Author Archives: Mike Painter

Data for Health—Coming to a Town Near You

Oct 16, 2014, 6:00 AM, Posted by Mike Painter

Listen Image by Ky Olsen (CCBY)

We have some questions for you—questions, that is, about health information. What is it?  Can you get it when you need it? What if your community needed important information to make your town or city safe or keep it healthy? How about information about your health care? Can your doctors and nurses get health care information about you or your family members when they need it quickly?

I came across a recent Wall Street Journal article about a remarkable story of health, resilience and survival in the face of an unimaginable health crisis—a Liberian community facing the advancing Ebola infections in their country got health information and used it to protect themselves. When the community first learned of the rapidly advancing Ebola cases coming toward them, the leaders in that Firestone company town in Liberia jumped on the Internet and performed a Google search for “Ebola”. From that Internet search they learned how to protect themselves. Then those brave people acted on that new information—that new knowledge. They did a number of things like use the information to build quarantine and care facilities as well as map the advancing illness cases in their town—so they could be smart about identifying, quarantining and caring for those infected with the virus—and then stop it. Months later, this town is now essentially a lone bright spot of health in a country devastated by death and illness. Why?  Because the leaders of that town used technology to get the critical health information they needed, and then they used it to act.

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Let’s Talk About Stress

Oct 2, 2014, 9:52 AM, Posted by Mike Painter

Mike Painter Mike Painter speaking at Health 2.0.

I recently returned from the Health 2.0 conference in California, which drew 2,000 health care innovators. One of the most popular Health 2.0 sessions was called “The Unmentionables”—where speakers discussed those important things that affect our health but we are often afraid to address. I participated in this year’s session where we talked stress—what it is and how it’s making us sick.

I’m an avid cyclist. That means I train a lot. Training on a bike means purposefully and intensely stressing your body—sometimes ridiculously hard—in order to make your body stronger, fitter and faster. In that sense stress can be really good. You can’t get stronger without it.

But here’s the key: as you ratchet up that stress—the miles, the hours on the bike, the intensity—you must work just as hard on the flipside, the buffering. The more you train, the more you have to focus on the rest, the sleep, your social supports, the yoga, the nutrition—whatever it takes.

If you don’t buffer you will burn out, get injured or sick, or all of the above. Without buffers, the stress will crush you.

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Building the Information-Rich Culture of Health

Aug 20, 2014, 10:36 AM, Posted by Mike Painter, Susan Dentzer

Reform by the Numbers Visual

What if your mother wanted to take some ibuprofen for her arthritis, but didn’t know if it would interact adversely with her other medications?

No problem, right?

She could whip out her smartphone and launch an app that connected to her local health information exchange. Within fractions of a second, the exchange would verify her identity, locate the computer storing her electronic health record (EHR), and shoot an answer back to her.

This scenario is just one example of the many ways that having timely access to health information could contribute to health. It could, that is, if the nation had an agreed-upon way to organize data about health and health care in ways that made it easily accessible and usable while still secure and protected.

But for now, we don’t.

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This Year’s Health Care Transformation Oscar Goes To…

Jun 17, 2013, 3:55 PM, Posted by Mike Painter

A doctor reviews information with a patient.

For an actor—let’s call her Jennifer for discussion purposes—who suddenly has a big award-winning breakthrough—there is nothing sudden about her success.  Jennifer’s accolades come to her not by accident but rather after years of below-the-radar hard work, striving and struggle.  That same principle applies to seeming sudden success in other fields—say, health care.  In fact, today let’s go crazy and salute some breakthrough health care actors.  Health care is transforming before our very eyes. 

Hang onto your hats, because it’s changing from one predominantly focused on churning out more services and procedures to one relentlessly driving the right care at the right time at the best price. 

That’s not happening all by itself. That slowly accelerating transformation could seem sudden—or spontaneous.  It might seem like it’s happening effortlessly—almost by magic.  Nothing, of course, could be further from the truth.  Trust me— there is a bunch of struggling, starving transformation artists who have been working years for this moment—like the great people at the Consumer-Purchaser Disclosure Project.

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Electronic Health Records: Are We There Yet? What’s Taking So Long?

Jun 4, 2013, 4:48 PM, Posted by Mike Painter

A doctor seeking information on a computer, two nurses are in the background.

I am a family physician, but one who doesn’t currently practice and importantly, one who isn’t slogging day after day through health care transformation. I do not want to be presumptuous here because the doctors and other health professionals who are doing this hard work are the heroes. They are caring for patients while at the same time facing tremendous pressure to transform their life’s work.  That includes overwhelming pressure to adopt and use new information technology.

This level of change is hard, difficult and confusing—with both forward progress and slips backward. Nevertheless, doctors, take heart, because you are making progress. It may be slow at times, but it’s substantial—and it’s impressive. Thank you. 

The Annals of Internal Medicine today published a study (I was one of the authors) finding that more than 40 percent of U.S. physicians have adopted at least a basic electronic health record (EHR),  highlighting continued progress in the rate of national physician adoption of EHRs. The study, also found that a much smaller number, about 9.8 percent of physicians, are ready for meaningful use of this new technology. 

Some might say, “Wake up, folks!”   Look at those small meaningful use numbers.  Change course, now.  After all of this time and tax-payer expense, less than 10 percent of doctors are actually ready to use these important tools meaningfully. What’s up with that? 

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