Author Archives: Sheree Crute

Help or Hype: The True Costs of Robotic Surgery

Jul 14, 2014, 10:29 AM, Posted by Sheree Crute

Robotic Surgery

Joe Meyer is the model of a well-educated, engaged patient. A self-described “typical Midwestern guy” who settled in Chapel Hill, N.C., to raise a family and build a career, Meyer did everything in his power to make the best decisions when his 2013 physical produced unexpected and frightening results.

“I live a pretty healthy lifestyle. I exercise. I eat well,” says the 62-year-old chief operating officer of a large manufacturing company. “I was very surprised when my PSA test came back at 5.1 [3 to 4 is normal]. Further testing showed that I had prostate cancer.”

One of more than 200,000 men who are diagnosed each year, Meyer put his faith in his physician and the health care system when gathering information about treatment.

“After the biopsy, they told me my Gleason score was 7. [The higher the score on a scale of 1 to 10, the more likely a cancer will spread.] I realized I was high risk, so I started reading as much as I could about the choices I was offered—hormone therapy, radiation, or prostate removal.” He chose robotic prostatectomy over open or laparoscopic prostatectomy. Surgery, as opposed to hormone therapy or radiation, was widely considered a good decision for someone with Meyer’s prognosis.

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What’s Keeping the Cardiac Polypill off the Market?

Jul 3, 2014, 10:05 AM, Posted by Sheree Crute

Lisa Ranson Lisa Ranson

No matter how busy Lisa Ranson’s morning gets, somewhere between preparing breakfast and suiting up for work or play, she takes the first cluster of eight pills that protect her from a family legacy of heart disease so powerful she had bypass surgery at 34.

Even at that young age, she was no stranger to daily prescription regimens. Growing up, she watched her dad struggle. These days they compare notes. “He’s survived two heart attacks, had bypass surgery, and he has a pacemaker,” Ranson says.

An avid walker who treks three and a half miles most days near her home in the small town of Dunbar, W.Va., Ranson is now 51 and in great shape. But her healthy lifestyle is no match for her genetic inheritance—she is one of 34 million people living with hypercholesterolemia.

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