Category Archives: Campaign for Action

Aug 26 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The August 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the August issue.

More Nursing Schools Preparing Students to Provide Team-Based Care
Several of the nation’s top nursing schools now require students to participate in at least one interprofessional education course or activity, reports the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action. Experts have called for interprofessional education for decades, but more health professions schools are responding now because requirements are being written into health professions accreditation standards, says Barbara Brandt, PhD, head of the National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education, a public-private partnership supported by RWJF, the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, and other organizations.

Physical Work Environment in Hospitals Affects Nurses’ Job Satisfaction, With Implications for Patient Outcomes, Health Care Costs
A study conducted by RWJF’s RN Work Project finds that a physical work environment that facilitates registered nurses’ efficiency, teamwork and interprofessional communication relates to higher job satisfaction. The study revealed that physical environment affected whether nurses could complete tasks without interruptions, communicate easily with other nurses and physicians, and/or do their jobs efficiently.

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Aug 25 2014
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RWJF Milestones, August 2014

The following are among the many honors received recently by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, grantees and alumni:

James S. Jackson, PhD, a 2009 recipient of an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research, has been appointed by President Obama to serve on the National Science Foundation’s National Science Board. Jackson is a professor at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, and director of its Institute for Social Research.

Geraldine “Polly” Bednash, PhD, RN, FAAN, will receive the National League for Nursing’s (NLN) highest honor, the President’s Award, at the 2014 NLN Education Summit in mid-September. Bednash is the recently retired chief executive officer of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and director of New Careers in Nursing, a joint initiative of RWJF and AACN focused on increasing diversity in the nursing workforce.

Sally Cohen, PhD, RN, FAAN, has been selected as the 2014-2015 Distinguished Nurse Scholar-in-Residence at the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. The program provides a yearlong leadership opportunity to participate in shaping health policy. Cohen was also named editor-in-chief of the journal, Policy, Politics & Nursing Practice.  She is director of the Nursing and Health Policy Collaborative at the University of New Mexico.

Lainie Ross, MD, PhD, a 2013 recipient of an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research, has been named a 2014 Guggenheim Fellow. Ross will use her fellowship year to research the relationship between ethics and genetics for a book, currently titled, From Peapods to Whole Genomes: Incidental Findings and Unintended Consequences in a Post-Mendelian World. The fellowship is awarded by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation to recipients with “demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts.”

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Aug 7 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: The ACA and mental health treatment, HIV training for nurses, the rise of superbugs, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

An Affordable Care Act (ACA) provision that allows parents to keep adult children on their health insurance plans under they reach age 26 has resulted in millions more young people with mental-health and substance-abuse problems getting treatment, according to a study led by Brendan Saloner, PhD. Time reports that over two years, young adults ages 18 to 25 who had screened positive for mental health or substance abuse disorders increased their use of mental-health treatment by 5.3 percent compared to a similar group who were not eligible for their parents’ coverage. Vox and HealthDay were among the outlets to report on the study. Saloner is an RWJF Health & Society Scholar.

Infection Control Today quotes Jason Farley, PhD, MPH, CRNP, on the growing need to train nurses to provide HIV care. An RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholar, Farley developed new HIV curriculum for the John Hopkins School of Nursing, where he is an associate professor. “For many years these specialty training programs in HIV have been available for physicians,” he says. “This is the first time we’re offering them to non-physician providers. It’s quite an important development. When you look at data comparing patient outcomes with physician care and with nurse practitioner care in HIV, whether in the United States or in sub-Saharan Africa, those outcomes are the same.”

Magda Cerdá, PhD, MPH, an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumna, explores the stressors that lead to high numbers of returning National Guard soldiers abusing alcohol, reports Science Codex. Cerda is the lead investigator of the study, which examined 1,095 Ohio National Guard soldiers who served primarily in Iraq or Afghanistan in 2008 and 2009, and found that having just one civilian stressor such as job loss, or legal or financial problems, raised the odds of alcohol use disorders. Medical Daily and Medical Xpress also cover Cerda’s work.

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Aug 6 2014
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In the Media: Nursing Champion Calls on Hollywood to Portray Realities of Nursing

This is part of the August 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

The TV is a funhouse mirror—at least when it comes to its portrayals of nurses.

That’s the view of Leah Binder, MA, MGA, president and CEO of the Leapfrog Group, a national organization that promotes quality and safety in hospitals, and a member of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action’s Champion Nursing Coalition.

In a recent essay in the Wall Street Journal’s The Experts blog, Binder says television medical shows badly distort everyday life in hospitals and health care facilities. “Tune to your favorite hospital drama and count how many characters are nurses and how many are doctors,” she writes. “More likely than not, you will find about 10 doctors for every one nurse. The reality is roughly the opposite: There are about 10 times more nurses than physicians in the hospital down the street from you. Most of what hospitals do is deliver expert nursing care.”

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Jul 14 2014
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Breakthrough Leaders in Nursing

The Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action has announced a new program to honor nurse leaders who are making a difference in their communities and to develop their leadership skills. The Campaign will be accepting nominations for its Breakthrough Leaders in Nursing award through August 15th.

