Category Archives: Sharing Nursing's Knowledge

Sep 30 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The September 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research and trends relating to academic progression, leadership and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the September issue.

Advocates Work to Recruit Latinos to Nursing
Latinos comprised only 3 percent of the nation’s nursing workforce in 2013, according to a survey by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing and the National Forum of State Workforce Centers, and 17 percent of the nation’s population, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. More Latino nurses can help narrow health disparities, experts say. “Having a culturally competent nurse really makes a difference in terms of compliance and patient outcomes,” said Elias Provencio-Vasquez, PhD, RN, FAAN, FAANP, an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program alumnus. “Patients really respond when they have a provider who understands their culture.”

New Careers in Nursing Program Helps Minnesota College Expand and Diversify While Improving Care in Rural Communities
Since its 2008 launch, the RWJF New Careers in Nursing program (NCIN) has kept a tight focus on attracting a diverse group of “second-career” students to nursing. Along the way, NCIN has had a profound effect on many of the institutions themselves. One such school, the College of St. Scholastica (CSS), saw its overall program change and grow substantially, in great measure because of its participation. NCIN has supported scholarships to 40 CSS accelerated-degree nursing students over the last seven years.

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Sep 16 2014
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Sep 11 2014
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Recent Research About Nursing, September 2014

This is part of the September 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Lower Hospitalization Rates Linked to Broader NP Scope of Practice

New research correlating state-by-state hospitalization rates with state policies on nurse practitioner (NP) scope of practice offers a revealing conclusion: Medicare and Medicaid patients are less likely to require hospitalization in states that allow NPs a broader scope of practice.

A team of researchers from the University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing examined hospitalization data from a range of sources that sorted data by state, and then compared it with American Association of Nurse Practitioners data on state laws and regulations governing NP scope of practice. They found “a significant relationship between full practice of NPs and decreased hospitalization rates of Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries in the United States and improved health outcomes of states.”

The researchers caution that the data do not prove a causal relationship between scope of practice and hospitalization rates, but write, “Our findings support the increasing call of facilitating Advanced Practice Registered Nurses [APRNs] to fulfill their full scope of practice in providing access and care to patients without direct or indirect supervision from physicians. The outcomes support the Institute of Medicine recommendation that APRNs practice to their full scope of practice including functioning as primary care providers.”

The study was published online by Nursing Outlook on August 4, 2014.

Read an abstract of the study or a news article on it in McKnight’s.

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Sep 9 2014
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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, September 2014

This is part of the September 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

“Changing cultural norms within the nursing profession will require efforts from all parties: from nursing graduates, in treating their colleagues with respect and raising awareness by reporting incidents; from nursing leaders, in leading by example to foster supportive behaviors and promote a healthy work environment; from health care institutions, in setting zero tolerance disciplinary policies and empowering staff to report on issues without fear of retaliation; and from academic institutions, in preparing students with conflict management skills to address situations as they arise.”
--Susan Sanders, DNP, RN, NEA-BC, vice president, Kaplan Nursing, Bullying a Rising Concern for New Nurses, U.S. News & World Report, September 3, 2014

“It is time to stop wringing our hands that there are inadequate MDs wanting to provide primary care service. There is a very synergistic way that medicine and advanced practice nursing can work together, capitalize on the strengths that each discipline brings to the table, and maximize the patient experience and the outcomes. This is a new model.”
--Rosemary Dale, EdD, professor of nursing, University of Vermont, New Health Care Model Tested in BurlingtonBurlington Free Press, August 30, 2014

“The numbers speak for themselves. As the demographics change and more ethnically and racially diverse populations grow, there will definitely continue to be a need for health care providers who mirror these patients.”
--Eva Gomez, MSN, RN-BC, CPN, staff development specialist, Children’s Hospital in Boston, Push to Recruit Black, Latino Nurses, Washington Informer, August 27, 2014

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Sep 9 2014
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In the Media: TV Show Zooms in on Birthplace of Midwifery in America

This is part of the September 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Nurse-midwifery took a turn in the media spotlight last month during a television talk show in Kentucky, the “birthplace” of midwifery and family nursing practice in America.

In a half-hour segment on Kentucky Educational Television, TV host Renee Shaw interviewed officials from Frontier Nursing University, the longest continuously operating and largest midwifery program in the country. The university will mark its 75th anniversary in October.

Nurse midwives and nurse practitioners “really want to make their community a better place, and they know from working in the system that, as nurses, they can do that,” said Julie Marfell, DNP, APRN, FAANP, dean of nursing at Frontier Nursing University.

Midwifery got its official start in America thanks to Mary Breckenridge, a nurse from a prominent political family who was born in the 1880s. After the deaths of her first husband and both of her children, Breckinridge decided to devote her life to improving health and health care. In 1925, she founded the Frontier Nursing Service in Hyden, Ky., a remote and unserved part of the country, so she could bring British midwifery practices to the United States. The Frontier Nursing Service later added the nation’s first schools of midwifery and family nurse practice.

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Aug 26 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The August 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the August issue.

