Category Archives: Sharing Nursing's Knowledge

Apr 14 2014
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Apr 7 2014
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In the Media: Mental Health Nurse Rocks Literary World

This is part of the April 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

A nurse author is making a grand entrance on the literary scene.

British nurse Nathan Filer, 33, won a prestigious literary prize last month for his debut novel about mourning and mental illness. The book won the United Kingdom’s 2013 Costa Book of the Year award, which carries a prize of nearly $50,000.

Called Where the Moon Isn’t (and The Shock of the Fall in the U.K.), the novel tells the tale of a young schizophrenic who witnessed the death of his younger brother and winds up in a mental health institution.

It draws on Filer’s professional experience as a mental health nurse; he has worked in psychiatric wards for more than a decade.

“For a first novel it is astonishingly sure-footed. ... I think there is genuine excitement about this winner,” chief judge Rose Tremai said, according to a blog post on National Public Radio. “It is not just about schizophrenia—it is about grief.” 

Filer has said that he intends to remain active in nursing despite his newfound literary success.

Apr 7 2014
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Recent Research About Nursing, April 2014

This is part of the April 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

ICU Staffing’s Impact on Patient Outcomes

A nurse-led study from the United Kingdom has found that higher numbers of doctors and nurses in intensive care units (ICUs) have a positive effect on survival rates for high-risk patients.

A research team led by Elizabeth West, PhD, MSc, RN, Director of Research in the School of Health and Social Care at the University of Greenwich, used data on 38,000 patients in 65 ICUs in the United Kingdom, correlating patient outcomes with staffing levels for doctors, nurses, and support staff. They found that “higher numbers of nurses per bed ... and higher numbers of ‘consultants’ [senior hospital-based physicians or surgeons] were associated with higher survival rates. Further exploration revealed that the number of nurses had the greatest impact on patients at high risk of death.”

“It seems reasonable to argue,” the researchers conclude, “that skilled nurses, who have the time to observe patients closely, to intervene or mobilise the team if they begin to deteriorate, would be most important to patients who are at the greatest risk. This study is the first to produce evidence that this is the case.” Their findings are published in the May 2014 issue of the International Journal of Nursing Studies.

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Mar 17 2014
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In the Media: Medical Leader Has Epiphany About Nurses

This is part of the March 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

It took Arnold S. Relman, MD, one of the nation’s foremost medical thinkers, nine decades and a full-blown medical catastrophe to fully appreciate the value of nurses, according to an essay he penned in the Feb. 6 edition of the New York Review of Books.

Relman, 90, a doctor, a professor emeritus at Harvard Medical School, and a former editor of the New England Journal of Medicine, learned this lesson the hard way: as a patient. Last summer, Relman fell down the stairs and suffered life-threatening injuries—and discovered the critical role nurses play in health and health care during his lengthy recovery.

He shared his late-in-life epiphany in his recent essay: “I had never before understood how much good nursing care contributes to patients’ safety and comfort, especially when they are very sick or disabled,” he wrote. “This is a lesson all physicians and hospital administrators should learn. When nursing is not optimal, patient care is never good.”

Relman’s remarks spawned a surprise reaction from Lawrence K. Altman, MD, who begged the following question in a post on the New York Times Well Blog: “How is it that a leading medical professor like Dr. Relman—who has taught hundreds of young doctors at Boston University, the University of Pennsylvania (where he was chairman of the department of medicine) and Harvard—might not have known about the value of modern-day Florence Nightingales?”

What do you think?  Do medical educators and scholars fully appreciate the contributions nurses make? Register and leave a comment. 

Mar 17 2014
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Mar 12 2014
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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, March 2014

This is part of the March 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

“There has been tremendous growth in the nurse-managed health clinics, especially prior to the Affordable Care Act implementation, but certainly also now. I would go as far [as] to say that we won’t have a successful implementation of the Affordable Care Act if we don’t utilize nurse practitioners in primary care roles.”
--Tine Hansen-Turton, MGA, JD, CEO, National Nursing Centers Consortium, Nurse-Led Clinics: No Doctors Required, Marketplace Healthcare, March 5, 2014

“A lack of representative educators may send a signal to potential students that nursing does not value diversity. Students looking for academic role models to encourage and enrich their learning are often frustrated in their attempts to find mentors and a community of support. Clearly, we have a mandate to support and encourage nurses from minority groups in their quest to seek advanced degrees and to assume leadership roles in nursing education.”
--Jane Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN, president, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Diversity in Nursing Education, Advance for Nurses, February 26, 2014

“The question for every nurse and every hospital board is how you go about promoting transformational change in which the emphasis is not on transitory, isolated performance improvements by individuals, but on sustained, assimilated, comprehensive change of the whole ... this report offers one answer: nurse leaders knowledgeable about how information technology can help redesign practices so that they are standardized, evidence-based and clinically integrated, and reinforce the values of a caring culture.”
--Angela Barron McBride, PhD, RN, FAAN, author of The Growth and Development of Nurse Leaders, TIGER Releases Study Aimed at Enhancing Nursing Informatics Education, Advanced Healthcare Network for Nurses, February 24, 2014

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Mar 12 2014
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Recent Research About Nursing, March 2014

This is part of the March 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Comparing Nurse and Physician Performance on Colonoscopies

A new study finds that colonoscopies performed by nurse and physician endoscopy trainees are comparable in terms of quality and safety.

