Explore the Blog Explore Blog

Now Viewing: Featured Posts

Poll: People Worry about Far More than Disease When it Comes to Health

Mar 3, 2015, 9:52 AM, Posted by Catherine Arnst

Q&A with Robert Blendon, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

070924.RWJF.WestVa.01690

This week a public opinion poll was released by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health asking people to list the factors most likely to cause ill health in adults. The top five included lack of access to high-quality medical care (42%), and viruses or bacteria (40%)—not a surprise—but also such socio-economic factors as personal behavior (40%), high stress (37%), and exposure to air, water, or chemical pollution (35%). And a majority (54%) said that being abused or neglected in childhood is an extremely important risk factor for ill health later in life.

Robert J. Blendon, Richard L. Menschel Professor of Health Policy and Political Analysis at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, led the poll and recently talked to RWJF Media Director Catherine Arnst about some of the key results. (Both questions and answers were edited for clarity)  

View full post

A Warrior for a Healthier, More Equitable America

Feb 27, 2015, 4:23 PM, Posted by Risa Lavizzo-Mourey

Andy Hyman / RWJF Andrew D. Hyman, JD

Andy Hyman was a warrior for a healthier, more equitable America.

He dedicated his life and career to social justice and progress for the most vulnerable people among us. As a government official, advocate, and philanthropic leader, Andy was tenacious in his pursuit of a singular vision: that everyone in America would have the coverage necessary to access high quality health care—physical, behavioral, or both.

And what incredible success he had.

View full post

We Must All Play a Role in Ending Childhood Obesity

Feb 5, 2015, 1:00 PM, Posted by Sen. Bill Frist, MD

A mother walking with her daughters on sidewalk

We all want our kids and grandkids to grow up happier and healthier than we did. Instead, today’s children are the first generation of young Americans to face the prospect of living their entire lives in poorer health and dying younger than previous generations.

The reason is no mystery. Too many of our children – one in three, according to studies – are overweight. We are allowing, and in some ways encouraging, our kids to consume more calories, more sugar, more fat, more sodium. At the same time we’re enabling a more sedentary lifestyle. Running, jumping, skipping, dancing, biking – today’s children simply don’t move as much as they once did, making it that much harder to keep off the pounds.

The childhood obesity epidemic is having a devastating affect on too many families. Obese and overweight children are sick more often. They too often endure prejudice and bullying at school, leaving them embarrassed and depressed. They miss more school. When they grow up, they have more difficulty leading productive work lives. And they are more likely to suffer from chronic illnesses directly linked to obesity, such as diabetes and heart disease. 

View full post

Roadmaps Out of Fantasyland: RWJF’s Outbreaks Report and the National Health Preparedness Security Index

Jan 30, 2015, 5:47 PM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

Outbreaks 2014

“When you hear hoofbeats, think of horses, not zebras,” the late Theodore Woodward, a professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, cautioned his students in the 1940s. Woodward’s warning is still invoked to discourage doctors from making rare medical diagnoses for sick patients, when more common ones are usually the cause.

And while many Americans have worried about contracting Ebola—in viral terms, a kind of “zebra”—more commonplace microbial “horses,” such as influenza and measles viruses, continue to pose far greater threats. For instance, a large multistate measles outbreak has been traced to Disneyland theme parks in California—while this year’s strain of seasonal flu has turned out to be severe and widespread.

One obvious conclusion is that many microbes remain a harmful health menace, expected to kill hundreds of thousands of Americans this year. Another—speaking of Disneyland—is that much of America appears to live in a kind of fantasyland, thinking that it is protected against infectious disease.

View full post

Some Unconventional Approaches to Stress: Pioneering Ideas Podcast Episode 7

Jan 29, 2015, 7:00 PM, Posted by Lori Melichar

(Please note that this podcast player might not work in some versions of Internet Explorer. Please view this page in another browser, such as Chrome, Firefox or Safari. You may also access the episode via SoundCloud.)

A man asking for money on the subway this week told me how Hurricane Sandy led to a series of events that left him stressed out by the challenges of putting food on the table for his children.

Recessions, hurricanes, violence—how many ways can we count that add stress to our lives? Whether dealing with economic stress, the stress of caring for an aging parent, or even the stress of keeping up with email, research shows that all of it affects our health. As Alexandra Drane, a guest in the latest episode of RWJF’s Pioneering Ideas podcast, puts it: “When life goes wrong, health goes wrong.”

This episode of the Pioneering Ideas podcast explores unconventional approaches to tackling stress­—and other health problems—with energizing possibilities that could also transform health and health care. From monitoring electricity use as a way of helping the elderly stay in their homes, to measuring the indirect health effects of social services (what if heating assistance led to greater medication adherence?), these conversations offer cutting-edge ideas for building a Culture of Health.

View full post

Field Notes: What Cuba Can Teach Us about Building a Culture of Health

Jan 29, 2015, 9:54 AM, Posted by Maryjoan Ladden, Susan Mende

MaryJoan Ladden and Susan Mende Trip to Cuba

Ever since President Obama announced the restoration of diplomatic ties between the United States and Cuba, there’s been growing excitement over the potential for new opportunities for tourism, as well as technology and business exchanges. Most people assume that the flow will be one-sided, with the United States providing expertise and investment to help Cuba’s struggling economy and decaying infrastructure.

That assumption would be wrong. America can—and already has—learned a lot from Cuba. At RWJF, we support MEDICC, an organization that strives to use lessons gleaned from Cuba’s health care system to improve outcomes in four medically underserved communities in the United States—South Los Angeles; Oakland, Calif.; Albuquerque, N.M.; and the Bronx, N.Y. Even with very limited resources, Cuba has universal medical and dental care and provides preventive strategies and primary care at the neighborhood level, resulting in enviable health outcomes. Cuba has a low infant mortality rate and the lowest HIV rate in the Americas, for example—with a fraction of the budget spent in the United States.

