Category Archives: Clinical Scholars

Aug 28 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Medical marijuana’s unanticipated benefits, infant sleep pods, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

States that have legalized medical marijuana have seen nearly 25 percent fewer deaths from overdoses involving prescription painkillers than states that have not, according to a study led by Marcus Bachhuber, MD. ABC News reports on it, noting that 23 states and the District of Columbia have such laws. Researchers found that while opioid overdose rates continued to climb, the increase was much slower in states with medical marijuana laws, resulting in 25 percent fewer deaths from opioid overdose. “This study raises the possibility that there is an unintended public health benefit of medical marijuana laws, but we still need to collect more information to confirm or refute what we’ve found,” says Bachhuber, an RWJF/Veterans Administration Clinical Scholar at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Outlets covering Bachhuber’s study include CNN, Washington Post, Business Insider, Health Day and Vox.

An infant “sleep pod” designed by Jennifer Doering, PhD, RN, is one of 11 projects funded through new grants from the University of Wisconsin Extension and the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports. The $25,000 Ideadvance grants are intended to move good ideas more quickly to the marketplace. Doering’s I-SleepPod, developed as a result of her work in the RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars program, would allow an infant to sleep next to an adult while remaining safe, thanks in part to an alarm that wakes the adult in the event of an unsafe sleeping position. “We designed the sleep pod to minimize hazards because, if we don’t move in that direction of reducing sleep-related infant deaths, then [society] is essentially saying it’s acceptable to have 600 babies die every year that way,” Doering said.

Nutrition rating systems in supermarkets may encourage shoppers to purchase less junk food, according to a study led by John Cawley, PhD, an RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumnus and Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient. The study coupled sales data from Hannaford Supermarkets in the northeastern United States from January 2005 to December 2007 with the Guiding Stars nutritional rating system. The ratings system assigns zero to three stars to food items, based on their nutritional value. Researchers found that sales of less healthy foods—such as highly processed snack foods—fell by 8.31 percent when branded with a low nutrition rating, while healthy food purchases rose by 1.39 percent, Medical Xpress reports.

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Aug 5 2014
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2015 Cohort of RWJF Clinical Scholars Announced

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Clinical Scholars program has announced the 31 physician leaders selected as the program’s final cohort. The new Clinical Scholars are physicians who were selected competitively from medical and surgical residencies across the United States. The 2015 cohort includes physicians specializing in primary care, emergency care, pediatrics, surgery, and psychiatry.

This is the program’s largest cohort in more than five years. Clinical Scholars spend two years examining the delivery, impact, and organization of health care.

RWJF will fully fund 10 of the 31 scholars. Through a partnership of more than 30 years, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) will jointly support 13 scholars through VA Medical Centers affiliated with the participating universities. Those universities will fund six scholars, and for the first time, two scholars at UCLA will receive funding support from the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health.

Read more about the 2015 Clinical Scholars and the funders that are supporting them.

For more information about the program, visit http://rwjcsp.unc.edu/.

Aug 1 2014
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The Imperative to Engage Surgical Residents in Quality Improvement

Charles D. Scales Jr., MD, MSHS, an alumnus of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/VA Clinical Scholars program (UCLA 2011-2013), is a health services researcher at the Duke Clinical Research Institute and assistant professor in the division of urologic surgery at Duke University School of Medicine.  He is also assistant program director for quality improvement and patient safety for the urology residency training program at Duke University Hospital.  

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Young doctors training to become surgeons, also called surgical residents, are increasingly caring for patients in an environment that links quality, safety, and value to patient outcomes. Over a decade ago, the Institute of Medicine highlighted the need for improving care delivery in the landmark report, Crossing the Quality Chasm, suggesting that high-quality care should be safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient (e.g., high value), and equitable. Just this week, the Institute of Medicine followed with a clarion call for training new physicians to participate in and lead efforts to continually improve both care delivery and the health of the population, while simultaneously lowering costs of care.

To support this imperative, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, which accredits all residency training programs in the United States, mandates that all doctors-in-training receive education in quality improvement. Despite this directive, a number of substantial barriers challenge delivery of educational programs around quality improvement.  Health care is increasing complex, driving residents to focus on learning the medical knowledge and surgical skills for their field.  Patient care demands time and attention, which can limit opportunities to learn about quality improvement within the context of 80-hour duty limits. This barrier particularly challenges surgeons-in-training, who often spend 12 or more hours daily learning surgical skills in the operating room, leaving little time for a traditional lecture-format session about quality improvement. Finally, many surgical training programs lack faculty with expertise in the skills required to systematically improve the quality, safety, and value of patient care, since these skills were simply not taught to prior generations of surgeons.

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Jul 31 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Cesarean sections, hospital readmissions, nurse practitioners, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

RWJF Clinical Scholar Chileshe Nkonde-Price, MD, shared her experiences with the medical system  during the last week of her recent pregnancy in a video featured on Nasdaq.com. Despite have given birth via Cesarean section earlier, Nkonde-Price wished to deliver vaginally with this pregnancy if she could do so safely. C-section has become the nation’s most common major surgery, the piece says. It examines some of the factors behind the sharp increase in the number of women delivering via C-section in the United States.

