Now Viewing: Barriers to care: cultural, gender and racial

Diversity Is a Window: It Lets Light In and Out

Aug 15, 2013, 5:17 PM, Posted by Culture of Health Blog Team

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When patients carry racist attitudes into the health care setting along with their illnesses and injuries, how should nurses and other providers of color respond?

While some patient attitudes can be insulting, to say the very least, Angela Amar, PhD, RN, FAAN, says such a patient encounter can also provide a learning opportunity.

In a post on RWJF's Human Capital blog, Amar recalls a particularly challenging incident when she was a new nurse. "I had just entered a patient’s room when he called out from the bathroom to ask his wife who was there," Amar writes. "She replied, 'it’s a lil’ colored girl to see you.'”

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U.S. Women: Many Missing From the Picture of Health

Jun 4, 2013, 4:21 PM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

Susan Dentzer Susan Dentzer

The missing women. The concept was first put forward by Nobel Prize-winning economist Amartya Sen in the 1980s. He pointed to demographic evidence that hundreds of millions of women were simply missing from the planet—most likely never having been born, or died, due to discrimination or neglect.

Biologically, females are stronger than males; as a result, in much of the world women outnumber men in population sex ratios. But Sen found the ratio was flipped in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Subsequent investigations show a similar pattern in other parts of the world where women are at substantial economic and social disadvantage to men—including other countries in Asia, the Middle East, North Africa, and central and Eastern Europe.

Now, research sponsored in part by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation raises the question: Is there a growing corps of “missing women” in the United States as well?

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