Category Archives: Sharing Nursing's Knowledge

Jan 21 2015
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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, January 2015

This is part of the January 2015 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

“I knew that if something were to go wrong, the nurse was just a phone call away. It made me feel so empowered to take care of my child myself.”
--Camille Wallace, LPN, How Nurses Can Help Low-Income Mothers and Kids, The Atlantic.com, January 14, 2015

“There’s plenty of evidence that there’s a shortage of nursing care, and it’s not solved by anything to do with the hospital supply. All the shortage of care at the bedside has to do with [is] how much hospitals want to pay nurses, and whether they want to use their resources on something else.”
--Linda Aiken, PhD, RN, FAAN, director, Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, More Nurses are Better for Patients. Why is it so Hard to Get Hospitals to Hire Them?” The Washington Post, January 13, 2015

“Drivers of the shortage include an aging nursing workforce, increased number of people receiving health care via the Affordable Care Act along with increased number of people living with complex, chronic disease that requires care. Nursing provides a diverse array of opportunities from health care and bedside nursing to advanced practice nursing to positions for nurses in the business world.”
--Laura Rooney, DNP, APRN, director, UT Health Services, University of Texas Health Science Center, Outlook for Nursing Jobs Continues to Look Positive, Houston Chronicle, January 9, 2015

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Jan 20 2015
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Recent Research About Nursing, January 2015

This is part of the January 2015 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Study: Night Shift Work Hazardous to Your Health?

A new study finds that female nurses working rotating night shifts for five or more years have a higher risk of death from cardiovascular disease and lung cancer than those who do not work such hours.

A team of researchers led by Eva Schernhammer, MD, DrPH, began with longitudinal data from the 1988 Nurses’ Health Study, a long-running data-collection project focused on women’s health. The 1988 iteration of the survey asked if respondents worked rotating night shifts at least three nights a month, in addition to day or evening shifts in that same month—and if so, for how many years they had been doing so. Some 75,000 respondents were included in follow-up research over the next 22 years, tracking the nurses’ personal health; researchers also examined death records, as needed.

Researchers found that women who’d worked three or more rotating night shifts a month for five years or more had higher all-cause mortality rates, as well as higher rates of death from cardiovascular disease. Women who worked such shifts for 15 or more years had elevated death rates from lung cancer.

In a news release, Schernhammer observes, “These results add to prior evidence of a potentially detrimental relation of rotating night shift work and health and longevity ... To derive practical implications for shift workers and their health, the role of duration and intensity of rotating night shift work and the interplay of shift schedules with individual traits ... warrant further exploration."

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Jan 15 2015
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In the Media: Cartoon Nurse Character Counters Negative Portrayals of Nursing

This is part of the January 2015 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

A new kids’ movie is putting a positive spin on nursing—a profession that is routinely overlooked, and sometimes denigrated, in Hollywood.

Baymax, the lead character in Big Hero 6, Disney’s latest animated feature film, doesn’t look like your typical nurse in scrubs: The character is a male, futuristic balloon robot who brings to mind the Pillsbury doughboy, but on massive doses of steroids.

Baymax, nonetheless, carries out his role as a nurse and caregiver throughout the film and performs routine nursing care such as scanning for and diagnosing health conditions and prescribing treatments for various ailments. He even uses the pain scale, a classic nursing assessment tool, Harry Summers, co-author of Saving Lives: Why the Media’s Portrayal of Nurses Puts Us All at Risk, points out in a review.

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Dec 23 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The December 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research and trends relating to academic progression, leadership and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the December issue.

A Goal and a Challenge: Putting 10,000 Nurses on Governing Boards by 2020
As nurse leaders and champions from around the country gathered in Phoenix last month for the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action 2014 Summit, a powerful coalition of national nursing organizations launched the Nurses on Boards Coalition, an unprecedented effort to increase the presence of nurses on corporate and non-profit health-related boards of directors. The Coalition will implement a national strategy aimed at bringing the perspectives of nurses to governing boards and to national and state commissions that are working to improve health.