In a Health Affairs Blog, José Pagán, PhD, analyzes Medicare’s Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP), which penalizes hospitals with excessive 30-day readmissions for conditions such as pneumonia and heart failure. While Pagán says that not all readmissions can be avoided, hospitals can improve their performance through effective discharge planning and care coordination. With more incentive programs on the horizon, Pagán suggests that health care organizations “seek and monitor collaborative partnerships and, more importantly, strategically invest in sustaining these partnerships” so they can survive and thrive. He is an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus and recipient of an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research.

A study led by RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholar Lusine Poghosyan, PhD, RN, looks at how Nurse Practitioners (NPs) rate their work environments. It finds that those working in Massachusetts fared better that those working in New York on every topic in the survey: support and resources, relations with physicians, relations with administration, visibility and comprehension of their role, and independence of practice. The survey also found that NPs working in community health clinics and physicians’ offices rated their work experiences better than NPs working in hospital-affiliated clinics. Poghosyan told Science Codex the findings suggest “the practice environment for NPs in New York can improve once the state’s NP Modernization Act,” which will expand NPs’ scope of practice, takes effect.

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Jul 30 2014
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MBA Degrees Give Physicians a Career Boost

Physicians who have both doctor of medicine (MD) and master of business administration (MBA) degrees reported that their dual training had a positive professional impact, according to a study published online by Academic Medicine. The study, one of the first to assess MD/MBA graduates’ perceptions of how their training has affected their careers, focused on physician graduates from the MBA program in health care management at the University of Pennsylvania.

file Mitesh S. Patel

The MD was more often cited as conveying professional credibility, while 40 to 50 percent of respondents said the MBA conveyed leadership, management, and business skills. Respondents also cited multidisciplinary experience and improved communication between the medical and business worlds as benefits of the two degrees.

“Our findings may have significant implications for current and future physician-managers as the landscape of health care continues to change,” lead author Mitesh S. Patel, MD, MBA, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Clinical Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania, said in a news release. “A study published in 2009 found that among 6,500 hospitals in the United States, only 235 were run by physicians. Moving forward, changing dynamics triggered by national health care reform will likely require leaders to have a better balance between clinical care and business savvy. Graduates with MD and MBA training could potentially fill this growing need within the sector.”

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Jul 18 2014
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Building a Culture of Health at AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting

RWJF Leadership Reception at the AcademyHealth RWJF Leadership Reception at the AcademyHealth annual meeting in San Diego in June 2014

At this year’s AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting, held in San Diego, California June 8–10, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) hosted “Building a Culture of Health: An RWJF Leadership Reception.” More than 100 RWJF scholars, fellows, and alumni representing 14 RWJF Human Capital programs joined with colleagues and friends of the Foundation for the gathering at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront. There, health providers, clinicians, researchers, and graduate students made and renewed the important professional connections that RWJF facilitates.

Among those attending the reception were RWJF Health & Society Scholars alumnus and RWJF Clinical Scholars Associate Program Director (University of Pennsylvania program site) David Grande, MA, MPA, who presented his paper, “How Do Health Policy Researchers Perceive and Use Social Media to Disseminate Science to Policymakers?,” at the meeting; RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars Lusine Poghosyan, PhD, MPH, RN, and J. Margo Brooks Carthon, PhD, APRN, who chaired and served as a panelist, respectively, at a health care workforce session; and Clinical Scholars Tammy Chang, MD, MPH, MS, and Katherine A. Auger, MD, M.Sc., who were both chosen as recipients of the AcademyHealth Presidential Scholarship for New Health Services Researchers. This scholarship provides financial support to attend the meeting, and recognizes early-career researchers who demonstrate leadership ability and potential to contribute to the field of health services research.

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Jul 10 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Healthcare.gov, depression and mortality, stress among nurses, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

Young adult users of Healthcare.gov, the health insurance marketplace established under the Affordable Care Act, recommend that the site offer better explanations of terminology, more clarity about the benefits various plans offer, and checkboxes and other features that make it easier to compare plans. Those are among the findings of a study conducted by RWJF Clinical Scholar Charlene Wong, MD, along with alumni David Asch, MD, MBA, and Raina Merchant, MD, that looked at the experiences of young adults who used the website. The scholars write about their findings in the Philadelphia Inquirer. Wong told the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics blog that these users “may not know what insurance terms mean but they have a lot of expertise and insights about maximizing the usability of the digital platforms that have always been such an integral part of their lives.”

Major depression (also known as “clinical depression”) is associated with an elevated risk of death from cardiovascular disease, according to research covered by Kansas City InfoZine. The study, co-authored by Patrick Krueger, PhD, an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus, also found that the relationship between depression and early non-suicide mortality is independent of such factors as smoking, exercise, body mass, education, income, and employment status. The authors say the findings indicate that the relationship between depression and mortality is not due solely to the interplay between depression and health-compromising risk factors.