Researchers in The Netherlands studied 15 endoscopy trainees—seven nurses and eight physicians—at two medical centers over the course of three-and-a-half years. At the beginning of the study, none had experience in endoscopy. All were trained according to the applicable regulations of the Dutch Society of Gastroenterology, performing a minimum of 100 colonoscopies. After completing their training, each performed 135 consecutive colonoscopies under the supervision of a gastroenterologist, with their work evaluated for safety and quality.

The nurse group and the physician group had comparable results on both measures, with the nurse group producing marginally better scores in some areas. Each group detected the same percentage of adenomas (benign polyps), and had the same low rate of complications. The nurses had slightly higher rates of cecal intubation (successfully passing the colonoscope to a key part of the colon), and slightly higher rates of completing the procedure without assistance.

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Feb 27 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The February 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the February issue.

Preparing Nurses for Leadership in Public Policy
Many nurse education programs, including those that confer doctoral degrees, fall short in educating nurses about public policy, leaving them unprepared to maximize their expertise in policy arenas. To help change that, the RWJF Nursing and Health Policy Collaborative at the University of New Mexico hosted a recent conference that brought together leading nurse educators, public policy experts, social scientists, and others. The goal was to identify and share effective ways to prepare students in doctoral (PhD and DNP) nursing programs to be health policy leaders. Talking to lawmakers is “high-stakes communication,” one speaker said, and nurses need to know how to do it.

Nurse Leader Urges Nurses to Study Political Science, Too
Nancy Ridenour, PhD, APRN, FAAN, has combined a lifelong passion for policy with a drive to improve public health. Throughout her career, she has fought state laws that prevented Nurse Practitioners from practicing to the top of their education and training, and spoken out on health policies affecting access to care for patients in rural communities. “Policy is a tool to foster social change. Leadership and expertise in health policy ensure that nursing expertise is used to improve the health of the nation,” Ridenour says.

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Feb 21 2014
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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, February 2014

This is part of the February 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

“As an ADN-prepared nurse returning to school, I have been confronted with the formidable gap between the current reality of professional nursing and the push to elevate the level and scope of practice in the face of a projected nursing shortage. I have no doubt that higher levels of education, certification, and experience have the potential to create better nurses and in turn safer environments for our patients, but I do have to question whether the infrastructure necessary to support these changes is in place.”
--Eric Deane, RN, Charlottesville, Va., Thoughts on Entry to Practice, Nurse.com, February 10, 2014

“As medical professionals we are recognizing that on a national level, advanced practice nurses [APNs] are part of the solution to the health care access crisis. The only way that patients are going to get the care they need is if all parts of the medical team, including APNs, midwives, physician’s assistants, physicians, and others, come together as partners. It’s not that nurse practitioners are going to replace any other clinicians. That’s not our goal. But advanced practice nurses are extraordinarily well prepared to provide primary care. They are trained in managing multiple types of health problems and in promoting a healthy lifestyle. With the current challenges in patient care, I can only see the role of the nurse practitioner increasing.”
--Ivy Alexander, PhD, APRN, FAAN, clinical professor and director of advanced practice programs, University of Connecticut School of Nursing, An Expanding Role for Nurse Practitioners, Medical Xpress, February 5, 2014

“More needs to be done to help spread awareness [about the Affordable Care Act]. This is one of the things nurses do best. They educate.”
--Mary Wakefield, PhD, RN, FAAN, administrator, Health Resources & Services Administration, Nurses Step Out to Help with ACA Enrollment, Nursezone.com, January 31, 2014

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Feb 18 2014
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Recent Research About Nursing, February 2014

This is part of the February 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Nurses’ Perceptions of Their Workplaces

A new survey offers insights into how hospital nurses perceive their workplace and profession. Jackson Healthcare, a health care staffing company, surveyed 1,333 hospital nurses. Among the findings:

  • Nearly two-thirds of surveyed nurses (64 percent) say they are satisfied or very satisfied with their jobs.
  • Sixty-seven percent say they have less time at patients’ bedsides than they wish because they must perform activities that other hospital personnel could be doing, including looking for equipment and supplies, and restocking supply areas.
  • Sixty-six percent cite inadequate staffing levels in their hospitals, saying that limited coverage and clinical support force nurses to divide their time between more patients.
  • Almost half of nurses surveyed reported a nursing shortage at one or more of the units in their hospitals, with 35 percent citing the medical-surgical department as short-staffed, 18 percent pointing to critical care, and 17 percent to the emergency department.

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