Category Archives: Sharing Nursing's Knowledge

Jul 24 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Stereotype threat, hand hygiene, misbehaving science, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

Anxiety caused by “stereotype threat” could help explain health disparities that persist across race, suggests research co-authored by Cleopatra Abdou, PhD, an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumna. News Medical covers the study, describing it as the first of its kind to empirically test, in the context of health sciences, the impact of the “threat of being judged by or confirming a negative stereotype about a group you belong to.” Abdou’s research offers a possible explanation for ethnic and socioeconomic differences in morbidity and mortality between Black and White women because, as Abdou says, the research goes beyond nature vs. nurture, “bringing situation and identity into the equation.” For example, in the study, Black women with a strong connection to their race had the highest anxiety levels when in waiting rooms filled with posters that displayed negative health-related racial stereotypes dealing with such topics as unplanned pregnancy and AIDS.

Having health insurance improves access to medical care for pregnant, low-income women, and results in long-term health benefits for their babies, according to a study by RWJF Scholar in Health Policy Research Sarah Miller, PhD, and RWJF Health & Society Scholar Laura Wherry, PhD, that was reported by Vox. Miller and Wherry found the expansion of Medicaid in the 1980s made prenatal care much more accessible to low-income women, many of whom would otherwise have been without insurance. The result was improvements in obesity, preventable hospitalizations, and preventable, chronic disease-related hospitalizations among children. 

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Jul 24 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The July 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the July issue.

Nurses Lead Innovations in Geriatrics and Gerontology
As the nation becomes older and more diverse, and more people are living with chronic health problems, nurses are developing innovations in geriatric care. They are finding new ways to improve the quality of care for older adults; increase access to highly skilled health care providers with training in geriatrics; narrow disparities that disproportionately affect older minorities; avoid preventable hospital readmissions; and more. Nurse-led innovations are underway across the nation to improve care for older Americans.

Improving Care for the Growing Number of Americans with Dementia
By 2050, 16 million Americans—more than triple the current number—will have Alzheimer’s disease. RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars are working now to get ahead of the problem. “We’re all well aware of our aging population and how we’re going to see more individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or some other form of dementia,” says alumna Elizabeth Galik, PhD, CRNP, who is researching ways to improve functional and physical activity among older adults with dementia.

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Jul 11 2014
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Recent Research About Nursing, July 2014

This is part of the July 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Short Rest Between Nurses’ Shifts Linked with Fatigue

New research from Norway suggests that nurses with less than 11 hours between shifts could develop sleep problems and suffer fatigue on the job, with long-term implications for nurses’ health.

Psychologist Elisabeth Flo, PhD, of the University of Bergen in Norway, led a team of researchers that analyzed survey data from more than 1,200 Norwegian nurses, focusing on questions about how much time nurses had between shifts, their level of fatigue at work and elsewhere, and whether they experienced anxiety or depression.

Analyzing the data, they found that nurses, on average, had 33 instances of “quick returns” in the previous year—that is, shifts that began 11 hours or less after another shift ended. Nurses with more quick returns were more likely to have pathological fatigue or suffer from difficulty sleeping and excessive sleepiness while awake—both common problems for night workers.

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Jul 10 2014
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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, July 2014

This is part of the July 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

“We can’t just sit back and wait for things to get created, to be made for a bigger market, to be made just for a patient like that, so we have to make and create what we need ...”
--Roxana Reyna, BSN, RNC-NIC, WCC, skin and wound care prevention specialist, Driscoll Children’s Hospital, MacGyver Nurse and Maker Nurse Program, KRISTV (Corpus Christi, TX), June 30, 2014

“Nurses make up the single largest segment of the health care workforce and spend more time delivering patient care than any other health care profession. Nursing’s unique ability to meet patient needs at the bedside and beyond puts us in a critical position to transform health care.”
--Michelle Taylor-Smith, RN, BSN, MSN, chief nursing officer, Greenville Health System, GHS to Require B.S. Degrees for Nurses, Greenville Online, June 28, 2014

“This country won’t succeed in its implementation of health care reform without more of these types of [nurse-led] clinics in underserved communities.”
--Tine Hansen-Turton, MGA, JD, FAAN, CEO, National Nursing Centers Consortium, At Paul’s Place, Partnership with Nursing School Promotes Good Health, Baltimore Sun, June 22, 2014

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Jul 2 2014
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In the Media: Nurse Fired for Misusing Social Media on TV Series

This is part of the July 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing's Knowledge.

ABC’s NY Med, a documentary series about hospital life, has a lesson for nurses in the digital age: Think before you post.

Katie Duke, RN, an emergency room nurse at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital who is featured in the series, learned that lesson the hard way.

