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If It’s Broken, They Fix It

Jul 30, 2014, 3:25 PM, Posted by Risa Lavizzo-Mourey

 A nurse fills a syringe, while another nurse watches

By “broken,” we mean medical equipment or processes that could use a little improvement—and sometimes a lot of improvement. And by “they,” we mean nurses who harness the power of their own creativity, often using whatever material they have on hand—and sometimes taking inventiveness to a whole new level.

They call them MakerNurses, eager participants in the emerging “maker” movement. One MakerNurse, Roxana Reyna, RN, of Corpus Christi, was honored at the recent White House Maker Faire for her innovative wound-care techniques in caring for infants born with their organs outside of their bellies, sparing them immediate surgery.

RWJF supports such nurse-inventors through the Little Devices @ MIT initiative’s MakerNurse program, because they hold the potential to make health care more effective and affordable.

It’s a sound investment with even larger possibilities, said RWJF President and CEO Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, writing in the professional social networking site LinkedIn.

“The “maker” movement has the potential to empower all kinds of people to devise the solutions that make possible a Culture of Health—not just nurses, but caregivers, patients, and family members, all creating and sharing devices and ideas that improve health.”

Read Lavizzo-Mourey’s blog post on LinkedIn

Advanced Practice Nursing: Providing Care and Promoting Health

Jul 29, 2014, 10:50 AM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

Check out an August 1 Google+ Hangout with the Campaign for Action and RWJF.

The U.S. population is growing, getting older and suffering from more chronic disease. Thanks to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), more people are gaining health coverage and the means to obtain care. And there’s a widespread view that the country faces a drastic shortage of doctors—and primary care providers in particular.

So why are so many states seemingly determined not to let advanced practice registered nurses deliver the primary care they specifically trained to provide—and help millions of patients in the process?

Across the country, 31 states impose varying limits on the ability of nurse practitioners (one of the four types of advanced practice registered nurses) to evaluate patients; diagnose, order and interpret diagnostic tests; and to initiate and manage many treatments, including prescribing medications.

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Putting a Female Face on the Need for a Culture of Health

Jul 25, 2014, 11:29 AM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

A doctor examines a patient.  An image appears on a computer monitor.

Statistics are “human beings with the tears washed away,” an old saying goes. Sadly, the tears behind one set of statistics, showing that women’s life expectancy has been falling in just under half of U.S. counties, have rarely garnered much notice.

How to put a face on this story, to help mobilize corrective action?

Progress toward that end was made last week, when the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation teamed up with Women’s Policy, Inc, a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that seeks to inform policy-making on women’s issues, to sponsor a briefing on that subject on Capitol Hill. About 75 people, including several female members of Congress, gathered in the Rayburn House Office Building to learn what is driving the widespread trend of poorer female health. (Watch the webcast by clicking here).

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Doing More Means Doing Less: Young Innovators Lead the Charge

Jul 23, 2014, 1:28 PM, Posted by Emmy Ganos

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Here at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, we often talk about the idea of making the healthy choice the easy choice. To many of us, that means putting the cookies in a high cabinet, and putting the fruit on the counter. But when I think about building a Culture of Health in America, and especially within our health care system, making the healthy choice the easy choice means so much more.

In health care, often the healthy choice actually means doing less—fewer invasive tests and less dependence on medication—and instead watchfully waiting or making healthy lifestyle changes. But it’s not always easy to show a patient that you care when you only have a few minutes to spend together, and ordering a test or prescribing a medication is a simple way to show “I’m doing something to help you.” The trouble is, those tests, procedures and treatments often don't help, and sometimes they can hurt.

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Let’s Help Each Other Cope With Stress

Jul 11, 2014, 12:04 PM, Posted by Risa Lavizzo-Mourey

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Just about everybody experiences stress, to a greater or lesser degree. The bad news: Too many of us fall into the "greater" category.

All of that stress has consequences not just for our mental health, but for our overall wellbeing, says Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, writing in the professional social networking site LinkedIn.

Lavizzo-Mourey cites the results of a recent NPR/RWJF/Harvard School of Public Health poll, which shows:

  • One in four said they experienced a great deal of stress in the previous month.
  • Almost half reported a major stressful event or experience within the past year.
  • Seventy-four percent said stress affected their health.
  • Forty-three percent said that a health concern is a leading cause of their stress.
  • Eighty percent of people in poor health reported that their health problems raised their level of stress.

If we are to make progress in building a Culture of Health, we need to acknowledge the deleterious role of stress in Americans' lives and health—and everybody needs to be at the table.

