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Let's Keep the Payment Reform Momentum Going

Mar 31, 2015, 10:22 AM, Posted by Andrea Ducas

Recent advancements in payment reform have been massive and exciting. It's time to sustain the momentum and transform how we pay for and deliver care.

Hundred Dollar Bill Modified image. Original photo by Ervins Strauhmanis.

When it comes to how health care providers are paid, change is in the air. I’m probably more excited than most people about trying to make sure our financial incentives are flowing the right way within the health care system. Here’s why.

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Looking Back, Looking Ahead: Banding Together to Fight for Health Care Value

Feb 13, 2015, 5:06 PM, Posted by Anne Weiss

L1032033_JHW Key health care stakeholders have joined forces to work toward improved quality of health care available to the rural, low-income population of Humboldt and Del Norte Counties, Calif. (AF4Q)

Sometimes it feels like we take one step forward, two steps back when it comes to making sure that we are getting the best quality health care for the tremendous amount our society invests in it. Maybe sometimes it’s one step forward, three steps back.

But then I think about Aligning Forces for Quality—RWJF’s signature initiative to lift the quality and equality of care in 16 regions around the country—and my hope returns. While progress is slow, it is still progress.

More than 10 years ago, RWJF’s leadership suggested to me that we change course in our health care quality improvement strategy. Instead of testing single interventions in widely scattered sites, they asked, why not focus on a limited number of target communities where we could go deep with multiple approaches? We knew health care is essentially local, though shaped by state and federal policy.

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How Not to Flip Out: Flip the Clinic

Jan 27, 2015, 4:38 PM, Posted by Beth Toner

Flip the Clinic San Francisco January 2015 Hard at work at the first regional Flip the Clinic meeting in San Francisco

“If you’ve been waiting more than 15 minutes, please see the receptionist.”

That’s the sign that was posted on a bulletin board in the radiology clinic where I was waiting for an MRI earlier this month. The funny thing? It was so lost amid the other postings around it screaming for attention that I only saw it on my way out, as I waited for a copy of the disk with my MRI on it. It struck me as odd, and a little concerning; did that mean I should be worried the clinic staff might have forgotten about me if I’d been waiting more than 15 minutes?

Don’t get me wrong: I understand that unpreventable delays happen. For me, the most frustrating aspect of signs like this is that they take the power away from the patient. 

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Achieving Health Care Equity Begins with Relationships

Jan 19, 2015, 9:00 AM

Lisa Cooper

Have you ever had the experience of being sick and in need of help from a health professional? How about having a parent, child, other family member, or friend who had some health issue for which he or she was seeking answers? What was that like for you? How did you feel, and what were you looking for from that doctor, nurse, or therapist?

Did you ever feel afraid, and alone? Confused?  That no one understood what you were going through? Or cared? Or even worse, that the health professionals may have made some assumptions about you or your family member that were wrong – even perhaps blamed you for having your condition or judged you for how you were dealing with it?

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If so, you are not alone. Many people who find themselves in the role of a patient have felt these same feelings and had these same thoughts. And if you are poor, don’t have private health insurance, or if you are a person of color or belong to another minority group in our country, you are more likely than others to encounter these problems.

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RWJF Executive Nurse Fellow Brings Nursing Perspective to Bioethics

Jan 14, 2015, 9:00 AM

Cynda Rushton, PhD, RN, FAAN, is the Anne and George L. Bunting Professor of Clinical Ethics and a professor of nursing and pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University. She is an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellows program (2006-2009). In 2014, she was named a Hastings Center Fellow for her work in bioethics.

Cynda Rushton

Human Capital Blog: Congratulations on being named a 2014 Hastings Center Fellow. What does this fellowship mean for you and your career?

Cynda Rushton: It’s a wonderful honor to be included in this interprofessional group of scholars of bioethics. It’s a terrific opportunity to cross-pollinate with great thinkers and leaders and to think about some of the most vexing ethical issues in health care. It’s going to be a rich container for dialogue, learning, and leadership.

HCB: How will the fellowship work?

