Category Archives: Community Health Leaders

Sep 18 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Antibiotic overuse, sexual assault nurse examiners, diaper banks, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient Anthony So, MD, MPA, co-authors a piece in the News & Observer (Raleigh, North Carolina) about the need to reduce the overuse of antibiotics, in both humans and animals. Overuse accelerates the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that half of human antibiotic use and much animal antibiotic use is unnecessary, the article says. So calls for public policies that create incentives for farmers to decrease use of antibiotics and that limit antibiotic use in animals to disease treatment, rather than growth-promotion or as a substitute for hygiene and infection-control.

In Chicago, most children with asthma or food allergies do not have a health management form on file at school, leaving their schools without information they might need in emergencies, according to a study by RWJF Physician Faculty Scholars alumna Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH that was covered by Reuters Health. Researchers analyzed 2012-13 school year data on more than 400,000 Chicago schoolchildren, including 18,287 with asthma and 4,250 with a food allergy. Only a quarter of the asthmatic students and half of those with a food allergy had a health management plan on file. The study was also covered by The Chicago Tribune, Fox News, The Baltimore Sun, and Red Orbit, among other outlets.

RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars alumna Angela Frederick Amar, PhD, RN, FAAN, publishes an op-ed on Talking Points Memo about the report from the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault, Not Alone. Amar notes that effective response to campus sexual assault should include medical care for survivors, and that Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANEs) are trained to tend to the medical and emotional needs of survivors and collect forensic evidence. In other institutions with high rates of sexual violence, such as the military, SANEs are considered an essential part of treatment for victims of sexual violence, Amar writes.

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Jun 19 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Debt and health, tax exemption controversy, peer influence on adolescent smokers, and more

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

In the context of the Obama administration’s efforts to ease student loan debt, TIME reports on a study by RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumna Elizabeth Sweet, PhD, that explores the toll debt takes on the borrower’s physical health. Past studies have focused on mental health issues, TIME writes, but Sweet’s research links debt not just to mental health, but also to high blood pressure and general health problems. Sweet says the problem has long-term implications. “These health issues are a warning for more health problems down the road,” she says, “so we have to think about this as a long-term phenomenon.” Forbes also highlights her research.

A Medscape story about a study that shows a direct correlation between vaccinating health care personnel against influenza and reducing cases of flu in the community quotes Mary Lou Manning, PhD, RN, CPNP, an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows alumna. “We now actually have evidence indicating that higher health care worker vaccination rates in hospitals are having a community effect; they’re actually resulting in lower rates of influenza in the community. That’s remarkably exciting,” says Manning, who is president-elect of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. The article is available here (free login required).

Modern Healthcare reports on federal efforts to address concerns about tax exemption for certain nonprofit hospitals, citing research by Gary Young, JD, PhD, recipient of an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research. In order to obtain tax-exempt status, the Affordable Care Act requires nonprofit hospitals to track and report the charity care and community benefits they provide. Young found wide variation in the contributions of nonprofit hospitals. “The current standards and approach to tax exemption for hospitals is raising concerns about a lack of accountability for hospitals,” he says, and creating problems because “hospitals don’t really know what’s expected of them.” The Internal Revenue Service has proposed a rule to address the issue. (Free registration is required to view the article.)

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Jun 5 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Diversity in the nursing workforce, barriers to breast-feeding, child maltreatment, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

HealthLeaders Media features New Careers in Nursing (NCIN), a joint initiative of RWJF and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) that is increasing diversity in the nursing workforce. “The reason [increasing diversity] is important, of course, is because the population of nursing does not really reflect the population at large,” Polly Bednash, PhD, RN, FAAN, says in the story. “We are now working very aggressively to have the number of people entering the profession look more like the population of the United States.” Bednash is NCIN program director and AACN’s CEO.

In an opinion piece for the Philadelphia Inquirer, Jooyoung Lee, PhD, writes that, in the aftermath of mass shootings, the media and public often focus chiefly on the shooters and forget about the families of those slain. “Instead of fixating on the shooter, or retreating into our own lives, let’s remember and honor those who are left behind. Their lives are often difficult and grinding; their grief is immeasurable. Healing from murder is rarely—if ever—a quick or complete process,” writes Lee, an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus. Read more about Lee’s work.

Living in neighborhoods with high rates of violence can affect students’ academic performance, according to a study from RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus from Patrick Sharkey, PhD. The Washington Post reports that the study found that neighborhood violence that occurred within seven days of a test appeared to reduce Black children’s performance on language arts assessments. “When violence is in the air, when the threat of violence is in the air, then it becomes something that spills over to affect not just people who are involved, but everyone who lives in the community,” Sharkey says.

