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Healthy Communities: The Building Blocks of a Culture of Health

Aug 25, 2014, 9:15 AM, Posted by Jamie Bussel

Baldwin Park California

What do Corvallis, Ore.; Baldwin Park, Calif.; and Buffalo, N.Y. have in common? It certainly isn’t their weather.

Hint—the commonality is something much more relevant to RWJF’s newly refined mission. These three cities are building a Culture of Health for all their citizens. They are tapping into the skills and resources of a diverse group of partners to ensure everyone has access to healthy choices. It’s their collective efforts, along with dozens of other communities supported by the Foundation’s Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities (HKHC) program, that make me so optimistic about our organizational goal.

My strong belief that environments—physical, social and educational—play a prominent role in our individual health and well-being is what initially drew me to RWJF. So, in 2008, I excitedly embraced the opportunity to be the national program officer for HKHC, which addressed the root causes of childhood obesity by transforming the physical activity and food environments in which children and their families live, learn and play.

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Are E-Cigs a Gateway to Smoking for Teens?

Aug 21, 2014, 3:44 PM, Posted by Sheree Crute

Vaping Electronic Cigarette

As you step through the door of Beyond Vape, you are enveloped in the warm scent of vanilla, tinged with butterscotch. The sleek glass counters and display cases are reminiscent of a high-end cigar shop, but there are no tobacco leaves on hand here. This popular, high-end “vaping” parlor, on one of Williamsburg Brooklyn’s more popular streets, is one of seven the company owns on the East and West Coasts.

Vaping—or inhaling richly flavored, heated vapor through a slender, battery-powered tube—is the latest trend in “smoking,” without actually lighting a traditional cigarette. Cindy Hsu, the store’s manager, explains that some of her customers “vape" without even adding liquid nicotine to the tube’s cylinder. “They prefer to just enjoy the extensive menu of flavors such as mocha mint, kiwi strawberry and pineapple.”

Tasty flavors are one thing, but there’s another popular incentive to vape: the claim that vaping can help you stop smoking. Another neighborhood shop, Brooklyn Vaper, advertises its wares with a video explaining that vaping is a “greener, cheaper alternative to help you quit smoking effortlessly... while vaping in 40 flavors.”

Is that true? Can vaping or pre-packaged e-cigarettes help smokers quit?

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Straight Talk: Black Women, Hair and Exercise

Aug 21, 2014, 9:00 AM, Posted by Keecha Harris

When you're starting to exercise, you look for reasons not to, and sometimes the hair is one of those reasons.—U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin, August 2011

I once wrote about how black women can care for their hair when physically active. It featured the perspectives of women ages 21 to 65 on how we protect our weaved, straightened, and natural styles while exercising. After reading the post, a well-respected public health leader admitted, “I did not know that hair care was an issue that kept black women from exercising.”

I wasn’t surprised that a middle-aged, middle class, white male had missed this not-too-insignificant tidbit. But I was saddened that someone with a prominent role in prevention wasn’t aware of an important factor behind the obesity crisis among black women.

There are many reasons why four out of every five black women in the U.S. are overweight or obese: We live in neighborhoods that make eating cheap, high-calorie foods and beverages very easy, but physical activity very hard. Some wonder if our genes predispose us to excess weight; others say that we are beyond motivation, given data suggesting that too many of us suffer untreated depression.

But hair, for black women, adds a whole other level of complexity, as we struggle with how we can maintain our hairstyles while being physically active. Hair is no small matter for us—it is intimately connected with our life experiences, from whether we get married, to how much money we make, to who we socialize with. Ultimately hair is a powerful mediator for how African-American women feel about themselves.

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Building the Information-Rich Culture of Health

Aug 20, 2014, 10:36 AM, Posted by Mike Painter, Susan Dentzer

Reform by the Numbers Visual

What if your mother wanted to take some ibuprofen for her arthritis, but didn’t know if it would interact adversely with her other medications?

No problem, right?

She could whip out her smartphone and launch an app that connected to her local health information exchange. Within fractions of a second, the exchange would verify her identity, locate the computer storing her electronic health record (EHR), and shoot an answer back to her.

This scenario is just one example of the many ways that having timely access to health information could contribute to health. It could, that is, if the nation had an agreed-upon way to organize data about health and health care in ways that made it easily accessible and usable while still secure and protected.

But for now, we don’t.

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A Survivor’s Take on Depression: We are the Sad Ones. Try to Understand Us

Aug 15, 2014, 11:22 AM

Depression Painting to go with blog post Painted in the hospital after suicide attempt

(This post was written by a member of the RWJF family who has asked to remain anonymous.)

Every day I worry that I will be caught. It could happen any time, any place, and by any one person that looks past my smile and into my eyes and knows immediately that I am not like him nor her. He or she will not see the color of my eyes, but rather that I am hiding something.

I have been in and out of therapy since the age of 9, and on and off antidepressants of every color and brand for more than 20 years. Yet I stand here today with the same diagnosis that I had when I was a child, despite the “help” and the “work” that I have devoted to my illness ever since I can remember. I have clinical depression.