More Nursing Schools Preparing Students to Provide Team-Based Care
Several of the nation’s top nursing schools now require students to participate in at least one interprofessional education course or activity, reports the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action. Experts have called for interprofessional education for decades, but more health professions schools are responding now because requirements are being written into health professions accreditation standards, says Barbara Brandt, PhD, head of the National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education, a public-private partnership supported by RWJF, the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, and other organizations.

Physical Work Environment in Hospitals Affects Nurses’ Job Satisfaction, With Implications for Patient Outcomes, Health Care Costs
A study conducted by RWJF’s RN Work Project finds that a physical work environment that facilitates registered nurses’ efficiency, teamwork and interprofessional communication relates to higher job satisfaction. The study revealed that physical environment affected whether nurses could complete tasks without interruptions, communicate easily with other nurses and physicians, and/or do their jobs efficiently.

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Aug 11 2014
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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, August 2014

“Wearable tech will provide nurses with virtual personal assistants that remind them of appointments and meetings, log professional conversations, maintain notes and serve up data and information in a matter of seconds. If nurses need to perform a procedure, wearable computers will remind them of specific steps and risks via links to videos or instant messages shared by nursing colleagues. Although wearable tech comes with limitations related to power, privacy, interface and connectivity, nurses will benefit from this game-changing innovation.”
-- Susan Sportsman, RN, PhD, ANEF, FAAN, director, Academic Consulting Group, a service of Elsevier, Nurses Will Reap the Benefits of Wearable Tech, AdvanceWeb.com, August 5, 2014

“Nurses save lives and deal with complications every day. It can be a very intense and stressful work environment, which is why humor and a good mood are integral to the nursing profession. As a nurse, it’s an art to keep your smile, which helps ensure an excellent connection to patients. Designing affordable space that is conducive to the work is a smart way to bring positive mood—like laughter— into the workplace.”
--Rana Zadeh, MArch, PhD, assistant professor, Cornell University’s College of Human Ecology, On the Sunny Side, Nurses Dispense Better Care, Cornell Chronicle, July 31, 2014

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Aug 6 2014
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In the Media: Nursing Champion Calls on Hollywood to Portray Realities of Nursing

This is part of the August 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

The TV is a funhouse mirror—at least when it comes to its portrayals of nurses.

That’s the view of Leah Binder, MA, MGA, president and CEO of the Leapfrog Group, a national organization that promotes quality and safety in hospitals, and a member of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action’s Champion Nursing Coalition.

In a recent essay in the Wall Street Journal’s The Experts blog, Binder says television medical shows badly distort everyday life in hospitals and health care facilities. “Tune to your favorite hospital drama and count how many characters are nurses and how many are doctors,” she writes. “More likely than not, you will find about 10 doctors for every one nurse. The reality is roughly the opposite: There are about 10 times more nurses than physicians in the hospital down the street from you. Most of what hospitals do is deliver expert nursing care.”

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Jul 24 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Stereotype threat, hand hygiene, misbehaving science, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

Anxiety caused by “stereotype threat” could help explain health disparities that persist across race, suggests research co-authored by Cleopatra Abdou, PhD, an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumna. News Medical covers the study, describing it as the first of its kind to empirically test, in the context of health sciences, the impact of the “threat of being judged by or confirming a negative stereotype about a group you belong to.” Abdou’s research offers a possible explanation for ethnic and socioeconomic differences in morbidity and mortality between Black and White women because, as Abdou says, the research goes beyond nature vs. nurture, “bringing situation and identity into the equation.” For example, in the study, Black women with a strong connection to their race had the highest anxiety levels when in waiting rooms filled with posters that displayed negative health-related racial stereotypes dealing with such topics as unplanned pregnancy and AIDS.

Having health insurance improves access to medical care for pregnant, low-income women, and results in long-term health benefits for their babies, according to a study by RWJF Scholar in Health Policy Research Sarah Miller, PhD, and RWJF Health & Society Scholar Laura Wherry, PhD, that was reported by Vox. Miller and Wherry found the expansion of Medicaid in the 1980s made prenatal care much more accessible to low-income women, many of whom would otherwise have been without insurance. The result was improvements in obesity, preventable hospitalizations, and preventable, chronic disease-related hospitalizations among children. 

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Jul 24 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The July 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the July issue.

Nurses Lead Innovations in Geriatrics and Gerontology
As the nation becomes older and more diverse, and more people are living with chronic health problems, nurses are developing innovations in geriatric care. They are finding new ways to improve the quality of care for older adults; increase access to highly skilled health care providers with training in geriatrics; narrow disparities that disproportionately affect older minorities; avoid preventable hospital readmissions; and more. Nurse-led innovations are underway across the nation to improve care for older Americans.

Improving Care for the Growing Number of Americans with Dementia
By 2050, 16 million Americans—more than triple the current number—will have Alzheimer’s disease. RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars are working now to get ahead of the problem. “We’re all well aware of our aging population and how we’re going to see more individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or some other form of dementia,” says alumna Elizabeth Galik, PhD, CRNP, who is researching ways to improve functional and physical activity among older adults with dementia.

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