Now Viewing: Health care delivery system

Doing More Means Doing Less: Young Innovators Lead the Charge

Jul 23, 2014, 1:28 PM, Posted by Emmy Ganos

CAP_84483_10

Here at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, we often talk about the idea of making the healthy choice the easy choice. To many of us, that means putting the cookies in a high cabinet, and putting the fruit on the counter. But when I think about building a Culture of Health in America, and especially within our health care system, making the healthy choice the easy choice means so much more.

In health care, often the healthy choice actually means doing less—fewer invasive tests and less dependence on medication—and instead watchfully waiting or making healthy lifestyle changes. But it’s not always easy to show a patient that you care when you only have a few minutes to spend together, and ordering a test or prescribing a medication is a simple way to show “I’m doing something to help you.” The trouble is, those tests, procedures and treatments often don't help, and sometimes they can hurt.

View Full Post

Bridging Health and Health Care: Confessions of an "Upstreamist"

Mar 20, 2014, 8:40 AM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

The Upstream Doctors

A key aspect of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s new “culture of health” focus is “bridging” the two worlds of population health and health care. One component of that bridge—arguably, its abutment—rests in the nation’s more than 100 academic health centers (AHC’s).

These schools of health and medical professional education, linked with owned or affiliated teaching hospitals and health systems, have long concentrated on the invention and provision of intensive, costly, and high-tech medicine. But now some of these centers are also building bridges upstream—focusing on incomes, housing, transportation, and other social forces that are the primary drivers of health.

Leaders in this movement recently convened at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., for the third national conference of Academic Health Centers and the Social Determinants of Health.

View Full Post

We Are All in This Together

Feb 11, 2014, 4:41 PM, Posted by Risa Lavizzo-Mourey

presidents_message_billboard_v0.1

Building a culture of health means recognizing that while Americans’ economic, geographic, or social circumstances may differ, we all aspire to lead the best lives that we can.

For the Foundation, it also means working hand-in-hand with all Americans to inform the dialogue and build demand for health by pursuing new partnerships, create new networks to build momentum, and stand on the shoulders of others striving to make America a healthier nation.

Learn more in our President’s Message
Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, is president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

 

 

And the Winner is … Streetlights, for Applying Big Data to Community Health

Jan 15, 2014, 12:41 PM, Posted by Paul Tarini

Cropped Streetlight project

Big data, the buzzword of choice these days in information technology, holds the promise of transforming health care as programmers and policy-makers figure out how to mine trillions of ones and zeros for information about the best (and worst) health practices, disease and lifestyle trends, interconnections, and insights. The problem is, where to start? To jump start the process, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation joined in a Knight News Challenge: Health and issued its own call to developers to come up with innovative ways to combine public health and health care data, with a $50,000 prize to the best idea.

The results are in. When the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation announced the winners of its News Challenge for ideas focused on unlocking the power of health data on January 15—you can see the list here—we also announced the winner of our companion prize for the best entries who combined public health data with data from health care to improve the health of communities. Our first place winner is the Streetlights Project from Chicago.

View Full Post

Knight Foundation News Challenge: Looking for a Few Great Data-Leveraging Ideas

Sep 9, 2013, 11:59 AM, Posted by Culture of Health Blog Team

11_06_30_HealthFair_RWJF_4_5093

On August 19, we announced a new $100,000 prize as part of the Knight Foundation’s latest News Challenge, which seeks innovative ideas to harness information and data for the health of communities. The RWJF award is for those entrants who combine public health data with other types of population data to improve the health of communities. The Knight Foundation has committed $2 million to the contest as well.

The entries phase opened this week, and, as of this writing, 34 entries have already been submitted! We asked Paul Tarini, senior program officer for the Pioneer Portfolio, and Anne Weiss, senior program officer and team director of the Quality/Equality team, to reflect on the 105 ideas shared during the initial inspiration phase:

Paul commented:

“I liked the idea about linking health and housing data to improve the provision of social services, health services and housing support to people who are homeless. I also liked the vision for CHEER from Miami-Dade County, which is trying to link kids’ education and health data to improve outcomes for children and inform policy. Similarly comes an idea from Virginia to link datasets from the Health Department on birth issues, early childhood health conditions, and maternal health conditions to social service data and educational outcomes.

My question to everyone who submitted ideas during the inspiration phase: Can you actually get the data you’re interested in using? And, how will you make the data actionable?”

Anne adds:

“I have to say that a lot of what I saw wasn’t exactly what I expected. I saw apps and technology that used ONE source of data. There were a number that did combine data, but I couldn’t get a very specific sense of what data they’d combined and how it would be used.

The ones that excited me, if I read them right, were the ones about combining data on grocery store purchasing with primary care data, as well as the idea related to Trenton public transit.These seemed to me to be fresh, to address social determinants of health, and to leverage the power of different types of data. What I especially liked about these is that they have some interested, committed partners at the table who want the project to succeed, and they’ve got at least an early notion of specifics—what they will do and how they’ll do it.”

Be sure to keep an eye on the Knight News Challenge page to see the ideas being submitted—and if YOU have a bright idea you’d like to submit, be sure to do it soon. The challenge closes on Sept. 17; that’s just 11 days away!

Move Over, Richard Kiley. Here’s Why We Want to Combine Public Health Data with Health Care Data

Aug 19, 2013, 9:00 AM, Posted by Paul Tarini

Calit2

We’re announcing today a new $100,000 prize as part of the Knight Foundation’s latest News Challenge, which seeks innovative ideas to harness information and data for the health of communities. The RWJF award is for those entrants who combine public health data with data from health care to improve the health of communities. The Knight Foundation itself has committed $2 million to the contest, as well.

The reason we want to combine public health data with health care data is because of the potential the combined data has to drive real improvements and innovation. When we were discussing this, one of my colleagues broke out with “To dream the impossible dream.” While he couldn’t match Kiley’s sonorous baritone, he did capture the ambition in the song.

View Full Post

Low-Cost, High-Quality Health Care: Not Made in the USA?

Jun 13, 2013, 3:22 PM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

Susan Dentzer

Imagine that you’re a heart patient. You go to the hospital for open heart surgery and recover successfully. As you leave for home, you’re handed a bill for the surgery and hospital stay—for $800.

In the high-priced world of U.S. health care, where charges for such procedures typically run into the six figures, that price is practically unthinkable. That’s why the idea of $800 heart surgery comes all the way from India—and why the largest nonprofit health and hospital system in the U.S.,  Ascension Health, wants to figure out how it might be replicated within its walls.

Americans are accustomed to thinking that the best ideas are hatched here and then exported abroad. But in health care, it’s clear that we have plenty to learn from other countries,  especially from efforts to provide care in low-resource settings, such as in much of Africa, Asia and Latin America. 

View Full Post