Older Nurses Push Retirement Envelope
A growing number of nurses are continuing to practice in their late 60s and beyond—a phenomenon that has significant implications for the nursing workforce and the health care system. While some nurses have always worked past the traditional age of retirement, the number of older nurses in clinical practice is growing, according to a recent study by Peter Buerhaus, PhD, RN, a professor of nursing at Vanderbilt University and director of the university’s Center for Interdisciplinary Health Workforce Studies.

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Dec 16 2014
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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, December 2014

This is part of the December 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

“This holiday season, my one wish is that every nurse knows their worth and that every patient knows theirs.”
--Shelly Lopez Gray, RN, blogger, Adventures of Labor Nurse: The Highs and Lows of Labor and Delivery, A Nurse’s Wish in Labor and Delivery, Huffington Post Parents, Dec. 8, 2014

“Nurses have new and expanding roles. They are case managers, helping patients navigate the maze of health care choices and develop plans of care. They are patient educators who focus on preventative care in a multitude of settings outside hospitals. And they are leaders, always identifying ways for their practice to improve. Because nurses have the most direct patient care, they have much influence on serious treatment decisions. It is a very high stakes job. Everyone wants the best nurse for the job, and that equates to the best educated nurse.”
--Judy Evans, MS, RN, associate professor of nursing, Colorado Mountain College, Patients Benefit When Nurses Have Advanced Education, The Glenwood Springs Post Independent, Dec. 7, 2014

“Nurses are not just doers. Our work is supported by evidence and guided by theory. We integrate evidence and theory with our knowledge of patients and make important decisions with and for patients and families at the point of care. Research and practice are not separate but integrated. Nursing is a practice discipline with our own theories and research base that we both generate, use, and disseminate to others.”
--Antonia Villarruel, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor and Margaret Bond Simon Dean of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Q&A with Antonia Villarruel, Penn Current, Nov. 20, 2014

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Dec 11 2014
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Recent Research About Nursing, December 2014

This is part of the December 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Study: ‘Alarm Fatigue’ Poses Danger

After a while, alarms stop being so alarming. That’s the warning growing out of a study of the sheer volume of physiological alarms generated by bedside monitoring systems in hospitals. The barrage of beeps can become so overwhelming that it creates “alarm fatigue,” which in turn can lead nurses and other clinicians to discount the urgency of alarms or to ignore them altogether.

In the study, led by University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing Professor Barbara Drew, PhD, MS, researchers tracked the quantity and accuracy of alarms generated in five intensive care units at the UCSF Medical Center over a 31-day period. They found a high rate of false positives—alarms generated when patients were not in need of treatment beyond what they were already receiving. For example, during that time, researchers counted 12, 671 alarms for arrhythmia, 89 percent of which were false positives. Most of those were the result of problems with the alarm system’s algorithms, incorrect settings, technical malfunctions, or brief heart rate spikes that did not require further attention.

In all, during the 31-day period, the systems generated an average of 187 alarms per patient bed per day, adding up to more than 380,000 audible alarms over the course of the month, across the five ICUs.

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Dec 11 2014
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In the Media: New Exhibits Shine Light on the History of Nursing

This is part of the December 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

On television and in other media, nurses are often portrayed as gendered stereotypes: the angel, the handmaiden, the battle-axe, or the sex-object.

Turns out, these portrayals aren’t new. That is evident in a new postcard exhibit at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Md., that illustrates cultural perceptions of nursing over the last century.

The exhibit, entitled Pictures of Nursing, hails from a collection of more than 2,500 postcards that were donated by Michael Zwerdling, RN. The collection includes postcards that date to the late 1800s, and features images of nurses portrayed as everything from Greek goddesses to Amazon princesses to the Virgin Mary. It also includes rare images of male nurses.

Some of the exhibit’s more contemporary postcards depict nurses in modern uniforms and as skilled members of health care teams—images that counteract sexist and gendered notions of nursing that come through in other postcards.

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Nov 7 2014
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Recent Research About Nursing, November 2014

This is part of the November 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

DNP Programs Increasing

New research by the RAND Corporation, conducted for the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), finds that the percentage and number of nursing schools offering doctorates in nursing practice (DNPs) has increased dramatically in recent years, but that some schools still face barriers to adopting programs that confer the degree.