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May 29 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Scandals and reforms at the VA, excluding the elderly from medical studies, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

In a Washington Post opinion piece, RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumnus Colin Moore, PhD, writes that the budding scandal over patient waiting times at regional Department of Veterans’ Affairs medical centers (VA) could lead to positive reforms, if past troubles at the VA are any guide. “Throughout its history, the VA’s very public failures have shaped its development as profoundly as its successes,” Moore writes. For example, previous failures led to the adoption of the 1996 Veterans’ Health Care Eligibility Reform Act, which transformed the VA by opening more outpatient clinics and embracing new ways to track and measure health care outcomes. The recent scandal involving falsified reporting on patient waiting times could lead to another cycle of much-needed improvements, Moore writes.

“Doctors are often in the dark” when prescribing medications or procedures to older patients, because the elderly are routinely excluded from medical research, Donna Zulman, MD, MS, co-writes in an opinion piece for the New York Times. Studies have shown that 40 percent of medical research excluded individuals over the age of 65. “Clinicians consequently have to extrapolate findings about diseases as diverse as cancer, heart attacks, and mental illness from studies of younger and often healthier people, potentially putting their older patients at risk.” Older patients should be included in medical studies because age can affect the way a person’s body processes medication and other treatments, according to Zulman, an RWJF Clinical Scholars alumna.

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Feb 11 2014
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Taking a Hint from Home Hospice Care to Help Those Who Die in Hospitals

Adopting best practices from home-based hospice care in the inpatient environment can reduce suffering at the end of life, according to a study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.  Researchers at the Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of Alabama at Birmingham said the study is the first to show that palliative care techniques usually used in home settings can have an impact on those who die in hospitals.

The Best Practices for End-of-Life Care for Our Nation’s Veterans (BEACON) trial was conducted at six Veterans Affairs Medical Centers from 2005 to 2011 and involved training more than 1,620 staff members in aspects of care for more than 6,000 dying patients. Although focused on veterans, the study can have a wider impact, researchers said, because most Americans will die in the inpatient setting of a hospital or nursing home.

“We only die once, and therefore there is only one opportunity to provide excellent care to a patient in the last days of life,” wrote lead author F. Amos Bailey, MD, director of the Safe Harbor Palliative Care Program at the Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, professor in the Division of Gerontology, Geriatrics and Palliative Care at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, and a 2000 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Community Health Leader. “The keys to excellent end-of-life care are recognizing the imminently dying patient, communicating the prognosis, identifying goals of care, and anticipating and palliating symptoms. Since it is not possible to predict with certainty which symptoms will arise, it is prudent to have a flexible plan ready.”

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Oct 31 2013
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Human Capital News Roundup: The cost of disposable diapers, toxins in fish, fast food calories, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

WNYC in New York City broadcast an interview with RWJF Community Health Leader Joanne Goldblum about families reusing disposable diapers due to economic hardship. Goldblum, who is founder and executive director of the National Diaper Bank Network, conducted a study that shows how the practice leads to a range of problems for families living in poverty.

When it comes to digital health and new ways to deliver care, the focus should be on the consumer and improving outcomes, not on the technology, according to experts at a recent Connected Health Symposium in Boston, Massachusetts. Mobile Health News reports that Propeller Health (formerly Asthmapolis) CEO David Van Sickle, PhD, MA, an RWJF Health & Society Scholars alumnus, pressed for greater emphasis on outcomes.  Read more about Van Sickle’s work here and here.

An American Thoracic Society panel of experts, including RWJF Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative (INQRI) grantee Richard Mularski, MD, is calling for better care for those who suffer severe shortness of breath due to advanced lung and heart disease. The Annals of the American Thoracic Society reports that the panel recommends patients and providers develop individualized actions plans to keep episodes from becoming emergencies, Medical Xpress reports.

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Oct 16 2013
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Illinois Governor Declares “Carmen Velásquez Day”

For nearly 25 years, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Community Health Leader Carmen Velásquez, MA, has helped members of Chicago’s immigrant community access the health care they need. She founded the Alivio Medical Center in 1988, which has now grown to six locations that serve 25,000 patients annually. Two more clinics are slated to open later this year.

In recognition of her work, Illinois Governor Pat Quinn proclaimed October 2, 2013 “Carmen Velásquez Day.” At an event celebrating Latino Heritage Month at the National Museum of Mexican Art in Chicago, Quinn called Velásquez “a true pioneer in public health policy and health care affordability.”