Expanding scope of practice for advanced practice nurses and implementing better management practices could alleviate some stress factors for nurses and improve patient care, Matthew McHugh, PhD, JD, MPH, FAAN, tells Healthline News. For example, in some medical facilities, nurses are empowered to decide if a patient’s urinary catheter should be removed without consulting a doctor, thus preventing delays in care. “Lots of things that don’t require policy change” can have an important impact on patient outcomes and nurses’ job satisfaction, said McHugh, an RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars alumnus.

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Jul 8 2014
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Transforming Communities to Reduce Stress and Improve Health

Brita Roy, MD, MPH, MS, is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)/U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Clinical Scholar, and Carley Riley, MD, MPP, is an RWJF Clinical Scholar. 

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You awake to the sound of your alarm, not feeling as rested as you’d hoped. Hurriedly bathing and dressing, you then grab a breakfast bar and stumble over your long-neglected bicycle to climb into your car, joining other anonymous drivers enduring their morning commutes.

file Brita Roy, MD, MPH, MS

Unfortunately, these sorts of mornings, all too common to Americans, create negative stress and worsen health. Under time constraints and other pressures, stressed individuals engage in less healthy behaviors: eating more unhealthy foods, exercising less, smoking more, and sleeping less than their less stressed counterparts. And the persistent assault of low-grade stressors, such as air and noise pollution, constant rush, lack of nature, and social isolation repeatedly trigger our bodies’ stress responses, promote persistent low-level inflammation, and subsequently undermine our cardiovascular and overall health.

file Carley Riley, MD, MPP

Beyond these familiar stressors, emerging research is showing how the nature of our communities and our relationships within them—our social environment—also influence our health. We are learning that living in neighborhoods in which residents do not know or trust each other increases negative stress levels. And how living in communities in which residents do not have confidence in their government or do not believe they can affect change to better their lives also creates stress.

We have greater understanding of how people living in neighborhoods with high crime and violence rates experience more chronic stress. And we are finding that living and working in environments in which we feel powerless augments the negative health effects of stress. 

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Jul 3 2014
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Reengineering Medical Product Innovation

Arthur Kellermann, MD, MPH, an alumnus of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Clinical Scholars and Health Policy Fellows programs, is professor and dean of the F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD. He is co-author of the new RAND report, “Redirecting Innovation in U.S. Health Care: Options to Decrease Spending and Increase Value.” Here, he shares recommendations for a brave new world of medical technology.

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Americans take justifiable pride in our capacity for innovation. From putting the first men on the moon to developing the Internet, we lead the world in developing innovative technologies. Health care is no exception. The United States holds more Nobel prizes in medicine than any other nation.

Novel drugs, biologics, diagnostics, and medical devices have transformed American health care, but not always for the better.

Some innovations have made a big difference. Combination antiretroviral therapy changed HIV infection from a death sentence to a treatable, chronic disease. Before an effective vaccine was developed, Hemophilus Influenze type b, a bacterial disease, was a major cause of death and mental disability in young children. Today, it is virtually eradicated here and in Western Europe.

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Jun 27 2014
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A Commitment to Making the Emerging Field of Pediatric Palliative Care the Very Best It Can Be

Chris Feudtner, MD, PhD, MPH, is a pediatrician, epidemiologist, historian, and ethicist at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and professor of pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania. He is an alumnus of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars program.

Chris Feudtner

Living in a situation beyond almost-unbearable imagination: This is the reality that children with life-threatening conditions and their parents confront, and that the rapidly emerging field of pediatric palliative care seeks to address with compassionate and specialized medical and psychosocial expertise.1

A bit of background:  just over half of the 45,000 children who die in the United States each year are infants, who often die within hours of their birth. Others die after traumatic injuries, usually quite suddenly. And a substantial proportion of the children die after a prolonged illness trajectory, due to a wide range of chronic conditions, ranging from cancer to congenital anomalies to neurodegenerative diseases. Most of these children spend days or weeks in hospitals, with frequent hospitalizations, and with the likelihood of hospitalization going up as the condition worsens.

To meet the needs of these patients and their families, many children’s hospitals in the United States have created dedicated pediatric palliative care teams. These interdisciplinary teams—composed of physicians, nurses, social workers, child life and art therapists, chaplains, and other specialists—pursue three core tasks on behalf of these patients. First, they manage pain and other symptoms, using both pharmacologic and complementary methods. Second, they support patients and parents in the often overwhelming process of receiving medical information and making treatment decisions. Third, they help coordinate care both across specialty disciplines within the health system, and across different sites of care, from the hospital setting to home or other residential sites, often in partnership with hospice or home nursing. All of this is done in coordination with the patient’s primary medical or surgical team2—palliative care adds and never subtracts.

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