Nominees must be licensed registered nurses engaged in a state Action Coalition of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action. Nominations can come from any member of a state Action Coalition, the Champion Nursing Coalition, or the Champion Nursing Council.

The ten nurses selected for this honor will receive national recognition and a Leadership Development Program scholarship from the Center for Creative Leadership, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).  

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Jun 30 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The June 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends related to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the June 2014 issue.

Campaign for Action Is Chalking Up Successes that Will Improve Patient Care
Three years after it launched, the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action is making steady progress on nurse education, practice, interprofessional collaboration, data collection, and diversity, according to a series of indicators released last month. Led by RWJF and AARP, the Campaign has created Action Coalitions in all 50 states and the District of Columbia that are working to implement recommendations from the Institute of Medicine. “Because of the Campaign, there’s more awareness about the importance of preparing the nursing workforce to address our nation’s most pressing health care challenges: access, quality, and cost,” says RWJF Senior Program Officer Nancy Fishman, MPH.

Pioneering Nurse Scientist Addresses Asthma-Related Disparities
Kamal Eldeirawi
, PhD, RN, a pioneering scientist with expertise in immigrant health, was born in the Gaza Strip in Palestine, where he saw the profound impact of poverty and disadvantage on health in his own community. A career in nursing, the RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholar believed, would allow him to make a difference at both the individual and population-wide levels. Today, Eldeirawi, is researching risk factors that contribute to asthma in Mexican American children living in the United States, and the effects of immigration and acculturation on children’s health.

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May 28 2014
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My Greatest Reward: Watching High School Seniors Grow into University-Level Nursing Students

Kelly Andrews Cleaton, MAEd, is a Student Success Advocate (SSA) in eastern North Carolina for Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses (RIBN), which aims to improve the health and health outcomes of North Carolinians by increasing the educational preparation and diversity of the nursing workforce. RIBN is supported by Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future, a partnership of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to support the capacity, involvement, and leadership of local foundations to advance the nursing profession in their own communities, and by Academic Progression in Nursing (APIN), an RWJF-supported initiative to advance state and regional strategies to create a more highly educated nursing workforce.

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I began my career as a first grade teacher because I love working with students and watching them grow over time. The next stop in my career was at East Carolina University (ECU), where I worked with students who wanted to become teachers. During my work there, I decided that I really enjoyed watching older students develop into their professions.

Quite by accident one day, I saw an online advertisement for a position as an SSA for RIBN, and it seemed like the perfect fit for me. I absolutely love traveling to high schools in eastern North Carolina and being able to talk to students about the RIBN program. The excited look in their eyes when I tell them there is an affordable way to get their bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) degree is priceless. I enjoy working with five community colleges and putting everything together like the pieces of a puzzle.

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May 16 2014
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Stay Up to Date with RWJF!

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May 14 2014
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Mentors Can Help Young Nurses Grow into Leaders

National Nurses Week just ended, but several nurses are continuing the conversation, blogging about the reasons they aspire to leadership. Chelsea Savage, RN, MSHA, CPHRM, is a professional liability investigator at Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center in Richmond, Va., and was recognized in 2011 as a young nursing leader by the Virginia Action Coalition.

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Like many nursing advocates, I internalized my interest in social justice through my personal history. I was raised by a single mother on welfare, and my childhood had the added stress of an educational disadvantage. My mother, motivated by strong religiosity and the isolation from society characteristic of this construct, took me out of school in sixth grade and forced me into a passive homeschool process. I was given curricula, but not a teacher, so I taught myself and passed the General Educational Development test, better known as the GED, at 15.

I was introduced to nursing while volunteering at a hospital for two–and-half years and pursued an associate’s degree in nursing (ADN) for a year at age 16. Later, though, I dropped out of the ADN program. At 26, then a step-mom of three and a biological mom of one, I went back and earned my nursing degree.

Having said goodbye to my cultish upbringing, I was now driven by an insatiable curiosity and felt limitless educational potential. I went on to pursue a bachelor’s degree in philosophy, a graduate degree in health administration, and a fellowship in health law. I am now earning my doctorate in nursing practice (DNP) and am seen by some as a nursing leader.

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May 9 2014
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Bringing the Caring Touch to Leadership Tables

Susan B. Hassmiller, PhD, RN, FAAN, is senior adviser for nursing at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and director of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action.

Sue Hassmiller

I flew to Florida years ago to be with my father at the end of his life. He lay in a hospital bed, at times conscious of the family members gathered at his side and other times unaware of his loved ones surrounding him. I watched a nurse I didn’t know lean over and kiss his forehead.

At another hospital bed years later, I watched a nurse comfort my daughter as she labored to bring my first granddaughter into the world. “You’ll be okay,” she whispered to my daughter, giving her a hug.

The end of life and the beginning of life, marked by a compassionate nurse keeping vigil and offering comfort.  In the midst of machines, a nurse provides a human touch and caring to patients and their family members.

National Nurses Week HC Blog Logo

The essence of caring is what first attracted me to the nursing profession. Now, more than 35 years later, the essence of caring still propels me in my work as the director of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, a joint initiative of RWJF and AARP to transform health through nursing. One of the Campaign’s major focus areas is promoting nursing leadership. 

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