Rushton: Fellows have the opportunity to help guide the direction of the Hastings Center, which is an independent, non-partisan and nonprofit bioethics research institute in New York. The center’s mission is to address fundamental ethical issues in the areas of health, medicine, and the environment, and we’ll be bringing up issues that we think deserve more in-depth scholarship and research. This summer, we’re having a retreat where we will be able to work together around issues of common concern, particularly in the area of bioethics.

HCB: What will you focus on as a fellow?

Rushton: My focus has been on how to create a culture of ethical practice in health care. I’m interested in what is required to create that culture and what kind of individual competencies need to be in place to support people to practice ethically and reduce moral distress.

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Understanding Microcultures of Health: It’s Time for a ‘Deep Dive’ into Culture & Social Networks to Produce Lasting Health Change

Jan 6, 2015, 9:00 AM

Jason M. Fletcher, PhD, is associate professor at the La Follette School of Public Affairs, Department of Sociology, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, and Department of Population Health Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is an alumnus of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholars program at Columbia University, where he researched the intersection of health and social networks.

Jason Fletcher

While an important priority for improving health and health care in the United States is in focusing on broad notions, such as creating a Culture of Health, there is also a need to consider targeted approaches that make use of the structure of relationships that influence health. Most people consider only a small number of social contacts when discussing important matters. Even though our Facebook friends number in the hundreds or thousands, the number with whom we share close and regular geographic or social space is considerably smaller. Network science is leading the way in uncovering what our microcultures look like and how they operate; these findings should be put to further use to improve population health.

These “small worlds” of influence are known to have substantial impacts on health—as shown by numerous careful, gold-standard empirical studies. College freshman who are randomly assigned a roommate who binge drinks are more likely to binge drink, themselves. Adults whose spouses stop smoking through a clinical intervention are themselves much more likely to stop smoking. These positive and negative impacts on health spread not through broad culture but through the “microcultures” of close social ties.

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'We Need People to be Incensed by the Health Inequality that Persists in This Country'

Jan 5, 2015, 9:00 AM

Felesia Bowen, PhD, PCPNP-BC, is an assistant professor at Rutgers University School of Nursing, and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholar (2014-2017). Her research focuses on community-based pediatric asthma care.

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When I first began working as a pediatric nurse in New Jersey 20 years ago, I was committed to getting asthma care right. I worked hard to educate my young patients and their families about the disease, how to avoid the triggers that cause attacks, and how to use their medications. I wrote asthma action plans and prescribed the correct medications to control symptoms. 

It wasn’t always enough. One Monday morning, one of my young patients experienced asthma symptoms. The family followed his asthma action plan, “stepping” his medications in an effort to relieve his asthma symptoms. On Tuesday, he wasn’t feeling better, and went to the nurse practitioner (NP) in his school’s health office, who appropriately modified his treatment plan and called the asthma specialist to get a next-day appointment for him.

She remembers the young man telling her that he really needed to feel better, because he was going to his middle school graduation dance Wednesday night. On Thursday morning, he visited the NP again, still with asthma symptoms. He told her that he had missed the appointment with the asthma specialist because his mom couldn’t make it—she had health issues of her own, and three other children to care for. But he’d gone to his dance and proudly showed her his middle school class ring.

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Disruptive Innovation to Improve Care

Dec 22, 2014, 2:58 PM, Posted by Rebekah Gee

Pooja Mehta, MD, is a generalist obstetrician/gynecologist and a second-year Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Clinical Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania, with support from the Department of Veterans Affairs. Rebekah Gee, MD, MHS, is Medicaid Medical Director for the state of Louisiana, an assistant professor of health policy and management, and obstetrics and gynecology at Louisiana State University and an alumna of the RWJF Clinical Scholars program.*

Pooja Mehta Pooja Mehta

The theory of disruptive innovation seeks to explain how complicated, expensive systems may eventually be replaced by simpler, more affordable solutions, driven by new entrants into a market who “disrupt” an older, less efficient, and less accessible order.

In the new issue of Current Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology, we track the history of the RWJF Clinical Scholars program (CSP) in the field of obstetrics and gynecology, and offer a curated selection of pieces that suggest that our discipline—now peppered with experts in health services research and health policy trained through the CSP—could be teetering at the precipice of an era of such disruptive innovation.  

