Now Viewing: Health records/electronic health records

The Doctor Will Share With You Now

Apr 17, 2014, 4:43 PM, Posted by Risa Lavizzo-Mourey

Elaine Benes Seinfeld Screen Grab for Risa OpenNotes LinkedIn blog post

What does an episode of the Seinfeld show have in common with an RWJF national initiative?

In the first case, Seinfeld character Elaine Benes gets to see the notes written about her by her doctor. In the second, OpenNotes promotes exactly the same thing—patient access to the visit notes written by their doctors.

In Elaine’s case, that access was accidental. She took a quick look at her chart, only to see herself described as “difficult.” And merriment ensued.

Under the OpenNotes initiative, which started in 2010, Elaine would have been able to check out her doctor visit notes via a web-based portal. She wouldn’t have needed to sneak a peek. It’s unlikely she would have been described as “difficult.”

Numerous studies show that patients do want to see their records, and the evidence suggests that when they do, it leads to better health.

In a new post on the professional social networking site LinkedIn, RWJF President and CEO Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, notes that the concept is catching on, and OpenNotes is leading the charge. “OpenNotes will lead not only to a more efficient health care system,” she writes, “but better health for all of us.”

Read Lavizzo-Mourey’s LinkedIn post

Building a Better EMR

Aug 5, 2013, 9:43 AM, Posted by Kyna Fong

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As co-founder of ElationEMR, Kyna Fong and her brother Conan hope to revolutionize the way physicians use electronic medical records (EMRs). In this blog post, Fong, a former Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Scholar in Health Policy Research (2008-2010) and assistant professor of economics at Stanford University, explains how her new product helps physicians and nurses embrace the future of medicine. You can read more about how technology is being used in health care settings here.

Caring for patients is becoming increasingly complex. A whopping 68 percent of Medicare beneficiaries have multiple chronic conditions and, of those, 54 percent have four or more.

There is no doubt that innovations in information technology are essential to meeting this challenge and improving the quality and effectiveness of health care. New data streams are creating increasingly rich stories of our individual health—chronicling how we eat, sleep, exercise, and even what our genes predict.

New modes of delivering care are arising as new technologies offer more precise, more accessible vehicles to manage our health, including telemedicine, remote monitoring, connected messaging, and smart devices. What’s blatantly missing in these tools of the future, however, is a full understanding of how to connect with the key individuals who deliver care: physicians and nurses.

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Electronic Health Records: Are We There Yet? What’s Taking So Long?

Jun 4, 2013, 4:48 PM, Posted by Mike Painter

A doctor seeking information on a computer, two nurses are in the background.

I am a family physician, but one who doesn’t currently practice and importantly, one who isn’t slogging day after day through health care transformation. I do not want to be presumptuous here because the doctors and other health professionals who are doing this hard work are the heroes. They are caring for patients while at the same time facing tremendous pressure to transform their life’s work.  That includes overwhelming pressure to adopt and use new information technology.

This level of change is hard, difficult and confusing—with both forward progress and slips backward. Nevertheless, doctors, take heart, because you are making progress. It may be slow at times, but it’s substantial—and it’s impressive. Thank you. 

The Annals of Internal Medicine today published a study (I was one of the authors) finding that more than 40 percent of U.S. physicians have adopted at least a basic electronic health record (EHR),  highlighting continued progress in the rate of national physician adoption of EHRs. The study, also found that a much smaller number, about 9.8 percent of physicians, are ready for meaningful use of this new technology. 

Some might say, “Wake up, folks!”   Look at those small meaningful use numbers.  Change course, now.  After all of this time and tax-payer expense, less than 10 percent of doctors are actually ready to use these important tools meaningfully. What’s up with that? 

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