Archive for: January 2014

Investing in Children to Improve the Nation's Health

Jan 27, 2014, 6:28 PM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

RWJF recently convened a panel of distinguished guests for a Google+ Hangout to examine targeted interventions that could help America’s youngest children live healthier, happier, and safer lives. Here's an archived version of the Hangout.

"It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men," wrote Frederick Douglass, the 19th century African-American social reformer, writer and orator. A century and a half later, to improve the health of Americans, it's essential to start with kids.

That’s a preeminent conclusion of the new report of the RWJF Commission to Build a Healthier America called Time to Act: Investing in the Health of Our Children and Communities. The report focuses on ways to influence the upstream determinants of Americans' generally poor health, including low levels of education and incomes, unsafe environments, and non-nutritious food. Of the panel's three top recommendations, the first is distinctly child-centric: "Invest in the foundations of lifelong physical and mental well-being of our youngest children." Were he alive today, Douglass would surely agree.

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On the Way to Better Health, a Call to Educate the Consumer With Complete and Useful Information

Jan 24, 2014, 2:41 PM, Posted by Tara Oakman

“An educated consumer is our best customer...”

A big sign with these words welcomed me and others into the local department store, Syms. I’m definitely not the only one who noticed. In fact, an educated consumer of this blog would know that it resonated with Susan Dentzer as well.

As a child, this statement baffled me. On the plus side, pondering its meaning gave me something to do during seemingly interminable shopping expeditions with my parents. Why, I wondered, does a department store care about how much consumers know? Don’t they just want them to buy clothes?

Now I get it.

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Simple, Small Changes Can Lead to Healthier Food Choices

Jan 21, 2014, 11:20 AM, Posted by Deborah Bae

Culture of Health Blog Post Framed Traffic Light

At this time of year, many of us find ourselves trying hard to stick to that New Year’s resolution to eat healthier. Here is some good news: simple changes in our environment can have meaningful, sustained effects on our ability to make healthy food choices.

Committing to a healthier diet and trying to lose weight is hard, and many people believe they can do it as long as they have the right motivation and attitude. We’ll say things like, “I’m going to eat better” or “I’m going to eat fewer unhealthy foods.” But that commitment can be tough when people face a variety of unhealthy choices and just a few healthy ones. Or when it’s hard to tell which is which.

Researcher and physician Anne Thorndike and her colleagues at Massachusetts General Hospital tested a novel idea: if all healthy food and drinks sold in the hospital cafeteria were labeled green, and all unhealthy items had red labels, would people make healthier choices?

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Reforms in Oregon’s Medicaid Program and Emergency Department Use

Jan 16, 2014, 5:23 PM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

 Inter Professional Nursing

“Past performance is no guarantee of future results,” goes the boilerplate warning on financial investments. The caution is worth keeping in mind in the wake of a recently published study that found that expanding Oregon’s Medicaid program in 2008 led to a 41 percent increase in emergency department (ED) use by many of those newly covered by the program.

The study, by an esteemed group of researchers (some of whom are affiliated with the National Bureau of Economic Research) is the latest to emerge from the Oregon Health Insurance Experiment. This series has focused on the effects of 2008-2009 policy changes that led thousands of previously uninsured Oregonians to enroll in Medicaid. The latest study found that costly visits to the ED rose across the board over a two-year period, including for relatively simple conditions, such as headaches, that could easily have been treated in primary care settings.

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And the Winner is … Streetlights, for Applying Big Data to Community Health

Jan 15, 2014, 12:41 PM, Posted by Paul Tarini

Cropped Streetlight project

Big data, the buzzword of choice these days in information technology, holds the promise of transforming health care as programmers and policy-makers figure out how to mine trillions of ones and zeros for information about the best (and worst) health practices, disease and lifestyle trends, interconnections, and insights. The problem is, where to start? To jump start the process, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation joined in a Knight News Challenge: Health and issued its own call to developers to come up with innovative ways to combine public health and health care data, with a $50,000 prize to the best idea.

The results are in. When the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation announced the winners of its News Challenge for ideas focused on unlocking the power of health data on January 15—you can see the list here—we also announced the winner of our companion prize for the best entries who combined public health data with data from health care to improve the health of communities. Our first place winner is the Streetlights Project from Chicago.

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The Smoking Generation

Jan 13, 2014, 11:06 AM, Posted by Jeff Meade

Chuck and Jean Meade Chuck and Jean on their wedding day

When I was a little kid growing up in Norwich, N.Y., I earned candy money by helping out at Saturday night bingo, held in the basement hall of St. Bartholomew Church.

By "helping out," I mean taking orders (and collecting tips) from the little old ladies who were so focused on their bingo cards that they could not leave the table long enough to get themselves a drink or a snack.

Virtually all of those old ladies smoked. A blue-gray haze hung over the room like a dingy veil. I might as well have been chain-smoking Lucky Strikes the whole night.

When those old ladies placed their orders, their vocal chords coarsened by decades of smoking—“Get me a meatball sandwich, will ya, hon?" —they sounded to my impressionable young ears like the tough-guy character actor Broderick Crawford. (The little mustaches, perhaps, completed the illusion.)

People younger than I am probably can't imagine what it was like to live in that world, a world in which smoking was ubiquitous.

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