Now Viewing: Nutrition

Cutting Calories: Good for Health, Good for Business

Sep 16, 2014, 12:58 PM, Posted by RWJF Blog Team

90307108

Four years ago, 16 companies, acting together as part of the Healthy Weight Commitment Foundation (HWCF), announced an ambitious pledge—to remove 1.5 trillion calories from the U.S. marketplace by 2015. They wanted to help reduce obesity in America, especially childhood obesity. Research published today in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine confirms that the companies far exceeded their pledge, and are making a difference that’s helping families buy fewer calories.

Collectively, these companies sold 6.4 trillion fewer calories in 2012 than they did in 2007, which we announced in early 2014. What’s new in these studies tells us that, during that same pledge period, families with children bought fewer calories from packaged foods and beverages—and the biggest cuts were from major sources of excess calories in kids’ diets, such as sweets, snacks, and soft drinks.

Why is this pledge so important, and what’s the next step for industry leaders who want to help reverse the childhood obesity epidemic? RWJF senior vice president Jim Marks and lead study author Barry Popkin, PhD, of the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, share their views.

View full post

Promoting A “Green” Culture of Health: Instead of Wasting Food, Getting it to Those Who Need It

Jun 25, 2014, 3:54 PM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

Mercer Street Friends Food Bank Warehouse Trenton

“A mind is a terrible thing to waste,” goes an old slogan of the United Negro College Fund. Another terrible thing to waste is healthy food.

That’s especially true in a nation where 1 in 7 U.S. households are “food insecure”—that is, they lack consistent, dependable access, typically for financial reasons, to “enough food for active, healthy living,” as a U.S. Department of Agriculture report puts it. About 1 in 10 U.S. households have food-insecure children—an equally appalling reality in a country that wastes an estimated 30 to 40 percent of its food supply, or a whopping 133 billion pounds of food in 2010 alone.

In California’s Orange County, however, a solution is at hand—and there’s no reason it couldn’t take hold and spread nationwide. Since 2012, the Waste Not Orange County Coalition, a public-private partnership, has worked to boost donations to local food pantries of surplus healthy food from local restaurants, grocery stores and other facilities. The organization was formed out of the realization that enough food was tossed out every day to feed the nearly 380,000 local residents—almost half of them children—who are deemed food insecure.

View full post

Simple, Small Changes Can Lead to Healthier Food Choices

Jan 21, 2014, 11:20 AM, Posted by Deborah Bae

Culture of Health Blog Post Framed Traffic Light

At this time of year, many of us find ourselves trying hard to stick to that New Year’s resolution to eat healthier. Here is some good news: simple changes in our environment can have meaningful, sustained effects on our ability to make healthy food choices.

Committing to a healthier diet and trying to lose weight is hard, and many people believe they can do it as long as they have the right motivation and attitude. We’ll say things like, “I’m going to eat better” or “I’m going to eat fewer unhealthy foods.” But that commitment can be tough when people face a variety of unhealthy choices and just a few healthy ones. Or when it’s hard to tell which is which.

Researcher and physician Anne Thorndike and her colleagues at Massachusetts General Hospital tested a novel idea: if all healthy food and drinks sold in the hospital cafeteria were labeled green, and all unhealthy items had red labels, would people make healthier choices?

View full post

A New Holiday Tradition—Tasty Recipes that are Healthy, Too

Nov 26, 2013, 5:01 PM, Posted by Catherine Arnst

file

Thanksgiving is almost upon us, ushering in a month-long season of holiday parties, groaning boards of food, favorite family recipes, cookie swaps, and an extra five pounds around the waistline. Instead of just giving in to the excess and making January the month of dieting, perhaps we could make a few adjustments. I’ve asked around the Foundation staff for some healthy holiday recipes instead of the usual green bean casserole and cream-laden sides. Here are some tried and true alternatives, that are kid–friendly as well!

In fact, why not invite any children about the house (or adults who are still kids at heart) to help whip up some of these dishes. Children love to grate, stir, and shake, and the older ones will go at chopping with a vengeance. It’s never too early to teach them to cook, as discussed on this blog a few days ago.