Highlighting the work of nine current and past scholars, among more than 40 Clinical Scholars working in the field of obstetrics and gynecology, this journal issue covers a range of cutting-edge concepts currently being developed and employed to transform our field from the inside out.

Nathaniel DeNicola, MD, (‘11) discusses the potential uses of social media to disseminate and advance new findings and recommendations to broader audiences. Laurie Zephyrin, MD, MBA, (’03) illuminates how efforts to integrate systems, create interdisciplinary initiatives, and how research-clinical partnerships have allowed for rapid organizational and cultural change and have advanced reproductive health care in the Veterans Affairs system.

Elizabeth Krans, MD, (‘09) writes about ways in which new public funding is allowing for disruptive innovation in the delivery of prenatal care—for example, through dissemination of the highly decentralized, patient-driven Centering Pregnancy model. Working from within a city health department, Erin Saleeby, MD, (‘10) writes about how participatory approaches to public health governance can engage community and clinician leaders in the process of redesigning reproductive care and transforming outcomes.

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The Front Line of Medicine

Dec 18, 2014, 9:00 AM

For the 25th anniversary of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s (RWJF) Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP), the Human Capital Blog is publishing scholar profiles, some reprinted from the program’s website. SMDEP is a six-week academic enrichment program that has created a pathway for more than 22,000 participants, opening the doors to life-changing opportunities. Following is a profile of Juan Jose Ferreris, MD, a member of the Class of 1989.

It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.’

The words of abolitionist Frederick Douglass resonate for Juan Jose Ferreris, a pediatrician and assistant clinical adjunct professor at University of Texas Health Science Center. He sees a straight line between the public funds allocated for children’s care and their well-being as adults.

“Kids receive less than 20 cents of every health care dollar. Meanwhile, 80 percent goes to adult end-of-life care. Why aren’t we spending those funds on people when they’re young, when it could make a genuine difference?”

Ferreris contends that money also shapes health in less obvious ways. Salaries of primary care physicians are well below those of more “glamorous” specialists. Some fledgling MDs, burdened with medical school debt, reason that they can’t afford not to specialize. Consequently, he says, only 3 percent of medical students choose primary care.

For Ferreris, who is both humbled and inspired by his young patients, building a Culture of Health necessitates recalibrating priorities.

“Nobody’s concentrating on the whole; they’re only looking at one part. And they’re not paying attention to the human—the brain, the spirit, the soul.

“We overlook that aspect...but it’s where I believe the primary care doctor has irreplaceable value.”

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How Cataract Surgery Helped Me See the Future of Health Transparency

Dec 12, 2014, 1:34 PM, Posted by Risa Lavizzo-Mourey

Robotic Surgery

More and more health care costs are shifted to consumers. So why, asks RWJF President and CEO Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, can’t we easily discover and compare health care costs and quality?

Here’s how the subject came up. Recently, Lavizzo-Mourey underwent cataract surgery at an outpatient center in Philadelphia. No matter whom she talked to—and she was shunted from one person to the next—she could not learn the all-in cost of the procedure.

Lavizzo-Mourey finally did manage to find out the cost of her surgery: $2,000, including co-pays and deductible. But the whole episode, she says, is illustrative of a larger problem.

Writing in a recent blog post on the professional social networking site LinkedIn, Lavizzo-Mourey asks: “Could there be a clearer example of the lack of transparency in the U.S. health care system?”

To get the information we need, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is funding a set of studies to help us better understand how greater price transparency influences consumer and provider decisions. “And in March,” Lavizzo-Mourey adds, “we will host a summit on transparency that will attempt to come up with more answers."

Along those lines, RWJF last year issued a challenge to developers to devise consumer-friendly tools to parse the abundant hospital price data released by Medicare. The winner? Consumer Reports, for the Consumer Reports Hospital Adviser: Hip & Knee, a personalized app for health care consumers seeking the best hospital for hip or knee replacement surgery.

You can help us move the cost and quality needle forward. Do you know of any other price/quality apps or tools? Let us know.