“As the immigrant population in the Pilsen neighborhood grew in the 1980s, Carmen Velásquez was among the first to see the crying need for a health clinic, so she went out and built Alivio Medical Center,” he said. “Hundreds of thousands of Illinoisans are alive today thanks to her, proving that one person truly can make a difference.”

Read more about Velásquez’ work.
Read a news release about “Carmen Velásquez Day.”

Oct 10 2013
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Human Capital News Roundup: Assaults on college campuses, soldiers at risk for suicide, food safety, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

Angela Amar, PhD, RN, FAAN, an RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars alumna whose research focuses on sexual assault and partner violence, wrote an op-ed for Aljazeera about the prevalence of assaults on college campuses, and administrative failures to take effective action to stop them.

A survey by Scholars in Health Policy Research alumnus Rashawn Ray, PhD, finds that Black men are less likely to run outside if they live in predominantly white neighborhoods, Runner’s World reports, while the opposite is true for Black women—they are more likely to be active in predominantly White communities. “Black men in White neighborhoods are more cautious of how they exercise and less comfortable in those neighborhoods because many Black men have had social interactions in which they were profiled simply for being Black and male,” Ray says.

A new working paper from Scholars in Health Policy Research alumna Martha Bailey, PhD, MA, looks at the effects of increased access to contraception over the last 50 years. “Contraceptives and family planning helped boost college completion rates, labor force participation, wages, and family income for the children of parents who had access,” Business Insider reports.

Kavita Patel, MD, MSHS, an alumna of the Clinical Scholars program who worked on the Affordable Care Act as a senior advisor to White House aide Valerie Jarrett, was a guest on MSNBC’s All In With Chris Hayes to discuss the rollout of the health care reform law’s online marketplaces.

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Sep 25 2013
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Pennsylvania Adopts Law Supporting Insurance-Less Health Care Offices

Zane Gates, MD, is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Community Health Leader and medical director of Altoona Regional Partnering for Health Services in Altoona, Pennsylvania. Gates and Patrick Reilly, president of Impact Health Solutions, founded the Empower3 Center for Health program, which is the model for a new health care law in Pennsylvania.

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The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania has recently adopted a law to fund community-based clinics that can demonstrate real impact to the community with regard to increased access, reduced costs, lower emergency room (ER) visits, and improved behavioral health outcomes for the low-income working uninsured.  It is modeled on community-based clinics featuring a unique structure that I created along with Patrick Reilly, an insurance consultant from western New York:— Empower3 Center for Health program.

The model we created features an “insurance-less” office concept that allows patients to come in as frequently as needed without worrying about being billed or having any balances to pay. The program has no co-pays, deductibles or balance billing when the patients use the participating community hospital that partners with the program.  Since there is no billing at the point of service, there is more face time with the medical professionals to spend creating a true relationship that focuses on care and provides dignity to the patients seeking quality medical care. The office is open five days a week to provide access to patients as needed. 

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Sep 19 2013
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Human Capital News Roundup: Suicide prevention, psychotropic medication, Las Vegas buffets, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

Jennifer Stuber, PhD, an alumna of the RWJF Health & Society Scholars program, was a guest on KING’s New Day (Seattle, Wash.) to discuss Forefront, an organization she co-founded to advance suicide prevention through policy change, professional training, campus and school-based interventions, media outreach and ongoing evaluation. Stuber has been an advocate for suicide prevention since her husband took his own life in 2011, and supports suicide-assessment training for medical professionals as part of continuing education. Read a post Stuber wrote for the RWJF Human Capital Blog about that legislation.

Nearly 60 percent of the 5.1 million patients who were prescribed a psychotropic medication in 2009 had received no psychiatric diagnosis, according to a study led by RWJF/U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Clinical Scholar Ilse Wiechers, MD, MPP. The study also finds that 67 percent of those prescriptions were given to patients who did not receive any specialized mental health care, Medscape reports, meaning the medications were prescribed in primary care, general medical, or surgical settings.

Minnesota Public Radio and MinnPost.com report on a study co-authored by Health & Society Scholars alumni Sarah Gollust, PhD, and Jeff Niederdeppe, PhD, MA, examining how different messages about the consequences of childhood obesity could affect public attitudes about obesity-prevention policy. The researchers found that tapping into core values beyond health—like the need for a strong and ready military—appealed to conservatives, sometimes causing them to revise their views on how the problem should be addressed and which public and private entities should play a role.

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