Now Viewing: Pediatric care

Bedtime Story

Jul 1, 2014, 10:33 AM, Posted by Jeff Meade

Sarah Meade Reading Pic Sarah, having a read at Granny's house

The globby tears, the quavering voice, the pudgy outstretched hands, the plaintive word “please.” They all come to mind as vividly as if it were yesterday.

Our daughter Sarah was (and still is, at 27) a good soul, but like every small child, she had her moments. And when those “moments” more or less coincided with bedtime, the worst punishment we could mete out was to refuse to read her bedtime stories—or “sturries,” as she called them. We would kiss her good night, and adjourn to the living room, there to sit and look at each other guiltily as our little girl suffered the tortures of the damned.

We listened to that heartbreaking little plea, “But I HAVE to have sturries!” echoing down the hall, and our hearts would break, too. We felt like the worst parents ever

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The Ripple Effect of Asthma Programming

Nov 1, 2013, 2:58 PM, Posted by Molly McKaughan

There was once a small boy. He was 5 years old, and he lived in a neighborhood of Washington, D.C., in an environment that was rife with potential triggers for asthma.

Back in 2006, we wrote about this boy in a report assessing the impact of one of our programs, Managing Pediatric Asthma.

JH, as we called him then, was enrolled in that program. And with good reason. He coughed and wheezed four days out of every seven, and had made four visits to the emergency department at Children’s National Medical Center in the previous year.

It’s been a long time since I’d thought about JH, but his compelling story came flooding back to me when I read a recent story in the Washington Post about an asthma clinic at this same hospital.  It teaches families of kids with asthma, kids like JH, how to manage the condition with medication, ultimately reducing the number of trips to the emergency room.

According to the Post article, “The clinic has had some success. ER visit rates for asthma have fallen by 40 percent, even as the prevalence of asthma continues to rise.”

Those hopeful results reminded me of JH and other kids just like him, and of RWJF’s important investment in pediatric asthma. The story demonstrates how one program can have such a ripple effect—making a big difference, not only in the life of one very small boy years ago, but in the lives of children with asthma living in Washington today.

 

Ranking the Healthiest Counties for Kids

Jun 13, 2013, 4:43 PM, Posted by Joe Marx

Healthy Eating at School

Let’s say you’re moving your family to a new community.  Could be a job opportunity or life change.  When it comes to health, should you be thinking about the quality of hospital care for your kids?  Or, whether the community you’re going to is a healthy place for kids to grow up and thrive?

Well, both matter, but until recently, the things that lead to better health—and perhaps keep kids from going to the hospital in the first place—have received less attention.  But we are beginning to see a dynamic shift from emphasis on sick care to prevention and wellness.  A good example is this week’s US News & World Report ranking of “America’s 50 Healthiest Counties for Kids”. These are the folks who give us report cards on colleges, hospitals and best places to retire. Released as part of their “Best Children’s Hospitals” annual report, the article emphasizes important factors that lead to better health, or not, in the places where we live and raise our families. Things like how many kids are living in poverty, teen birth rates, infant deaths and injuries.

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