During the show’s season premiere on June 26, Duke was summarily fired after posting a photo of a messy trauma room on a social media website. She was hired soon after at a different hospital, according to an article about the episode on AOL.com.

“I’ve been in that emergency room for six years ... in a matter of ten minutes, I am no longer,” Duke said, according to the AOL article. “This post that has gotten me fired was a picture of an empty trauma room with a comment underneath.”

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Jun 18 2014
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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, June 2014

This is part of the June 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

“A registered professional school nurse is the only person [who] has the education, the training, and the skill level to meet the needs of kids in the schools. It’s all about what the kids need and how can they attend schools, be healthy, and learn. Health and education go together: If a child is not healthy, he can’t learn.”
--Sue Buswell, RN, director, Montana Association of School Nurses, Philadelphia Tragedy Highlights Role of School Nurses, Education Week, June 2, 2014

“I quite frankly don’t understand how a school can function without a school nurse. They really are one of the most cost-effective, unrecognized resources in our country.”
--Anne Sheetz, MPH, RN, NEA-BC, director, school health services, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, School Nurses Save, Not Cost Money, New Study Says, Philadelphia Inquirer, May 29, 2014

“And lest we forget: a heartfelt thanks to all nurses, present and past, who are or have served in the military in any capacity, in some cases losing their lives as they tried to save other lives and heal the wounded. And to their families.”
--Jacob Molyneux, BA, MFA, senior editor and blog editor, American Journal of Nursing, Memorial Day Weekend: Thanks to the Nurses Who Served, May 23, 2014

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Jun 18 2014
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Jun 17 2014
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In the Media: Summer Reading

This is part of the June 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Nurse history buffs have two new titles to choose from this summer reading season.

In Nurses and Midwives in Nazi Germany: The“Euthanasia Programs,” Susan C. Benedict, CRNA, PhD, FAAN, professor of nursing and ethics at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, tells the harrowing tale of how ethics in nursing and midwifery were abrogated during the Nazi era. Edited by Benedict and Linda Shields, MD, PhD, BSN, professor of nursing at James Cook University in Australia, the book was published in April.

Another new history book, by author Mary Cronk Farrell, tells a heroic story of nursing during World War II. Released in February and targeted at young readers, Pure Grit: How American World War II Nurses Survived Battle and Prison Camp in the Pacific, tells the inspiring story of American Army and Navy nurses serving in the Philippines who survived three years as prisoners of war.

The bookshelves are also offering a host of new nursing memoirs, including Duty Shoes: A Nurse’s Memoir, by Camille Foshee-Mason, RN; The Last Visit: Reflections of a Hospice Nurse, by Margaret Pecoraro Dodson, RN; and Whose Death Is It, Anyway?: A Hospice Nurse Remembers, by Sharon White, RN, BSN. 

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Jun 17 2014
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Recent Research About Nursing, June 2014

This is part of the June 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Research Compares Nurse and Physician Prescription Practices

A newly published systematic review of more than four decades of research on nurse prescribing finds that in the U.S. states and foreign countries in which nurses are allowed to prescribe, their prescription practices are similar to those of physicians, but their patients report higher satisfaction with their care and are more likely to return for follow-up visits.

The review was conducted by a team of researchers in the Netherlands—one of several countries in which nurses may prescribe. The team screened all studies they could find on the subject dating back to 1974, finally identifying 35 studies that met their criteria, including 13 from the United States, 12 from the United Kingdom, five from the Netherlands, two from Canada, two from Norway, and one from Colombia. The studies’ methods and specific topics varied, but the team conducting the review identified a number of trends in the research. They wrote:

  • “Our findings suggest that nurses prescribe for a wide range of patients and in comparable ways to physicians. Overall, nurses appear to prescribe for just as many patients as physicians do, nurses prescribe comparable numbers of medicines per patient visit and there appear to be few differences between nurses and physicians in the type and dose of medication prescribed and in clinical outcomes.

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May 30 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The May 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the May issue.

Nursing Job Outlook Sunny

Nursing graduates can take heart from long-term projections that show they have one of the hottest degrees around. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that more than half a million positions for registered nurses (RNs) will open between 2012 and 2022. An additional 525,000 nurses will be needed to replace those leaving the field. However, experts say that regional variations in employment opportunities for nurses should be expected. The outlook is especially good for nurses with bachelor’s degrees in nursing (BSNs) and higher.

Study: Nursing School Diversity Initiatives Mostly Successful

Do “pipeline programs” aimed at increasing student diversity in nursing schools actually work? The answer is ‘Yes...but,’ according to a study led by J. Margo Brooks Carthon, PhD, APRN, an alumnus of the RWJF New Connections program and an RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholar. Her study found that significantly more Latino and Asian students enrolled in nursing schools with pipeline programs than without, but enrollment among Native American and Alaskan Indian students decreased at pipeline schools.

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