the News & Observer (Raleigh, North Carolina) about the need to reduce the overuse of antibiotics, in both humans and animals. Overuse accelerates the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that half of human antibiotic use and much animal antibiotic use is unnecessary, the article says. So calls for public policies that create incentives for farmers to decrease use of antibiotics and that limit antibiotic use in animals to disease treatment, rather than growth-promotion or as a substitute for hygiene and infection-control.

In Chicago, most children with asthma or food allergies do not have a health management form on file at school, leaving their schools without information they might need in emergencies, according to a study by RWJF Physician Faculty Scholars alumna Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH that was covered by Reuters Health. Researchers analyzed 2012-13 school year data on more than 400,000 Chicago schoolchildren, including 18,287 with asthma and 4,250 with a food allergy. Only a quarter of the asthmatic students and half of those with a food allergy had a health management plan on file. The study was also covered by The Chicago Tribune, Fox News, The Baltimore Sun, and Red Orbit, among other outlets.

RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars alumna Angela Frederick Amar, PhD, RN, FAAN, publishes an op-ed on Talking Points Memo about the report from the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault, Not Alone. Amar notes that effective response to campus sexual assault should include medical care for survivors, and that Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANEs) are trained to tend to the medical and emotional needs of survivors and collect forensic evidence. In other institutions with high rates of sexual violence, such as the military, SANEs are considered an essential part of treatment for victims of sexual violence, Amar writes.

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Sep 11 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Mental health and returning service members, children of incarcerated parents, nurse turnover, more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

When reserve service members return to civilian life, such stresses as marriage and health care problems are more likely to trigger drinking problems than traumatic events that occurred during deployment, according to a study reported by Fox News. When it comes to the “long-term mental health for National Guard members, what matters is what happens after they come home,” said lead author Magdalena Cerdá, PhD, MPH, an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumna. “Financial difficulties, re-integrating, difficulties accessing quality health care, all of those seem to matter.” But deployment stress also has an impact. “[T]he more traumatic events they are exposed to during or after combat, the more problems they have in daily life when they come home,” she said. RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient Sandro Galea, MD, MPH, DrPH, co-authored the study. Health Canal also reported on it.

An estimated 17.5 percent of newly licensed RNs leave their first nursing job within the first year, and one in three leave within two years, according to research conducted by RWJF’s RN Work Project. Advance for Nurses quotes co-directors Christine T. Kovner, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Carol Brewer, PhD, RN, FAAN. “One of the biggest problems we face in trying to assess the impact of nurse turnover on our health care system as a whole is that there’s not a single, agreed-upon definition of turnover,” Kovner said. “A high rate of turnover at a hospital, if it's voluntary, could be problematic,” Brewer added, “but if it’s involuntary or if nurses are moving within the hospital to another unit or position, that tells a very different story.” Nurse.com also covered the study.

Having incarcerated parents is associated with significant health problems and behavioral issues, and may be more harmful to children’s health than divorce or the death of a parent, USA Today reports. “These kids are saddled with disadvantages,” said Kristin Turney, PhD, author of the study that reached those conclusions. She is an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumna. “They’re not only dealing with parental incarceration, but also mental health issues.” The study found that having a parent in prison was associated with such conditions as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, speech or language problems, and developmental delays. Turney’s study was also covered by US News and World Report, Salon, Psych Central, Healthline and Mother Jones, among other outlets. 

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Sep 4 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: The nursing shortage, ADHD, meaningful online communications and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

NBC 2 (Buffalo, New York) interviewed Carol S. Brewer, PhD, RN, FAAN, co-director of RWJF’s RN Work Project, for a story about the nursing shortage and job prospects for nurses early in their careers. “We are not seeing as much demand for brand new graduates,” Brewer said. However, the anticipated retirement of many older nurses and the increasing demand for health care as a result of the Affordable Care Act could combine to create a 19-percent increase in demand for nurses in the near future, Brewer said. In the meantime, she suggests that new nurses be willing to relocate and look for nursing jobs in rural communities, where demand is greater.

