Author Archives: Ari Kramer

Stress: Withstanding the Waves

Sep 23, 2014, 11:42 AM, Posted by Ari Kramer

Infographic: stress_section
Infographic: stress_section

Infographic: How Do We Move From a Culture of Stress to a Culture of Health?

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As a kid, when you went to the beach, did you ever play that game where you’d wade into the ocean and test your strength against the waves? You'd stand your ground or get knocked over, and after a few minutes, you'd head back to shore.

We didn’t realize it at the time, but as we felt those waves roll by, we were getting an early glimpse of the stresses of everyday life. The difference is, as adults we can't choose to stand up to just the small ones. And for the most part, going back to shore is not an option.

In a survey RWJF conducted with the Harvard School of Public Health and NPR, about half of the public reported experiencing a major stressful event in the past year. In more than four in 10 instances, people reported events related specifically to health. Many also reported feeling a lot of stress connected with jobs and finances, family situations, and responsibility in general.

Over time, those waves can take their toll. And when they become overwhelming, they can truly wear us down, seriously affecting our both our physical and emotional health.

So how can we deal with these waves of stress? Certainly, there are proactive things we can all do help manage its effect on our lives—exercise, for example. At the same time, we’ve probably all experienced instances when we’d love nothing more than to get up early for a run or brisk walk—but don’t have the energy because stress kept us up at night. Or we may just be too tapped out from long hours, relationship struggles, caring for loved ones, etc., to spare the energy or the time.

If this sounds familiar, consider yourself human. Right next to you, whether at work, on the train, in your grocery store, is probably someone whose waves are similar to or bigger than your own. So at the same time as you try to manage your stress, ask yourself: What could be done to help others achieve a solid footing? In this ocean of ours, there’s never a shortage of opportunity to lend a helping hand.

Have an idea to help move from a culture of stress to a Culture of Health in the home, workplace or community? Please share below—we’d love to hear from you.

Sprinting Toward Workplace Wellness

Dec 6, 2013, 2:25 PM, Posted by Ari Kramer

Graciela Ruiz

Lots of things can turn a person into a health and fitness nut. For many, it might be influence from friends, or a life episode that demonstrates the pitfalls of focusing too little on health.

For Graciela Ruiz, it was just a matter of landing a job at the right place.

When Ruiz started working at Wakefern Food Corp., the merchandizing and distribution arm for ShopRite and PriceRite stores, she was eating lots of processed foods, and exercise figured very little into her routine. She particularly hated running. “I wouldn’t run unless someone was chasing me,” she says.

One day, the organizer of Wakefern’s run/walk club signed her up for the Jersey Shore Relay Marathon. He gave her the race’s shortest leg, a 5K, and she trained hard and did better than expected. Fast forward five years, and Graciela is now highly active in the club and numerous other wellness programs at the company. She says she will “run for two hours and be happy about it,” and has changed her eating habits to a point where “I’ll eat vegetables all day long.”

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African Americans' Lives Today: Reflections from an RWJF Investigator

Jun 11, 2013, 4:12 PM, Posted by Ari Kramer

James Jackson

Recently, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Harvard School of Public Health and National Public Radio conducted a national survey which provides a snapshot of African-Americans’ views on a range of issues in their personal lives and communities, including and beyond health and health care. A majority of respondents reported being overall satisfied with their lives and communities. At the same time, many reported concerns about their economic stability and resources to pay for a major illness, and experiences of discrimination.

To get some historical perspective and insights into how the findings relate to existing research, we spoke with James S. Jackson, Ph.D., professor at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, and director of its Institute for Social Research. For more than 40 years, Jackson has been studying the racial and ethnic influences on American personal, social and community life, and growing heterogeneity of the nation’s Black population. Also a RWJF Investigator in Health Policy Research, he is currently directing extensive surveys on the social and political behavior and mental and physical health of the African American and Black Caribbean populations.

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