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The Legacy of PIN: A New Level of Collaboration in the Pacific

Dec 17, 2014, 9:00 AM

Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN), an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), was represented in the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) by two partnerships: Building Nursing Faculty Capacity in the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands, which brought together the American Pacific Nurse Leaders Council, the World Health Organization and others to strengthen nursing education in the USAPI; and Step by Step, Hand in Hand: Expanding PIN Synergies in the Pacific, which introduced the Dreyfus Health Foundation’s Problem Solving for Better Health® (PSBH®) model to effect change within nursing education and within communities. 

As part of a series of posts on PIN’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities, a number of the USAPI partners have responded to the question: What do you think has been the major impact of the Pacific PIN?

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“Since the first meeting of the Pacific PIN, we have come to learn more about each other’s nursing programs and the common needs that we shared. Through the years, this knowledge has expanded our friendship to those who have patiently stayed with us and directed us toward sharing resources and seeking new learning experiences, all to increase the number of qualified nurses for the Pacific region. I am most grateful to the foundations that were directly involved and the special people who made this all possible. Fa’afetai tele.”

--Lele Ah Mu, RN, BSN, Chair, Nursing Department, American Samoa Community College, American Samoa

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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, December 2014

Dec 16, 2014, 9:07 AM

This is part of the December 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

“This holiday season, my one wish is that every nurse knows their worth and that every patient knows theirs.”
--Shelly Lopez Gray, RN, blogger, Adventures of Labor Nurse: The Highs and Lows of Labor and Delivery, A Nurse’s Wish in Labor and Delivery, Huffington Post Parents, Dec. 8, 2014

“Nurses have new and expanding roles. They are case managers, helping patients navigate the maze of health care choices and develop plans of care. They are patient educators who focus on preventative care in a multitude of settings outside hospitals. And they are leaders, always identifying ways for their practice to improve. Because nurses have the most direct patient care, they have much influence on serious treatment decisions. It is a very high stakes job. Everyone wants the best nurse for the job, and that equates to the best educated nurse.”
--Judy Evans, MS, RN, associate professor of nursing, Colorado Mountain College, Patients Benefit When Nurses Have Advanced Education, The Glenwood Springs Post Independent, Dec. 7, 2014

“Nurses are not just doers. Our work is supported by evidence and guided by theory. We integrate evidence and theory with our knowledge of patients and make important decisions with and for patients and families at the point of care. Research and practice are not separate but integrated. Nursing is a practice discipline with our own theories and research base that we both generate, use, and disseminate to others.”
--Antonia Villarruel, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor and Margaret Bond Simon Dean of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Q&A with Antonia Villarruel, Penn Current, Nov. 20, 2014

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Recent Research About Nursing, December 2014

Dec 11, 2014, 1:00 PM

This is part of the December 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Study: ‘Alarm Fatigue’ Poses Danger

After a while, alarms stop being so alarming. That’s the warning growing out of a study of the sheer volume of physiological alarms generated by bedside monitoring systems in hospitals. The barrage of beeps can become so overwhelming that it creates “alarm fatigue,” which in turn can lead nurses and other clinicians to discount the urgency of alarms or to ignore them altogether.

In the study, led by University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Nursing Professor Barbara Drew, PhD, MS, researchers tracked the quantity and accuracy of alarms generated in five intensive care units at the UCSF Medical Center over a 31-day period. They found a high rate of false positives—alarms generated when patients were not in need of treatment beyond what they were already receiving. For example, during that time, researchers counted 12, 671 alarms for arrhythmia, 89 percent of which were false positives. Most of those were the result of problems with the alarm system’s algorithms, incorrect settings, technical malfunctions, or brief heart rate spikes that did not require further attention.

In all, during the 31-day period, the systems generated an average of 187 alarms per patient bed per day, adding up to more than 380,000 audible alarms over the course of the month, across the five ICUs.

