The Ripple Effect of Asthma Programming

Nov 1, 2013, 2:58 PM, Posted by Molly McKaughan

There was once a small boy. He was 5 years old, and he lived in a neighborhood of Washington, D.C., in an environment that was rife with potential triggers for asthma.

Back in 2006, we wrote about this boy in a report assessing the impact of one of our programs, Managing Pediatric Asthma.

JH, as we called him then, was enrolled in that program. And with good reason. He coughed and wheezed four days out of every seven, and had made four visits to the emergency department at Children’s National Medical Center in the previous year.

It’s been a long time since I’d thought about JH, but his compelling story came flooding back to me when I read a recent story in the Washington Post about an asthma clinic at this same hospital.  It teaches families of kids with asthma, kids like JH, how to manage the condition with medication, ultimately reducing the number of trips to the emergency room.

According to the Post article, “The clinic has had some success. ER visit rates for asthma have fallen by 40 percent, even as the prevalence of asthma continues to rise.”

Those hopeful results reminded me of JH and other kids just like him, and of RWJF’s important investment in pediatric asthma. The story demonstrates how one program can have such a ripple effect—making a big difference, not only in the life of one very small boy years ago, but in the lives of children with asthma living in Washington today.