Now Viewing: Health Data and IT

Data4Health: Live from San Francisco

Nov 20, 2014, 3:47 PM, Posted by Culture of Health Blog Team

San Francisco Golden Gate and City View

Join us online to hear from leading national experts on how we can use data to build a Culture of Health.

DATE: Thursday, December 4
TIME: 12 p.m.—1:30 p.m. ET/9 a.m.–10:30 a.m. PT

VIEWING INSTRUCTIONS: The event will be broadcast on this blog post.  Please save this link to watch the event.

SPEAKERS:

  • Karen DeSalvo, acting assistant secretary for health, US Department of Health and Human Services
  • Andrew Rosenthal, group manager for platform + wellness, Jawbone
  • Gary Wolf, co-founder, Quantified Self Movement
  • Roni Zeiger, CEO, Smart Patients

Register for the webcast

Blog post by Ivor Horn, MD, Advisory Committee Co-Chair and San Francisco MC

It has truly been a fun experience working with the team at RWJF on the Data for Health Initiative. Since we embarked on this journey at the end of October we have been moving at break neck speed to learn how people throughout the country want to use data to build a Culture of Health. As co-chair of this initiative with Dave Ross, director of the Public Health Informatics Institute, I have had the honor of being a “fly on the wall” during discussions in three amazing cities (Philadelphia, Phoenix, and Des Moines). Each session started with insights from local leaders actively engaged in using data to better understand the communities and populations that they serve. But the power of the meetings has really been the content of the Q&A sessions after the talks. This is when people in the room–the folks with “boots on the ground”–give their input.  

 

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Putting the People in Data

Nov 18, 2014, 8:00 AM, Posted by Matthew Trujillo

Data for Health Phoenix Photo

I recently had the privilege of attending the Data for Health listening sessions in Phoenix and Des Moines, initiatives that explore how data and information can be used to improve people’s heath. The key lesson I took away: We cannot forget about the human element when we think about health data and technology.

I have to be honest and admit that I attended these sessions with some admittedly naïve expectations. I half expected that the Des Moines airport would be in the middle of a corn field and that the conversation in the two sessions would focus on the technical side of health data – with people using terms like interoperability and de-identification. But I quickly learned that Des Moines is a flourishing city full of great running paths and people who are passionate about health data. The conversations in both cities actually focused not on the technical side of health data but rather on the human side.

While health data and technology are complex, the complexity of the the individuals and communities who generate and use them are far greater. At first glance, this human complexity may seem like the source of many health data problems but, as pointed out by the session attendees, it is actually the source of many health data solutions:

 

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Data for Health: Learning What Works for Philadelphia

Nov 5, 2014, 12:37 PM, Posted by Susannah Fox

Philadelphia City Hall

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Data for Health—Coming to a Town Near You

Oct 16, 2014, 6:00 AM, Posted by Mike Painter

Listen Image by Ky Olsen (CCBY)

We have some questions for you—questions, that is, about health information. What is it?  Can you get it when you need it? What if your community needed important information to make your town or city safe or keep it healthy? How about information about your health care? Can your doctors and nurses get health care information about you or your family members when they need it quickly?

I came across a recent Wall Street Journal article about a remarkable story of health, resilience and survival in the face of an unimaginable health crisis—a Liberian community facing the advancing Ebola infections in their country got health information and used it to protect themselves. When the community first learned of the rapidly advancing Ebola cases coming toward them, the leaders in that Firestone company town in Liberia jumped on the Internet and performed a Google search for “Ebola”. From that Internet search they learned how to protect themselves. Then those brave people acted on that new information—that new knowledge. They did a number of things like use the information to build quarantine and care facilities as well as map the advancing illness cases in their town—so they could be smart about identifying, quarantining and caring for those infected with the virus—and then stop it. Months later, this town is now essentially a lone bright spot of health in a country devastated by death and illness. Why?  Because the leaders of that town used technology to get the critical health information they needed, and then they used it to act.

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Reflecting on the Great Challenges at TEDMED

Oct 6, 2014, 11:19 AM, Posted by Paul Tarini

TEDMED 2014 photo w/Ramanan Laxminarayan Photo courtesy of TEDMED

Here at RWJF, we are working to build a Culture of Health for all. This is an audacious goal, and one that we clearly cannot accomplish alone. We need to collaborate with thinkers and tinkerers and doers from all sectors–which is why we sponsored TEDMED’s exploration of the Great Challenges of Health and Medicine at its 2014 events.

