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Building the Information-Rich Culture of Health

Aug 20, 2014, 10:36 AM, Posted by Mike Painter, Susan Dentzer

Reform by the Numbers Visual

What if your mother wanted to take some ibuprofen for her arthritis, but didn’t know if it would interact adversely with her other medications?

No problem, right?

She could whip out her smartphone and launch an app that connected to her local health information exchange. Within fractions of a second, the exchange would verify her identity, locate the computer storing her electronic health record (EHR), and shoot an answer back to her.

This scenario is just one example of the many ways that having timely access to health information could contribute to health. It could, that is, if the nation had an agreed-upon way to organize data about health and health care in ways that made it easily accessible and usable while still secure and protected.

But for now, we don’t.

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Preventing Suicide: If You See Something, Say Something

Aug 13, 2014, 9:16 AM, Posted by Brent Thompson

Dave and Brent Dave and Brent

The second week of August is one of the worst weeks of the year for me. At least it has been since 2008.

Six years ago this week, my friend Dave decided he had enough of the daily struggles of this world and took his own life on a trailhead in the desert near Tucson, Ariz.

He was 31 years old and left behind a fiancé, family, and scores of friends who loved him deeply.

Dave was one of the most incredible people I’ve ever known: a generous soul, full of humor, creativity, compassion, and love. He had more friends than anyone I know. Dave elevated everyone who knew him, inspiring them to find joy, open their minds, chase dreams, and see beauty in the world. It is impossible to count the lives Dave changed for the better, including my own.

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To Build a Culture of Health, There Is No Place Like Home

Aug 11, 2014, 3:36 PM, Posted by Kristin Schubert

Child First

A century ago, it was normal for a doctor to make a house call to tend to a patient in need. By the time I was a child growing up in New Jersey in the 1970s and 80s, the practice had become virtually obsolete.

The case for bringing health care back into the home is becoming more compelling every day. One place where we see the potential to make a big impact is with new parents and newborns.

Last month, JAMA Pediatrics published new research from on the effects of nurse-home visits on maternal and child health. The randomized, clinical trial followed a group of low-income, primarily African American mothers and children living in disadvantaged, urban neighborhoods of Memphis over a 19-year period. Specifically, they wanted to see whether home visits conducted by the Nurse-Family Partnership before and after a birth influenced whether the mothers and children died prematurely.

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In a Culture of Health, People Get the Sleep They Need

Aug 11, 2014, 9:52 AM, Posted by Lori Melichar

sleep

How can we help people get more sleep?

I asked that question in a blog post back in February. Since then, I’ve been actively exploring the area of sleep health. I’ve talked with researchers, behavioral economists, physicians and mindfulness experts. I’ve talked with people who think they get enough sleep, and people who think they don’t. I’ve talked with anyone I can to discover what we need to know and do in order to help Americans sleep.

Sleep has tremendous ripple effects on our overall health and well-being. Lack of sleep affects your brain. There’s evidence that it affects your working memory. And as any new parent will confirm, we don’t need research to tell us that those who are sleep deprived are less able to control their tempers.

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An Ounce of Prevention, Even for Serious Mental Illness

Aug 7, 2014, 1:30 AM, Posted by Jane Isaacs Lowe

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As we work to build a Culture of Health for all Americans, it is time to end the stigmatizing distinctions between mental and physical health. After all, the brain and the body are in constant contact, and affect the well-being of each other in too many ways to count. A true Culture of Health recognizes the interdependence of mental and physical health, and places a premium on prevention and early detection of illness, regardless of type.

We commonly provide preemptive treatment or suggest early lifestyle changes for people at risk for diabetes before the condition evolves into full-blown disease. Yet, we typically don’t approach care for serious mental illness in the same way. It’s time for that to change.

The results from a recently released national study of the Early Detection and Intervention for the Prevention of Psychosis Program (EDIPPP), a project RWJF funded between 2006 and 2013, demonstrate that early intervention to prevent the onset or progression of psychosis in teenagers and young adults improves health and well-being. By helping family members, pediatricians, teachers, young people, and other community members identify young people experiencing early symptoms of serious mental health problems, EDIPPP was able to engage and treat these young people early. That early intervention in turn helped them stay in school, remain employed, and maintain vital connections to family and friends. These benefits mitigated the effects of mental illness, and allowed these teens and young adults to lead healthier and more productive lives.

This study should shift our thinking about how we best treat young people at high risk of serious mental illness. It should also remind us to look at good health and good health practices through a much broader lens, because building a Culture of Health means finding and sharing solutions, and celebrating signs of progress.