View full post

Get Out of the Drive-Thru Lane. Learn to Cook!

Nov 22, 2013, 1:32 PM, Posted by Catherine Arnst

060920_Tully_RWJF_ICIC_559_HIRES

Some statistics worth pondering: According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average American spends only 33 minutes a day on food preparation. Just over half of Americans bother to cook every day. On the other hand, 33 percent of children and 41 percent of teenagers eat fast food, every single day.

These fast food children are consuming 126 additional calories, and the teens 310 extra calories, than if they had avoided the chains, says Fast Food Facts 2013, a new report by the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity and funded by RWJF. Most of these children are eating adult meals, too, not the smaller-portioned children’s meals on offer. Not that it would matter, since less than one percent of all kids’ meal served at fast food chains meet recommended nutrition standards.

It’s not much of a stretch to link the lack of home cooking, a diet of fast food, and the fact that a third of U.S. children and adolescents are obese. So, what’s a parent to do? Well for one thing, we could learn to cook.

View full post

How We're Furthering the Culture of Health This Summer

Jun 19, 2013, 3:28 PM, Posted by Anna Heling

Strawberry Picking RWJF Program Officer Jasmine Hall Ratliff said a trip to the strawberry patch was a great way to show her 3-year-old daughter where food comes from.

Promoting a “culture of health” isn’t just a 9-to-5 job for RWJF employees; many of them also use their time out of the office to further their push toward health and well-being. As Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, president and CEO, describes it, creating a culture of health means having “the kind of values where we can say health, and the policies and practices that go into making sure we are a healthy community, are as much a part of us as are the values that say we pursue life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” Here, in the first in a series, members of the RWJF crew talk about how they’re furthering this healthy mindset throughout the summer months.

BEING A HEALTHY ROLE MODEL: Jasmine Hall Ratliff (Program Officer for the Childhood Obesity team)

After losing her mother to cancer at a young age, Hall Ratliff grew up with a single father who instilled in her the importance of healthy living: he used the office gym, cooked at home and encouraged the kids to participate in sports. Now, as a relatively new mom herself, Hall Ratliff is working to foster that same culture of health in her 3-year-old daughter Beverly. She said the family’s garden on the balcony and trips to the local strawberry patch help demonstrate where food comes from and the importance of local produce. For Hall Ratliff, losing her mother to cancer and her dad’s subsequent healthy role modeling reinforced the importance of creating a culture of health. “Losing my mother to cancer at a young age makes me value my own health and do all I can to prevent the diseases that I can prevent. It’s important to me, and I want my daughter to understand healthy living.”

BIKING UP THE COAST OF CONNECTICUT: Robin Hogen (Vice President, Communications)

For the second year in a row, Hogen will bike the 100-mile route from Stamford to Essex to benefit the Connecticut Veterans Legal Center, an organization that provides free legal assistance to veterans recovering from homelessness and mental illness. The cycling enthusiast heard about the Legal Center from a friend and said pushing the pedals is a healthy way to raise money for a cause that’s important to him. He’s prepping for the ride by cycling a few times a week, as well as keeping active through running and sailing. As for the ride, he said it’s all about the exercise—and the organization: “You have to remind yourself that it’s not a race; it’s about finishing. Not finishing first…just finishing.”

GIVING BEES A HOME: Sherry DeMarchi (Communications Specialist)

The animal lover and her husband are prepping their yard for a new type of creature: bees. DeMarchi said she recently learned that the number of wild bee colonies is dwindling fast, which research shows will have an effect on the availability of fruits and vegetables (they pollinate many agricultural crops). “Because of the high use of insecticides and pesticides and habitat loss, we’re seeing this dramatic decrease in the abundance of these bees,” DeMarchi said. “Although it doesn’t involve a lot of physical activity, we feel that we’re contributing toward the culture of health by working toward keeping these important little beings in the ecosystem so they can pollinate…and everybody can eat.” DeMarchi’s prepping her yard for the thousands of visitors, building the hives in an old fort of her son’s and visiting friends who’ve “housed” bees themselves to get some tips.