Ten years ago, AACN member schools endorsed a call for moving the level of preparation necessary for advanced nursing practice from the masters to doctoral level, establishing a target of 2015. More recently, the Institute of Medicine’s landmark report on the future of nursing called for doubling the number of doctorally prepared nurses in order to help meet the demands of an ever more complex health care system.

According to RAND’s data, nursing schools are following through. Since 2006, the number of schools offering DNP degrees has grown by more than 1,000 percent, from 20 schools in 2006 to 251 in 2013.

The report finds that approximately 30 percent of nursing schools with Advanced Practice Registered Nursing (APRN) programs now offer degree paths in which baccalaureate-prepared nurses move directly to DNP programs, and that such BSN-DNP programs will likely be in another fifth of nursing schools with APRN programs in a few years.

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Nov 6 2014
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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, November 2014

This is part of the November 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

“As a nurse, I understand the risk that I take every day to go to work, and he’s no different than any other patient that I’ve provided care for. So I wasn’t going to say, ‘No, I’m not going to provide care for him. I didn’t allow fear to paralyze me. I got myself together. I’d done what I needed to get myself prepared mentally, emotionally, physically, and went in there.”
--Sidia Rose, a nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, Treating Ebola: Inside the First U.S. Diagnosis, 60 Minutes, CBS News, Oct. 26, 2014

“...I grabbed a tissue and I wiped his eyes and I said, ‘You’re going to be okay. You just get the rest that you need. Let us do the rest for you.’ And it wasn’t 15 minutes later I couldn’t find a pulse. And I lost him. And it was the worst day of my life. This man that we cared for, that fought just as hard with us, lost his fight. And his family couldn’t be there. And we were the last three people to see him alive. And I was the last to leave the room. And I held him in my arms. He was alone.”
--John Mulligan, a nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, Treating Ebola: Inside the First U.S. Diagnosis, 60 Minutes, CBS News, Oct. 26, 2014

“Someone asked a nurse, what do you make? I make sure your seriously ill father is cared for. I make sure that when you’re incontinent you’re cared for. It’s this everyday, profound yet intimate work that people do. People don’t understand it. It requires incredible cognitive and emotional intellect to do it. You are with someone at the most difficult and challenging and joyous moments of their lives.”
--Diana Mason, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor, Hunter-Bellevue School of Nursing and president, American Academy of Nursing, Nurses Want to Know How Safe is Safe Enough With Ebola, NPR.org, Oct. 14, 2014

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Oct 21 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The October 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research and trends relating to academic progression, leadership and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the October issue.

Campaign Helps Advance Institute of Medicine's Call for More Nurse Leaders
On the fourth anniversary of the release of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) landmark report on the future of the nursing profession, more nurse leaders are stepping into positions of power and influence—and efforts to prepare even more nurses for leadership are gaining ground. Today, the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action is putting new emphasis on the report’s leadership recommendation, and nurses and their employers in government and other sectors are responding. The Campaign is a joint initiative of RWJF and AARP.

Nursing Improvements Could Boost Outcomes for 7 Out of 10 Critically Ill Black Babies
A new study funded by RWJF’s Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative and the National Institute of Nursing Research provides insight into the issue of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, who are disproportionately black. Researchers found that nurse understaffing and practice environments were worse at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, contributing to adverse outcomes for VLBW infants born in those facilities.

California has “Well-Educated” Nurse Force, Study Finds
While California has a “well-educated” nurse force, a survey published by the state’s Board of Registered Nursing shows that there is a long way to go toward meeting the goal set forth by the Institute of Medicine’s landmark report on the future of nursing that 80 percent of nurses hold bachelor’s degrees or higher by 2020. About 60 percent of the state’s registered nurses have earned a bachelor’s or graduate degree in nursing or another field, the survey found. Nearly 40 percent of respondents—and nearly 80 percent of those under 35—said they are considering or seriously considering additional education.

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