Now Viewing: Social determinants of health

Why Empathy is Essential to a Culture of Health

Apr 11, 2014, 11:34 AM, Posted by Tara Oakman

Peace activist Zak Ebrahim speaks at TED 2014

Everyone knows it is hard to get 2-year-olds to do anything on a schedule. They want to do everything their way, on their own time. As you can imagine, trying to get my twins out the door each morning—let alone take a bath or eat a meal, can be quite a challenge. After trying a number of different parenting methods, I have discovered that the one way I can usually motivate them is to talk about feelings, and get them to recognize how their actions affect their sibling. Just yesterday, the only way I could get my son out of the bath was by telling him that his sister was sad and lonely waiting for him. And then, and only then, did he move.

Building empathy has been a critical strategy in my household of late—not only because it helps motivate them, but also because it is an important part of their social development. Lately I have been thinking about empathy on a larger scale, beyond my household, and how critical it is to building a Culture of Health.

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Making a Collective Impact in the Lives of Young Men of Color

Apr 2, 2014, 9:15 AM, Posted by Maisha Simmons

Hispanic, Iraqi and African American male students

On a bone-chilling cold day in Chicago last fall, I went on a site visit for a pending grantee. The grantee's office was warm and cozy, tucked away in a neighborhood with a bustling corridor of small businesses that sold a variety of ethnic foods and baked goods. The office walls told the stories of the neighborhood through brightly colored murals depicting loving families and happy children, on a backdrop of a beautiful Chicago landscape.

During this site visit I met a young man named Jose who captivated the room with his story. Jose loved art, even though his school had no art program. Art was the one way that he could express his love, fear, joy and pain. The art poured out of him—on his notebooks and books, and eventually on the walls and fences of his community. Luckily, a relative recognized Jose’s talent and found a community art program where he could learn his craft and express himself on canvases and murals instead of on buildings and public property.

A few months later, Jose was called into his principal’s office and threatened with suspension. Teachers and staff suspected that Jose was to blame for recent vandalism on school property. Shocked and nervous, Jose tried to explain that his art program had given him an outlet and that he no longer drew on desks or walls. But he had no proof and was suspended.

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Bridging Health and Health Care: Confessions of an "Upstreamist"

Mar 20, 2014, 8:40 AM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

The Upstream Doctors

A key aspect of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s new “culture of health” focus is “bridging” the two worlds of population health and health care. One component of that bridge—arguably, its abutment—rests in the nation’s more than 100 academic health centers (AHC’s).

These schools of health and medical professional education, linked with owned or affiliated teaching hospitals and health systems, have long concentrated on the invention and provision of intensive, costly, and high-tech medicine. But now some of these centers are also building bridges upstream—focusing on incomes, housing, transportation, and other social forces that are the primary drivers of health.

Leaders in this movement recently convened at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., for the third national conference of Academic Health Centers and the Social Determinants of Health.

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We Are All in This Together

Feb 11, 2014, 4:41 PM, Posted by Risa Lavizzo-Mourey

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Building a culture of health means recognizing that while Americans’ economic, geographic, or social circumstances may differ, we all aspire to lead the best lives that we can.

For the Foundation, it also means working hand-in-hand with all Americans to inform the dialogue and build demand for health by pursuing new partnerships, create new networks to build momentum, and stand on the shoulders of others striving to make America a healthier nation.

Learn more in our President’s Message
Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, is president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

 

 

Investing in Children to Improve the Nation's Health

Jan 27, 2014, 6:28 PM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

RWJF recently convened a panel of distinguished guests for a Google+ Hangout to examine targeted interventions that could help America’s youngest children live healthier, happier, and safer lives. Here's an archived version of the Hangout.

"It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men," wrote Frederick Douglass, the 19th century African-American social reformer, writer and orator. A century and a half later, to improve the health of Americans, it's essential to start with kids.

That’s a preeminent conclusion of the new report of the RWJF Commission to Build a Healthier America called Time to Act: Investing in the Health of Our Children and Communities. The report focuses on ways to influence the upstream determinants of Americans' generally poor health, including low levels of education and incomes, unsafe environments, and non-nutritious food. Of the panel's three top recommendations, the first is distinctly child-centric: "Invest in the foundations of lifelong physical and mental well-being of our youngest children." Were he alive today, Douglass would surely agree.

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Communities Need More Ladders, Fewer Chutes

Nov 8, 2013, 1:33 PM, Posted by Katie Loovis

GSK IMPACT Grants GlaxoSmithKline supports some urban redevelopment projects because they lead to healthier communities—this piece of artwork, for example, inspires community members to bike around town. (Photo: GSK)

Katie Loovis is director of U.S. community partnerships and stakeholder engagement for GlaxoSmithKline, the global health care company. In this role, Katie is responsible for providing leadership and shaping strategy for GSK’s U.S. community engagement and philanthropic activities at the national, state, and local levels, and building relationships.

Chutes and Ladders—one of the greatest board games in human history—is a game of rewards and consequences. You make a move and are met with a benefit (ladder to a higher level) or a detriment (chute to a lower level). All the while, you’re aiming for the top, journeying toward the blue ribbon finish.

Living a long and healthy life is kind of like a game of chutes and ladders. You might go along thinking that by visiting your doctor every year (ladder) and choosing to nosh on lots of veggies (ladder) that you are on-track, but ... sorry! Your neighborhood lacks a grocery store stocked with healthy foods (chute), it doesn’t have any safe parks or green spaces to exercise (chute), you live in a house full of smokers (chute); and to top it all off, you just lost your job in this tough economy (chute !).

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After Trayvon, 10 Reasons for Hope

Jul 17, 2013, 2:52 PM, Posted by Maisha Simmons

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This past Sunday afternoon—the day after the Zimmerman verdict was announced—I stood in a crowd of people from all ethnicities and nationalities, babies and old folk, with people who looked like their address could be Park Avenue or a park bench. We all converged on Union Square in New York City in 100-degree heat to demonstrate our unity, chanting “Justice for Trayvon!”

In the midst of this peaceful protest, I could not stop thinking about a different event about to take place this week here at the Foundation and around the nation.

On Wednesday, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) announced that it will invest approximately $5 million to support 10 initiatives around the country to improve the health of young men of color and improve their chances for success. The grants are part of RWJF’s $9.5 million Forward Promise initiative, started in 2011, and my colleagues and I have been preparing for this moment for months and months. It is one of the most exciting times in my career.

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African Americans' Lives Today: Reflections from an RWJF Investigator

Jun 11, 2013, 4:12 PM, Posted by Ari Kramer

jamesjackson

Recently, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Harvard School of Public Health and National Public Radio conducted a national survey which provides a snapshot of African-Americans’ views on a range of issues in their personal lives and communities, including and beyond health and health care. A majority of respondents reported being overall satisfied with their lives and communities. At the same time, many reported concerns about their economic stability and resources to pay for a major illness, and experiences of discrimination.

To get some historical perspective and insights into how the findings relate to existing research, we spoke with James S. Jackson, Ph.D., professor at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, and director of its Institute for Social Research. For more than 40 years, Jackson has been studying the racial and ethnic influences on American personal, social and community life, and growing heterogeneity of the nation’s Black population. Also a RWJF Investigator in Health Policy Research, he is currently directing extensive surveys on the social and political behavior and mental and physical health of the African American and Black Caribbean populations.

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