Read a Washington Post article on the program

Read a first-person post about depression and the best way to support those who are suffering with it

Read a post by Brent Thompson on bipolar disorder and the death of a friend

Doing More Means Doing Less: Young Innovators Lead the Charge

Jul 23, 2014, 1:28 PM, Posted by Emmy Ganos

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Here at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, we often talk about the idea of making the healthy choice the easy choice. To many of us, that means putting the cookies in a high cabinet, and putting the fruit on the counter. But when I think about building a Culture of Health in America, and especially within our health care system, making the healthy choice the easy choice means so much more.

In health care, often the healthy choice actually means doing less—fewer invasive tests and less dependence on medication—and instead watchfully waiting or making healthy lifestyle changes. But it’s not always easy to show a patient that you care when you only have a few minutes to spend together, and ordering a test or prescribing a medication is a simple way to show “I’m doing something to help you.” The trouble is, those tests, procedures and treatments often don't help, and sometimes they can hurt.

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Carrying the Burden of Stress

Jul 7, 2014, 11:36 AM, Posted by Jeff Meade

Forum at Harvard School of Public Health: The Health Burden of Stress, and What We Can Do About It. Presented in collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and NPR. (July 9, 2014)

Nearly half of us suffer through one major stressful event every year, and the weight of that stress can be heavy indeed. Take, for example, trouble at work, problems in a personal relationship, or the death of someone close to you.

At the top of the list: health issues—either yours, or those of a loved one. In fact, a health concern is the leading cause of stress for 43 percent of us. And all of that emotional turmoil can have a ripple effect, extending out into the realm of our overall well-being.

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Bedtime Story

Jul 1, 2014, 10:33 AM, Posted by Jeff Meade

Sarah Meade Reading Pic Sarah, having a read at Granny's house

The globby tears, the quavering voice, the pudgy outstretched hands, the plaintive word “please.” They all come to mind as vividly as if it were yesterday.

Our daughter Sarah was (and still is, at 27) a good soul, but like every small child, she had her moments. And when those “moments” more or less coincided with bedtime, the worst punishment we could mete out was to refuse to read her bedtime stories—or “sturries,” as she called them. We would kiss her good night, and adjourn to the living room, there to sit and look at each other guiltily as our little girl suffered the tortures of the damned.

We listened to that heartbreaking little plea, “But I HAVE to have sturries!” echoing down the hall, and our hearts would break, too. We felt like the worst parents ever

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Supporting Families to Succeed

Jun 30, 2014, 9:31 AM, Posted by Jane Isaacs Lowe, Martha Davis

ACEs Billboard Version 2 Mobile

It has been more than 15 years since the Centers for Disease Control published the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) study. What we learned from that study, and then subsequent research, is that sustained exposure to toxic stress and adverse childhood experiences—including abuse, neglect, neighborhood violence and chronic poverty—without the support of an engaged supportive parent or adult caretaker, can have serious extended effects on children’s subsequent development and success in life. This stress, without intervention, can lead to a lifetime of poorer health, including chronic diseases in adulthood, such as heart disease and diabetes.

In 2012, the American Academy of Pediatrics published a policy statement calling on pediatricians to become leaders in an effort to decrease children’s exposure to toxic stress and to mitigate its negative effects. They acknowledged how much science had taught us about how our environment affects our “learning capacities, adaptive behaviors, lifelong physical and mental health, and adult productivity.” The statement was a significant shift in the conversation. It provided a biological framework and imperative for why we must do something about adverse childhood experiences now.

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Special Olympics Holds Lessons, and Inspiration, for All of Us

Jun 24, 2014, 2:30 AM, Posted by Catherine Arnst

 

Let me win, but if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt.”

—Special Olympics motto

The other day I cheered myself hoarse during a swim relay for a team from Maryland that put their all into the race. In fact, the whole viewing crowd cheered on this team. When they finished, the athletes were jubilant, hugging each other and their opponents, thrilled by their performance in this national event. It didn’t seem to bother them much that they finished last.

The 2014 USA Games for the Special Olympics, the world’s largest organization for people with intellectual disabilities, was held in New Jersey June 14-21. Some 3,500 children and adults from all 50 states competed in 16 different sports, and the vast majority took tremendous pleasure in the pure joy of athletics. Sure, plenty were fiercely competitive, but they were also happy and proud to have the opportunity to compete to the best of their ability.

That was pretty inspirational to the 110 staff members from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation who volunteered at the Special Olympics.

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