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In the Media: New Exhibits Shine Light on the History of Nursing

Dec 11, 2014, 9:00 AM

This is part of the December 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

On television and in other media, nurses are often portrayed as gendered stereotypes: the angel, the handmaiden, the battle-axe, or the sex-object.

Turns out, these portrayals aren’t new. That is evident in a new postcard exhibit at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Md., that illustrates cultural perceptions of nursing over the last century.

The exhibit, entitled Pictures of Nursing, hails from a collection of more than 2,500 postcards that were donated by Michael Zwerdling, RN. The collection includes postcards that date to the late 1800s, and features images of nurses portrayed as everything from Greek goddesses to Amazon princesses to the Virgin Mary. It also includes rare images of male nurses.

Some of the exhibit’s more contemporary postcards depict nurses in modern uniforms and as skilled members of health care teams—images that counteract sexist and gendered notions of nursing that come through in other postcards.

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The Top Five Issues for Nursing in 2015

Dec 3, 2014, 9:00 AM, Posted by Susan Hassmiller

Susan B. Hassmiller, PhD, RN, FAAN, directs the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Actionwhich is implementing recommendations from that report. Hassmiller also is senior adviser for nursing for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Susan Hassmiller

In 2013, the Institute of Medicine released a report, U.S. Health in International Perspective: Shorter Lives, Poorer Health, that compared the United States with 16 other affluent nations. The United States ranked last or near last on nine key indicators:  infant mortality and low birth weight; injuries and homicides; teenage pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections; prevalence of HIV and AIDS; drug-related deaths; obesity and diabetes; heart disease; chronic lung disease; and disability. This is despite the fact that we spend significantly more on health care than any other nation.

I believe there are five ways nurses can contribute to improving these conditions in 2015. 

Nurses Can Help Us Build a Culture of Health

In a Culture of Health, the goal is to keep everyone as healthy as possible.  That means promoting health is as important as treating illness. Unless everyone in the country joins this effort, we will remain at the bottom of the list of healthiest nations. “Everyone” means all health care workers, business owners, urban planners, teachers, farmers and others, including consumers themselves.  Nurses especially understand wellness and prevention, and have a special role to play in building a Culture of Health. 

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All People, At Any Age or Ability, Have Resilient Potential

Nov 25, 2014, 9:00 AM, Posted by Sarah Szanton

Sarah L. Szanton

Resilience is not just an individual character trait. There are resilient families, communities, and societies. 

Scholars Forum 2014 Logo

Within the individual, there are resilient organs, cells, and genetic expressions. Although many people who experience health disparities are resilient on the individual level—they are optimistic, committed, loving, bright—the groups of people who suffer from health disparities (such as non-English speakers, racial and ethnic minorities, and those living in poverty) draw on their personal resilience daily, but suffer from reduced contact with the resilient potential of communities and society overall. 

To me, building a Culture of Health means developing multiple layers of resilient possibilities so that each person’s cells, organs, families, communities, and society are able to respond to stressors, challenges, and opportunities with resilient potential.

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Conference to Focus on Integrating Policy into Nursing Curricula

Nov 24, 2014, 9:41 AM

Hotel Del Coronado The Hotel Del Coronado in San Diego

The conference will feature interprofessional panels of speakers who will discuss strategies to develop faculty and student expertise in policy analysis and research. Panel topics will include:

  • shaping health policy leadership through doctoral nurse education;
  • exercising health policy leadership through nursing and community organizations;
  • strategies for enriching doctoral health policy education; and
  • integrating health policy content into doctoral nursing programs.

The conference supports RWJF’s work to promote a Culture of Health across America. It aims to support faculty in preparing students to address health policy issues, developing programs of research that relate to health policy, and integrating an understanding of social determinants of health into policy analysis and research.

More information on the conference is here and registration is here.

This commentary originally appeared on the RWJF Human Capital Blog. The views and opinions expressed here are those of the authors.

The Legacy of PIN: An Urban-Rural Model to Increase the Number of Baccalaureate Nurses

Nov 20, 2014, 10:07 AM, Posted by Darlene Curley

Darlene Curley, MS, RN, FAAN, is executive director of the Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare, which served as the lead foundation for the Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) project, Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses (RIBN).