"This is clearly an area where health care providers, communities, and employers can help," Lavizzo-Mourey writes.

Read Lavizzo-Mourey's blog post on LinkedIn

Carrying the Burden of Stress

Jul 7, 2014, 11:36 AM, Posted by Jeff Meade

Forum at Harvard School of Public Health: The Health Burden of Stress, and What We Can Do About It. Presented in collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and NPR. (July 9, 2014)

Nearly half of us suffer through one major stressful event every year, and the weight of that stress can be heavy indeed. Take, for example, trouble at work, problems in a personal relationship, or the death of someone close to you.

At the top of the list: health issues—either yours, or those of a loved one. In fact, a health concern is the leading cause of stress for 43 percent of us. And all of that emotional turmoil can have a ripple effect, extending out into the realm of our overall well-being.

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What’s Keeping the Cardiac Polypill off the Market?

Jul 3, 2014, 10:05 AM, Posted by Sheree Crute

Lisa Ranson Lisa Ranson

No matter how busy Lisa Ranson’s morning gets, somewhere between preparing breakfast and suiting up for work or play, she takes the first cluster of eight pills that protect her from a family legacy of heart disease so powerful she had bypass surgery at 34.

Even at that young age, she was no stranger to daily prescription regimens. Growing up, she watched her dad struggle. These days they compare notes. “He’s survived two heart attacks, had bypass surgery, and he has a pacemaker,” Ranson says.

An avid walker who treks three and a half miles most days near her home in the small town of Dunbar, W.Va., Ranson is now 51 and in great shape. But her healthy lifestyle is no match for her genetic inheritance—she is one of 34 million people living with hypercholesterolemia.

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Bedtime Story

Jul 1, 2014, 10:33 AM, Posted by Jeff Meade

Sarah Meade Reading Pic Sarah, having a read at Granny's house

The globby tears, the quavering voice, the pudgy outstretched hands, the plaintive word “please.” They all come to mind as vividly as if it were yesterday.

Our daughter Sarah was (and still is, at 27) a good soul, but like every small child, she had her moments. And when those “moments” more or less coincided with bedtime, the worst punishment we could mete out was to refuse to read her bedtime stories—or “sturries,” as she called them. We would kiss her good night, and adjourn to the living room, there to sit and look at each other guiltily as our little girl suffered the tortures of the damned.

We listened to that heartbreaking little plea, “But I HAVE to have sturries!” echoing down the hall, and our hearts would break, too. We felt like the worst parents ever

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Promoting A “Green” Culture of Health: Instead of Wasting Food, Getting it to Those Who Need It

Jun 25, 2014, 3:54 PM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

Mercer Street Friends Food Bank Warehouse Trenton

“A mind is a terrible thing to waste,” goes an old slogan of the United Negro College Fund. Another terrible thing to waste is healthy food.

That’s especially true in a nation where 1 in 7 U.S. households are “food insecure”—that is, they lack consistent, dependable access, typically for financial reasons, to “enough food for active, healthy living,” as a U.S. Department of Agriculture report puts it. About 1 in 10 U.S. households have food-insecure children—an equally appalling reality in a country that wastes an estimated 30 to 40 percent of its food supply, or a whopping 133 billion pounds of food in 2010 alone.

In California’s Orange County, however, a solution is at hand—and there’s no reason it couldn’t take hold and spread nationwide. Since 2012, the Waste Not Orange County Coalition, a public-private partnership, has worked to boost donations to local food pantries of surplus healthy food from local restaurants, grocery stores and other facilities. The organization was formed out of the realization that enough food was tossed out every day to feed the nearly 380,000 local residents—almost half of them children—who are deemed food insecure.

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Special Olympics Holds Lessons, and Inspiration, for All of Us

Jun 24, 2014, 2:30 AM, Posted by Catherine Arnst

 

Let me win, but if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt.”

—Special Olympics motto

The other day I cheered myself hoarse during a swim relay for a team from Maryland that put their all into the race. In fact, the whole viewing crowd cheered on this team. When they finished, the athletes were jubilant, hugging each other and their opponents, thrilled by their performance in this national event. It didn’t seem to bother them much that they finished last.

The 2014 USA Games for the Special Olympics, the world’s largest organization for people with intellectual disabilities, was held in New Jersey June 14-21. Some 3,500 children and adults from all 50 states competed in 16 different sports, and the vast majority took tremendous pleasure in the pure joy of athletics. Sure, plenty were fiercely competitive, but they were also happy and proud to have the opportunity to compete to the best of their ability.

That was pretty inspirational to the 110 staff members from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation who volunteered at the Special Olympics.

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