Specifically, RWJF representatives helped facilitate conversations around six Great Challenges: childhood obesity, engaging patients, medical innovation, health care costs, the impact that poverty has on health, and prevention. We spoke with hundreds of people in person and online (Get a glimpse of the conversation here).

We asked three TEDMED speakers from RWJF's network to reflect on their experience at TEDMED and share some of the stimulating ideas they heard. We hope you'll add your ideas in the comments. 

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Bringing in Diverse Perspectives to Build a Culture of Health

Sep 24, 2014, 9:00 AM, Posted by Lori Melichar

Susannah Fox Susannah Fox, RWJF Entrepreneur in Residence

Entrepreneurs start from a place of passion, then work tirelessly to make others see their vision. I'm excited to announce that Susannah Fox will be pushing all of us at the Foundation to behave more like entrepreneurs.

This month, Fox began a new role as the Foundation's next entrepreneur in residence. She was previously an associate director at the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, where she combined traditional survey research with field work in online patient communities. She excels at using data and storytelling to compel policymakers, consumers, and entrepreneurs to understand and discuss key health care issues.

To build a Culture of Health in the United States, we have to consider new approaches and ways of thinking. We need the creativity, imagination, and efforts of people from a range of backgrounds and industries to develop innovative solutions to our most pressing health and health care challenges. A health and technology researcher and trend spotter, Fox will be a valuable asset to these efforts.

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Building the Information-Rich Culture of Health

Aug 20, 2014, 10:36 AM, Posted by Mike Painter, Susan Dentzer

Reform by the Numbers Visual

What if your mother wanted to take some ibuprofen for her arthritis, but didn’t know if it would interact adversely with her other medications?

No problem, right?

She could whip out her smartphone and launch an app that connected to her local health information exchange. Within fractions of a second, the exchange would verify her identity, locate the computer storing her electronic health record (EHR), and shoot an answer back to her.

This scenario is just one example of the many ways that having timely access to health information could contribute to health. It could, that is, if the nation had an agreed-upon way to organize data about health and health care in ways that made it easily accessible and usable while still secure and protected.

But for now, we don’t.

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I'm Happy I Dropped my iPhone in the Pool ...

Jun 29, 2014, 11:23 AM, Posted by Najaf Ahmad

Bye Bye, iPhone

But I wasn't happy at first. While on vacation, I was mortified when I saw “him” lying at the bottom of the pool. “He” was my constant companion through boredom-and caffeine-fueled late-night working sessions.

Snap back to reality. Moments later my other companion—my husband—frantically rescued my iPhone from the depths of crystal clear waters. First aid involved promptly powering off the phone and depositing “him” into a bag of rice where “he” would remain for a week (or two!), drying out

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The Doctor Will Share With You Now

Apr 17, 2014, 4:43 PM, Posted by Risa Lavizzo-Mourey

Elaine Benes Seinfeld Screen Grab for Risa OpenNotes LinkedIn blog post

What does an episode of the Seinfeld show have in common with an RWJF national initiative?

In the first case, Seinfeld character Elaine Benes gets to see the notes written about her by her doctor. In the second, OpenNotes promotes exactly the same thing—patient access to the visit notes written by their doctors.

In Elaine’s case, that access was accidental. She took a quick look at her chart, only to see herself described as “difficult.” And merriment ensued.

Under the OpenNotes initiative, which started in 2010, Elaine would have been able to check out her doctor visit notes via a web-based portal. She wouldn’t have needed to sneak a peek. It’s unlikely she would have been described as “difficult.”

Numerous studies show that patients do want to see their records, and the evidence suggests that when they do, it leads to better health.

In a new post on the professional social networking site LinkedIn, RWJF President and CEO Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, notes that the concept is catching on, and OpenNotes is leading the charge. “OpenNotes will lead not only to a more efficient health care system,” she writes, “but better health for all of us.”

Read Lavizzo-Mourey’s LinkedIn post

Understanding The Value In Medicare's Physician Payment Data Dump

Apr 14, 2014, 9:24 AM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

New Jersey Patient Care

A 35-year battle is over and the taxpayers have won: We have the right to know how much physicians receive in Medicare dollars in exchange for providing our care. But now that the Centers for Medicare and Medicare government has released data on $77 billion in Medicare Part B payments to providers during 2012, what do we really know—or have—that we didn’t have previously? Information alone isn’t knowledge or, for that matter, insight.

For consumers, the slew of raw data ultimately may be useful if it can be packaged into applications that help them compare the way physicians practice—as the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology now proposes in a newly announced challenge. Private payers, such as insurers, may also find the Medicare data useful, as they can the information to better understand the practice patterns of providers they include in their networks.

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