As PIN holds its final national meeting this week, the Human Capital Blog is featuring posts from PIN partners about the program’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities. PIN is an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

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Darlene Curley

Human Capital Blog: Why did the Jonas Center decide to become a part of PIN? What were your goals for the project?

Darlene Curley: There were three things that were attractive about PIN. First, there was this project itself, which was developing a pathway for associate degree to baccalaureate nurses. That’s critical for building a highly educated workforce and a pipeline for preparing the next generation of faculty. The second reason was the partnership funding model. It related to the Jonas Center’s philosophy that we should be funding projects together with others in nursing, but also in interdisciplinary models for health. The third reason was the process of bringing stakeholders together in regions, which was critical. We knew that if we could bring nurse educators, students and other stakeholders together to work on the RIBN project, that group could stay together and work on other projects that were important to nursing and health care as they came along. The third reason was the process of bringing stakeholders together in regions, which was critical. We knew that if we could bring nurse educators, students and other stakeholders together to work on the RIBN project, that group could stay together and work on other projects that were important to nursing and health care as they came along.

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Addressing the Needs of Female Veterans Who Have Experienced Violence and Harassment

Nov 13, 2014, 1:00 PM, Posted by Angela Amar, Jacquelyn Campbell

Jacquelyn Campbell, PhD, RN, FAAN, is director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholars program and Anna D. Wolf chair and professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing.  Angela Amar, PhD, RN, FAAN, is an associate professor at the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing at Emory University and an alumna of the RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars program.

Jacquelyn Campbell Jacquelyn Campbell

As two scholars who have worked in research, practice and policy arenas around issues of gender-based violence for years, we honor our veterans this week by paying tribute to the Pentagon and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for addressing intimate partner and sexual violence among active duty and returning military and their families, and urge continued system-wide involvement and innovative solutions.  

In our work, we’ve heard outrageous, painful stories. One female servicemember explained to Angela why she was ignoring the sexual harassment she experienced. She knew that hearing that she was inferior because she was a woman, being called “Kitty” instead of her name, and having the number 69 used in place of any relevant number was harassing. She knew it was wrong. But she had decided that she would not let it bother her. I can acknowledge that he is a jerk, but I can’t let that affect me.  

Angela Amar Angela Amar

I can’t let his behavior define me as a person. On some level this may seem like an accurate way of dealing with a problem person. However, sexual harassment isn’t just about one obnoxious person. Not telling the story doesn’t make the behavior go away. Rather, it sends the message that the behavior is acceptable and that sexist comments are a normal part of the lexicon of male/female interactions.

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Stony Brook Helps Veterans Become Nurses

Nov 11, 2014, 1:00 PM, Posted by Lori Escallier

Lori Escallier, PhD, RN, CPNP, is a professor and associate dean for evaluation and outcomes at the State University of New York at Stony Brook School of Nursing. She is her university’s project director for a program that helps veterans earn baccalaureate degrees in nursing (VBSN) and for New Careers in Nursing, a program supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) that supports second-career nurses in accelerated master’s and baccalaureate nursing programs.

Lori Escallier

Human Capital Blog: Please tell us about your university’s program for nursing students who are veterans.

Lori Escallier: The project is entitled Enhancing the Nursing Workforce: Career Ladder Opportunities for Veterans. The purpose is to increase the enrollment, retention and educational success of veterans in the baccalaureate nursing program at Stony Brook. Our program operationalizes the collaborative efforts of the Health Resources and Services Administration, the Department of Defense, and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) by providing opportunities for veterans to transition into nursing careers.

HCB: How is the VBSN program helping to build a Culture of Health that more effectively serves veterans?

Escallier: One of the project’s aims is to enhance the nursing workforce with veterans. Veterans certainly have a good understanding of the needs of other veterans and their families. Who better to promote a Culture of Health for veterans than those who have “walked the walk?”

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