Category Archives: Sharing Nursing's Knowledge

Oct 21 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The October 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research and trends relating to academic progression, leadership and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the October issue.

Campaign Helps Advance Institute of Medicine's Call for More Nurse Leaders
On the fourth anniversary of the release of the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) landmark report on the future of the nursing profession, more nurse leaders are stepping into positions of power and influence—and efforts to prepare even more nurses for leadership are gaining ground. Today, the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action is putting new emphasis on the report’s leadership recommendation, and nurses and their employers in government and other sectors are responding. The Campaign is a joint initiative of RWJF and AARP.

Nursing Improvements Could Boost Outcomes for 7 Out of 10 Critically Ill Black Babies
A new study funded by RWJF’s Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative and the National Institute of Nursing Research provides insight into the issue of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, who are disproportionately black. Researchers found that nurse understaffing and practice environments were worse at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, contributing to adverse outcomes for VLBW infants born in those facilities.

California has “Well-Educated” Nurse Force, Study Finds
While California has a “well-educated” nurse force, a survey published by the state’s Board of Registered Nursing shows that there is a long way to go toward meeting the goal set forth by the Institute of Medicine’s landmark report on the future of nursing that 80 percent of nurses hold bachelor’s degrees or higher by 2020. About 60 percent of the state’s registered nurses have earned a bachelor’s or graduate degree in nursing or another field, the survey found. Nearly 40 percent of respondents—and nearly 80 percent of those under 35—said they are considering or seriously considering additional education.

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Oct 17 2014
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Stay Up to Date with RWJF!

Want to stay on top of the latest news from RWJF? Check out all the ways you can get the latest news delivered to you:

·         Sign up for Content Alerts, newsletters, and funding alerts

·         Read the Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge e-newsletter, then subscribe

·         Sign up to receive Charting Nursing’s Future policy briefs

·         Stay up to date on the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action

Oct 3 2014
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Recent Research About Nursing, October 2014

This is part of the October 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Study: California’s Mandatory Nurse-Patient Ratio Law Reduces Work-Related Injuries

A 2004 California law mandating specific nurse-to-patient staffing standards in acute care hospitals has significantly reduced job-related injuries and illnesses for nurses, according to a study published online by the International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health.

A team of researchers from the Schools of Medicine and Nursing at the University of California, Davis used data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics to compare illness and injury rates in California and other states before and after the law’s implementation. The data documented a downward trend nationwide, but also found that California’s workplace injury and illness rate declined even faster than the national rate.

In California, the researchers estimated that the law resulted in an average decline from 176 to 120 injuries and illnesses per 10,000 registered nurses—a 32-percent reduction. For licensed practical nurses, the rate went from 244 injuries to 161 per 10,000—a 34-percent reduction.

Lead author J. Paul Leigh, PhD, speculated in a news release that having more nurses available to help with repositioning patients in bed could help prevent back and shoulder injuries. Similarly, needle-stick injuries could be less common because nurses now conduct blood draws and other procedures in a less time-pressured manner.

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Oct 2 2014
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In the Media: New Annual Event Honors Federal Nurses

This is part of the October 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Every May, the news media zooms in on nurses during National Nurses Week, held the second week of the month in honor of Florence Nightingale’s birthday.

Now, nurses are getting another turn in the media spotlight—but this time in September.

Or at least that’s the goal of Federal Nurses Week, a new annual event held in recognition of the nation’s 100,000 federally employed nurses. The event, held this year between Sept. 22 and Sept. 28, is sponsored by the American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE). J. David Cox, RN, national president of AFGE, is a nurse and also serves on the national executive board of the AFL-CIO.

During the week, supporters were encouraged to host an event to recognize a federal nurse or nurses and spread the word about the importance of federal nurses through posts to social media sites or letters to the editor of newspapers or other publications. AFGE is also urging Congress to pass a resolution recognizing the federal nurse workforce.

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Oct 1 2014
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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, October 2014

This is part of the October 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

“I’ve learned over the last couple of years, as my mother came to rely more on nursing assistance at home for daily tasks, that health care is all about what happens between people. It’s the relationship of trust between the patient and family members and a universe of medical professionals. Nowhere is the relationship more vital than between patient and nurse.

Nurses are the front line of care. Doctors parachute into our world and we into theirs, but nurses stay on the ground from crucial moment to moment.”
--Marsha Mercer, independent journalist, They Put the ‘Care’ in Health Care, The (Lynchburg, Va.) News & Advance, Sept. 28, 2014

“Unfortunately, due to the culture of the health care industry, nurses have usually taken a back seat to physicians and administrators when it comes to changing the policies and practices of optimizing care. However, there is a wealth of evidence that points to the vital and increasing leadership role nurses are taking in health care practices around the country.  ... The message to hospital administrators should be clear—if you’re looking to improve the quality of care and reduce costs, try talking to the people working on the front lines every day—talk to a nurse.”
--Rob Szczerba, PhD, MS, CEO of X Tech Ventures, Looking to Transform Healthcare? Ask a Nurse, Forbes, September 23, 2014

“I’ve been a nurse for 25 years and love what I do. But when we are forced to work overtime, it adds unnecessary stress, frustration and fatigue that can impair your ability to function at your best. You can’t think straight when you’ve been working 16 hours.”
--Terri Menichelli, Nurse., State Auditor Will Look into Health Care Overtime Law, The Citizen’s Voice (Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania), Sept. 19, 2014 

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Sep 30 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The September 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research and trends relating to academic progression, leadership and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the September issue.

