Now Viewing: Education and training

Expanding Horizons for Rural Young Men of Color

Sep 8, 2014, 1:55 PM, Posted by Maisha Simmons

Forward Promise - Oakland

When we first began the Forward Promise initiative, we envisioned building the capacity and impact of organizations across the country working with boys and young men of color from every type of community and background. We wanted to identify and support a cohort of grantees that were diverse in their approach, in their geography, and in the racial, ethnic and cultural experiences of the young people that they supported. Once we began doing this work, it didn’t take long to realize we were falling short.

The simple truth is that the majority of organizations who applied for Forward Promise that had demonstrated success and were ready to expand were located in major cities. Few applicants were in the rural beltway that stretches across the Southern United States, from Alabama to Arizona. It would be easy to assume that there weren’t many young men of color there or that there was not much innovation or capacity to support young men of color in that region. But you know what they say about assumptions ...

View full post

#LATISM, a Culture of Health Experiment

Sep 26, 2013, 8:19 PM, Posted by Christine Nieves

Group shot with Christine Nieves

Latinos in Tech and Social Media, better known as LATISM, is a movement that I had heard about, but not yet experienced. That all changed on Sept. 21 and 22, when I joined hundreds and hundreds of Latinos from around the nation at the Waldorf Astoria in Manhattan for the 5th annual LATISM conference. The focus: business, health, tech, education and advocacy.

For me, it all started six months ago. Andres Henriquez from the National Science Foundation, Rob Torres from the Gates Foundation, and I had a fortuitous encounter in Washington, D.C., as members of the Aprendiendo Juntos "Learning Together" Council. Aprendiendo Juntos Council is a multi-sector group of researchers, practitioners, and policy experts who seek to identify new models and practical strategies to improve educational outcomes for Hispanic-Latino families through the wise deployment of digital technologies. After sharing our concern for underrepresentation of high-quality Latino candidates for philanthropic funding in our respective organizations, we concluded that we wanted to demystify philanthropy. So we embarked on an experiment. What if we could talk about our trajectory–from hardship to philanthropy–with an audience of digital movers and shakers?

And that’s what we did over the September weekend. It was an engaging conversation with Latinos–working in technology, business, education and advocacy–who are ultimately committed to making their communities healthier and stronger. This conversation is just the beginning, and a great way to test my pet-hypothesis: That we will find the opportunity to share a Culture of Health in the places we least expect to find it.

What do you think? Please share your comments and ideas with me here and via Twitter @nieveschristine.

What Would Melanie Do?

Jun 25, 2013, 11:20 AM, Posted by Beth Toner

 A critical response medical team walking in a hospital corridor.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has long been committed to the improvement of nursing education—and to supporting academic progression in nursing. While nursing shortages may wax and wane, it’s clear that the baby boomers will need high-quality nursing care as they move into later life. Meanwhile, nursing schools turn away more than 75,000 qualified applicants each year.

In short, really good nurse educators have never been more necessary, yet they are increasingly in short supply. Last week, we lost one of the best I’ve ever known.

I heard about Melanie’s death, sadly, the way we sometimes do when we’ve lost touch with people—via a community college classmate on social media. Melanie had learned she had pancreatic cancer in January—and given a grim prognosis; in the end, she lived less than five months after diagnosis, dying far too young—at the age of 58. In the first awful moment, I felt a crush of regret that I’d learned of her death this way. And then I found myself smiling, thinking of when I’d first met Melanie on a warm August night in 2008—squeezed into a stuffy and cramped classroom with 31 other people in a room better suited for 15.

We were, all of us, first-year nursing students on our very first day of nursing school. We were, in many respects, a motley crew—ranging in age from our early 20s to our early 60s (I was somewhere in the middle). Stay-at-home moms rejoining the paid workforce, retired Army medics, and second-career students (like me) all shared one emotion that evening: fear. How would we manage full-time day jobs and evening/weekend classes and clinicals? From studying material that was completely foreign to me—with what felt (at the time) like a worthless master’s degree in journalism—to learning tasks that seemed incredibly complicated (how could I stick a needle in another human being?), I didn’t feel up to the task ahead. What the heck had I been thinking? Me? A nurse?

Melanie gave us an overview of the semester ahead. She calmly answered each agonized question we asked her. As she wrapped up her remarks, she smiled at her nervous charges and said, “I know you feel overwhelmed right now, and you feel like there’s so much to do. I’ll just remind you that you can do this the same way you’d eat an elephant: one piece at a time.”

It was exactly the right thing to say at exactly the right time. Melanie would repeat those words to me—often just saying “one piece at a time”—when she saw me in the hallway, agonizing over a clinical skill I hadn’t mastered or a lab value I couldn’t remember, more times than I can remember. I would often come to class exhausted and near tears from a grim day in corporate America, but Melanie would, with her real-life stories of patients to illustrate that night’s lecture, remind me why I had decided to become a nurse in the first place. We knew her for her pithy summary of the most obvious fact (“smoking is baaaaaaaaaaaaad!” she would say in a near-hiss), but also for her fierce love of, and advocacy for, each and every patient.

I made it through nursing school, passed the NCLEX, and thought of Melanie as I worked weekends in long-term care. If my patient had been Melanie’s mom, what would she have wanted me to do for her? When I felt as if I couldn’t make it through my first night shift alone, I remembered Melanie’s words of advice on that first day.

I thought of her again last week, and realized what a loss the world of nursing education suffered with her passing. It’s not only important to support our nurse educators—and to encourage others to join their ranks—but to thank them for sharing their love of nursing and their patients with us. I never got to say a proper “thanks” to Melanie. But you can bet that I’ll remind each nursing student I see that she (or he) can get there, one piece at a time.