It is important to keep media and public focus on the Affordable Care Act, Jake Haselswerdt, PhD, an RWJF Scholar in Health Policy Research, tells the Independent Voters Network website, because some states are still blocking full implementation of the law. “In order for the more stubborn states to move forward with implementation and expanding care, there may need to be some continued pressure,” he said. “That’s going to require the media to pay attention to the big disparities that are emerging between states that tried to implement the law and those that resisted.”

Tina Bloom, PhD, RN, an RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholar, led training for nurses in Columbia, Missouri, aimed at helping them identify the risk factors and symptoms of domestic violence, and then to support victims, ABC17 News reports. The training is consistent with preventive care provisions in the Affordable Care Act, the article says. Among other things, Bloom teaches nurses to look for certain types of injuries and for issues in patients’ medical histories that do not make sense.

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Sep 3 2014
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Accepting the Challenge: What the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge Can Teach Us About Public Health

Elizabeth Gross Cohn, PhD, RN, is director of the Center for Health Innovation at Adelphi University, an adjunct professor at the Columbia University School of Nursing, and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholar.

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It only took 24 hours for the hospital unit where I work to complete the Ice Bucket Challenge. My colleagues and I were quick to dump ice water on our heads and publicly post a video of it to YouTube. Compare that to the speed at which we adapt other initiatives—even those that benefit our own health.

Why the difference? What is prompting people to action and, more importantly, what can RWJF learn from this campaign as it works to advance a Culture of Health?

In case you’ve been unplugged over the past several weeks, the Ice Bucket Challenge started in golf and baseball but has spread virally. As of today, it has raised $100 million for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).  Participation begins when you are challenged on social media to—within 24 hours—publicly accept, acknowledge the challenger by name, pour ice water over your head in as dramatic a method as you can imagine or afford, challenge two or three others to participate, and post the results to YouTube.  This campaign has been embraced by the general public, celebrities, grandmothers, babies, and teams of teachers, firefighters, nurses, teachers and others.  

We public health professionals can learn some important lessons about delivering information and impelling action from this extraordinary cultural phenomenon. Here are five factors that seem most potent to me. Do you see others?

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Aug 28 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Medical marijuana’s unanticipated benefits, infant sleep pods, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

States that have legalized medical marijuana have seen nearly 25 percent fewer deaths from overdoses involving prescription painkillers than states that have not, according to a study led by Marcus Bachhuber, MD. ABC News reports on it, noting that 23 states and the District of Columbia have such laws. Researchers found that while opioid overdose rates continued to climb, the increase was much slower in states with medical marijuana laws, resulting in 25 percent fewer deaths from opioid overdose. “This study raises the possibility that there is an unintended public health benefit of medical marijuana laws, but we still need to collect more information to confirm or refute what we’ve found,” says Bachhuber, an RWJF/Veterans Administration Clinical Scholar at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Outlets covering Bachhuber’s study include CNN, Washington Post, Business Insider, Health Day and Vox.

An infant “sleep pod” designed by Jennifer Doering, PhD, RN, is one of 11 projects funded through new grants from the University of Wisconsin Extension and the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports. The $25,000 Ideadvance grants are intended to move good ideas more quickly to the marketplace. Doering’s I-SleepPod, developed as a result of her work in the RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars program, would allow an infant to sleep next to an adult while remaining safe, thanks in part to an alarm that wakes the adult in the event of an unsafe sleeping position. “We designed the sleep pod to minimize hazards because, if we don’t move in that direction of reducing sleep-related infant deaths, then [society] is essentially saying it’s acceptable to have 600 babies die every year that way,” Doering said.

Nutrition rating systems in supermarkets may encourage shoppers to purchase less junk food, according to a study led by John Cawley, PhD, an RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumnus and Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient. The study coupled sales data from Hannaford Supermarkets in the northeastern United States from January 2005 to December 2007 with the Guiding Stars nutritional rating system. The ratings system assigns zero to three stars to food items, based on their nutritional value. Researchers found that sales of less healthy foods—such as highly processed snack foods—fell by 8.31 percent when branded with a low nutrition rating, while healthy food purchases rose by 1.39 percent, Medical Xpress reports.

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