Category Archives: Interprofessional Education

Nov 27 2013
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The November 2013 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of RWJF’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. These are some of the stories in the November issue:

Push for Interprofessional Education Picks Up Steam

For decades, experts have called for more team-based care but the movement has gained traction in recent years with more health professions schools incorporating interprofessional education into their coursework. Proponents say this kind of education will prepare students to practice in coordinated, well-functioning health care teams, which in turn will help meet increasing, and increasingly complex, patient needs. Officials in several professions are considering making interprofessional education and training a requirement for accreditation for health professions colleges and universities.

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May 31 2011
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New on RWJF.org Human Capital

Each week, the Human Capital section of www.rwjf.org features in-depth stories, features and briefs about the work of the many grantees this portfolio supports. In recent weeks, stories include:

With Simple Tool, Primary Care Providers May be Able to Identify, Refer Foster Care Youth with Social and Emotional Problems

A study by RWJF Physician Faculty Scholar alumna Sandra Jee, M.D., M.P.H., shows that a short survey of youth and foster parents at the beginning of routine clinical visits can help identify mental health problems, as well as strengths.

RWJF Health & Society Scholars Present Research at National Institutes of Health During Annual Meeting

Over the course of several days in May, each of the current scholars presented on their ongoing research, and got feedback and ideas from fellow scholars. In a highlight of the session, the scholars visited the National Institutes of Health to hear remarks from Sir Michael Marmot, M.B.B.S., M.P.H., Ph.D., F.R.C.P., an international leader in the field of health disparities.

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May 25 2011
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Third in a Series: The Imperative for Interprofessional Education

On May 10, the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) released two groundbreaking reports that recommend competencies for interprofessional health education to promote collaborative, team-based care, and strategies to implement them. This post is the third in a series in which the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s (RWJF’s) Human Capital Blog speaks to leaders of this initiative. This interview is with George E. Thibault, M.D., president of the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation.

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Human Capital Blog: What matters most about the report you released on May 10?

George Thibault: The leadership and consensus of the six associations [the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, American Dental Education Association, Association of American Medical Colleges, and Association of Schools of Public Health] representing the schools of the six health professions are powerful and moves this issue into the mainstream. In addition, the public-private partnership of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the foundation world gives it added impetus.

HCB: How do you want to see it used?

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May 23 2011
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Second in a Series: The Imperative for Interprofessional Education

On May 10, the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) released two groundbreaking reports that recommend competencies for interprofessional health education to promote collaborative, team-based care, and strategies to implement them. This post is the second in a series in which the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s (RWJF’s) Human Capital Blog speaks to leaders of this initiative. This interview is with Carol A. Aschenbrener, M.D., executive vice president of the Association of American Medical Colleges.

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Human Capital Blog: What matters most about the report you released on May 10?

Carol Aschenbrener: The consensus between the six collaborative professions and the degree of agreement with competencies proposed by single professions here and in other nations gives high credibility to our recent effort in proposing these competencies and calling for broad-based implementation. The immediate reaction from many reinforces our conviction that we are at a critical mass for implementation in health professions education.

HCB: How do you want to see it used?

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May 17 2011
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First in a Series: The Imperative for Interprofessional Education

On May 10, the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) released two groundbreaking reports that recommend competencies for interprofessional health education to promote collaborative, team-based care, and strategies to implement them. This post is the first in a series in which the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s (RWJF’s) Human Capital Blog speaks to leaders of this initiative. The first interview is with RWJF senior program officer Maryjoan Ladden, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N.

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Human Capital Blog: What matters most about the report you released last week?

Maryjoan Ladden: It provides a real roadmap for the change we need in health professions education, in order to make real a vision of interdisciplinary health care that is more patient-centered, higher quality and safer.

This report wasn’t created by just one organization or person, or by just one group. It results from a collaborative effort between government, funders, educators, health system leaders, providers—all of whom recognized that something fundamental needs to change in the way we are educating health care professionals.

Beyond issuing this report, we all stand ready to play a role in making that change. That’s why we didn’t just issue a report detailing core competencies but rather, a second piece with strategies for action to ensure that they are widely used. To me, that is exciting because, as a nurse practitioner I’ve seen first-hand the challenges associated with collaboration – especially when health professionals are thrown together for the first time in a busy practice setting and have to work together without any preparation to do so. And I know too well the harm to patients when their health care providers do not work well together. We need to turn that around and we need to do it now.

HCB: How do you want to see it used?

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