View full post

'Getting What You Want': Aligning Goals with Actual Care in Patients with Serious Illness

Jan 22, 2015, 3:00 PM

Rachelle Bernacki
Aging in America

The Institute of Medicine recently released a report entitled Dying in America: Improving Quality and Honoring Individual Preferences Near the End of Life. The news headlines read: “Panel Urges Overhauling of Health Care of End of Life.”

Here’s why: Most Americans wish to die at home and want to avoid heroic measures to keep them alive. Yet most die in institutional settings like hospitals and nursing homes, and 20 percent die in intensive care units.

The transition of death from the home to institutional settings over the past 40 years has been promoted by the advent of new medical technologies. While these remarkable technologies can be life-saving for certain patients, for many others aggressive therapies may simply prolong the dying process and extend suffering. In addition, many patients who die in institutional settings die with undertreated pain and difficult or labored breathing. And many report inadequate communication with their physicians about their end-of-life preferences.

Numerous studies show that patients want to have conversations about their end-of-life care and expect their physicians to initiate these discussions. When these conversations occur, there is greater alignment between patients’ wishes and the care they receive; higher patient quality of life; less frequent use of non-beneficial life-sustaining treatments; more use of hospice care; reduced family distress; and reduced resource use and costs. However, many physicians do not feel comfortable having these conversations and, in fact, identify more barriers to having these discussions than do patients.

View full post

Preparing Family Caregivers to Provide High-Quality Care for People with Dementia

Jan 22, 2015, 9:00 AM

Tatiana Sadak, PhD, PMHNP, is an assistant professor at the University of Washington School of Nursing and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholar (2013-2016). She is working to promote “dementia caregiver activation,” a process of preparing caregivers to become ready to manage the multiple needs of loved ones with dementia while caring for themselves.

Tatiana Sadak
Aging in America

The well-documented personal and societal burdens of dementia are the central focus of the National Alzheimer’s Plan, which calls for extensive reforms in the delivery of health care for patients with dementia and their family caregivers. RWJF answered this national call to action by funding several innovative dementia health services research projects and nurturing the careers of junior dementia researchers.

I was fortunate to receive RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars funding. It will make it possible for me to focus a majority of my time on improving health services for people living with dementia and for their family care partners—or ‘caregivers.’

Dementia patients suffer brain failure that leads to progressive loss of autonomy and the inability to understand and meet personal health care needs. Clinicians conduct health assessments, create care plans, and treat symptoms, but it is dementia family caregivers who deliver the day-to-day care and health management these patients need. There is, however, considerable variation in their capacity to assist care recipients in making health care decisions, for providing daily care, and for navigating health care systems.

View full post

Nurses and the Future of Long-Term Services and Supports

Jan 20, 2015, 12:00 PM, Posted by Maryjoan Ladden

Maryjoan Ladden, PhD, RN, FAAN, is a senior program officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

Maryjoan Ladden / RWJF

By 2050, as many as 84 million Americans will be 65 or older, and most of them will need some sort of help in maintaining their health and well-being. For them, and for the millions of younger Americans who will need similar assistance, it’s essential that we come to grips with the challenge of providing effective and affordable long-term services and supports (LTSS).

As it stands right now, we’ve got a long way to go. But the effort is under way, and nurses are at the forefront. At more than 3 million strong, the nursing workforce will be central to meeting growing demand for LTSS. In addition to providing clinical care, nurses can assess the long-term health prospects of individuals with physical and cognitive impairments, develop customized care plans, monitor individuals’ responses to care, coordinate care across providers and settings, and oversee the quality of the assistance older adults receive.

Aging in America

The latest issue of RWJF’s Charting Nursing’s Future policy brief series highlights a number of trailblazing LTSS efforts in which nurses play a key role. Among them:

  • Transitional Care. The Central New Jersey Care Transitions Program (CNJCTP) is one of a number of sites taking part in the Affordable Care Act-funded Community-Based Care Transitions Program. Six hospitals in the CNJCTP region work with registered nurses (RNs) and social workers, who together act as health coaches to teach self-care strategies to high-risk, chronically ill Medicare beneficiaries. Registered nurses (RNs) focus on beneficiaries’ symptoms and health care needs, including medication management, while social workers attend to socioeconomic needs that may lead beneficiaries to return to the hospital. Coaches visit patients in their homes within three days of discharge, facilitate a follow-up visit with a primary care provider, and follow up by phone for a month after discharge.

View full post

Open Health Data: How To Go for the Gold?

Jan 16, 2015, 1:25 PM, Posted by Susan Dentzer

Dr. Eric Topol Eric J. Topol, M.D.

In his new book, The Patient Will See You Now, Eric Topol, MD, invokes the famed Arabian folk tale One Thousand and One Nights, in which the poor woodcutter Ali Baba utters "Open Sesame" to unseal the cave where thieves have a treasure of gold coins. Topol asks "whether we, like Ali Baba, can breech the gate that keeps us from [health and health care] data, to a new world of openness and transparency."

It's worth remembering that, in the folk tale, Ali Baba does get rich — but after fighting over the gold, almost everybody else ends up dead.

So how do we ensure that the story of increasingly open health data has a more universally happy ending?

It won’t be easy, and Topol acknowledges the quandaries of dealing with the "gold" — the enormous flow of health data already under way.

Among the issues:

View full post