Advocates Work to Recruit Latinos to Nursing
Latinos comprised only 3 percent of the nation’s nursing workforce in 2013, according to a survey by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing and the National Forum of State Workforce Centers, and 17 percent of the nation’s population, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. More Latino nurses can help narrow health disparities, experts say. “Having a culturally competent nurse really makes a difference in terms of compliance and patient outcomes,” said Elias Provencio-Vasquez, PhD, RN, FAAN, FAANP, an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program alumnus. “Patients really respond when they have a provider who understands their culture.”

New Careers in Nursing Program Helps Minnesota College Expand and Diversify While Improving Care in Rural Communities
Since its 2008 launch, the RWJF New Careers in Nursing program (NCIN) has kept a tight focus on attracting a diverse group of “second-career” students to nursing. Along the way, NCIN has had a profound effect on many of the institutions themselves. One such school, the College of St. Scholastica (CSS), saw its overall program change and grow substantially, in great measure because of its participation. NCIN has supported scholarships to 40 CSS accelerated-degree nursing students over the last seven years.

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Sep 16 2014
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Stay Up to Date with RWJF!

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Sep 11 2014
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Recent Research About Nursing, September 2014

This is part of the September 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Lower Hospitalization Rates Linked to Broader NP Scope of Practice

New research correlating state-by-state hospitalization rates with state policies on nurse practitioner (NP) scope of practice offers a revealing conclusion: Medicare and Medicaid patients are less likely to require hospitalization in states that allow NPs a broader scope of practice.

A team of researchers from the University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing examined hospitalization data from a range of sources that sorted data by state, and then compared it with American Association of Nurse Practitioners data on state laws and regulations governing NP scope of practice. They found “a significant relationship between full practice of NPs and decreased hospitalization rates of Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries in the United States and improved health outcomes of states.”

The researchers caution that the data do not prove a causal relationship between scope of practice and hospitalization rates, but write, “Our findings support the increasing call of facilitating Advanced Practice Registered Nurses [APRNs] to fulfill their full scope of practice in providing access and care to patients without direct or indirect supervision from physicians. The outcomes support the Institute of Medicine recommendation that APRNs practice to their full scope of practice including functioning as primary care providers.”

The study was published online by Nursing Outlook on August 4, 2014.

Read an abstract of the study or a news article on it in McKnight’s.

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Sep 9 2014
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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, September 2014

This is part of the September 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

“Changing cultural norms within the nursing profession will require efforts from all parties: from nursing graduates, in treating their colleagues with respect and raising awareness by reporting incidents; from nursing leaders, in leading by example to foster supportive behaviors and promote a healthy work environment; from health care institutions, in setting zero tolerance disciplinary policies and empowering staff to report on issues without fear of retaliation; and from academic institutions, in preparing students with conflict management skills to address situations as they arise.”
--Susan Sanders, DNP, RN, NEA-BC, vice president, Kaplan Nursing, Bullying a Rising Concern for New Nurses, U.S. News & World Report, September 3, 2014

“It is time to stop wringing our hands that there are inadequate MDs wanting to provide primary care service. There is a very synergistic way that medicine and advanced practice nursing can work together, capitalize on the strengths that each discipline brings to the table, and maximize the patient experience and the outcomes. This is a new model.”
--Rosemary Dale, EdD, professor of nursing, University of Vermont, New Health Care Model Tested in BurlingtonBurlington Free Press, August 30, 2014

“The numbers speak for themselves. As the demographics change and more ethnically and racially diverse populations grow, there will definitely continue to be a need for health care providers who mirror these patients.”
--Eva Gomez, MSN, RN-BC, CPN, staff development specialist, Children’s Hospital in Boston, Push to Recruit Black, Latino Nurses, Washington Informer, August 27, 2014

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Sep 9 2014
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In the Media: TV Show Zooms in on Birthplace of Midwifery in America

This is part of the September 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Nurse-midwifery took a turn in the media spotlight last month during a television talk show in Kentucky, the “birthplace” of midwifery and family nursing practice in America.

In a half-hour segment on Kentucky Educational Television, TV host Renee Shaw interviewed officials from Frontier Nursing University, the longest continuously operating and largest midwifery program in the country. The university will mark its 75th anniversary in October.

Nurse midwives and nurse practitioners “really want to make their community a better place, and they know from working in the system that, as nurses, they can do that,” said Julie Marfell, DNP, APRN, FAANP, dean of nursing at Frontier Nursing University.

Midwifery got its official start in America thanks to Mary Breckenridge, a nurse from a prominent political family who was born in the 1880s. After the deaths of her first husband and both of her children, Breckinridge decided to devote her life to improving health and health care. In 1925, she founded the Frontier Nursing Service in Hyden, Ky., a remote and unserved part of the country, so she could bring British midwifery practices to the United States. The Frontier Nursing Service later added the nation’s first schools of midwifery and family nurse practice.

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