I will never be “okay” by conventional standards without medication. I have finally come to realize that this is not my fault, but rather a product of my DNA. Nonetheless, I hide in shame. No one knows of my diagnosis, or the medicines that I take to help control it, or the acting that I perform daily to hide it.

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Preventing Suicide: If You See Something, Say Something

Aug 13, 2014, 9:16 AM, Posted by Brent Thompson

Dave and Brent Dave and Brent

The second week of August is one of the worst weeks of the year for me. At least it has been since 2008.

Six years ago this week, my friend Dave decided he had enough of the daily struggles of this world and took his own life on a trailhead in the desert near Tucson, Ariz.

He was 31 years old and left behind a fiancé, family, and scores of friends who loved him deeply.

Dave was one of the most incredible people I’ve ever known: a generous soul, full of humor, creativity, compassion, and love. He had more friends than anyone I know. Dave elevated everyone who knew him, inspiring them to find joy, open their minds, chase dreams, and see beauty in the world. It is impossible to count the lives Dave changed for the better, including my own.

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To Build a Culture of Health, There Is No Place Like Home

Aug 11, 2014, 3:36 PM, Posted by Kristin Schubert

Child First

A century ago, it was normal for a doctor to make a house call to tend to a patient in need. By the time I was a child growing up in New Jersey in the 1970s and 80s, the practice had become virtually obsolete.

The case for bringing health care back into the home is becoming more compelling every day. One place where we see the potential to make a big impact is with new parents and newborns.

Last month, JAMA Pediatrics published new research from on the effects of nurse-home visits on maternal and child health. The randomized, clinical trial followed a group of low-income, primarily African American mothers and children living in disadvantaged, urban neighborhoods of Memphis over a 19-year period. Specifically, they wanted to see whether home visits conducted by the Nurse-Family Partnership before and after a birth influenced whether the mothers and children died prematurely.

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In a Culture of Health, People Get the Sleep They Need

Aug 11, 2014, 9:52 AM, Posted by Lori Melichar

sleep

How can we help people get more sleep?

I asked that question in a blog post back in February. Since then, I’ve been actively exploring the area of sleep health. I’ve talked with researchers, behavioral economists, physicians and mindfulness experts. I’ve talked with people who think they get enough sleep, and people who think they don’t. I’ve talked with anyone I can to discover what we need to know and do in order to help Americans sleep.

Sleep has tremendous ripple effects on our overall health and well-being. Lack of sleep affects your brain. There’s evidence that it affects your working memory. And as any new parent will confirm, we don’t need research to tell us that those who are sleep deprived are less able to control their tempers.

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An Ounce of Prevention, Even for Serious Mental Illness

Aug 7, 2014, 1:30 AM, Posted by Jane Isaacs Lowe

CAP_84483_8

As we work to build a Culture of Health for all Americans, it is time to end the stigmatizing distinctions between mental and physical health. After all, the brain and the body are in constant contact, and affect the well-being of each other in too many ways to count. A true Culture of Health recognizes the interdependence of mental and physical health, and places a premium on prevention and early detection of illness, regardless of type.

We commonly provide preemptive treatment or suggest early lifestyle changes for people at risk for diabetes before the condition evolves into full-blown disease. Yet, we typically don’t approach care for serious mental illness in the same way. It’s time for that to change.

The results from a recently released national study of the Early Detection and Intervention for the Prevention of Psychosis Program (EDIPPP), a project RWJF funded between 2006 and 2013, demonstrate that early intervention to prevent the onset or progression of psychosis in teenagers and young adults improves health and well-being. By helping family members, pediatricians, teachers, young people, and other community members identify young people experiencing early symptoms of serious mental health problems, EDIPPP was able to engage and treat these young people early. That early intervention in turn helped them stay in school, remain employed, and maintain vital connections to family and friends. These benefits mitigated the effects of mental illness, and allowed these teens and young adults to lead healthier and more productive lives.

This study should shift our thinking about how we best treat young people at high risk of serious mental illness. It should also remind us to look at good health and good health practices through a much broader lens, because building a Culture of Health means finding and sharing solutions, and celebrating signs of progress.

Read a Washington Post article on the program

Read a first-person post about depression and the best way to support those who are suffering with it

Read a post by Brent Thompson on bipolar disorder and the death of a friend

Exactly How Much DOES That Appendectomy Cost?

Aug 1, 2014, 4:29 PM, Posted by Andrea Ducas

L1031049

Want to know one of health care’s dirty little secrets? While we know how much the country spends on care each year, we have little understanding of what it actually costs to provide care.

Think, for example, about an appendectomy. What does it really “cost” the health care system to perform that procedure? The answer is complex, and of course it includes everyone’s time—from the surgeon to housekeeping staff—and it also includes the drugs, equipment, space, and overhead associated with your stay.

The cost of your visit will also depend on who is delivering your care. A consult with a registered nurse (RN) is less costly to the hospital than one with a physician.

Then, consider insurance. If the price your carrier pays for that RN consult is $85, but the price another carrier pays is only $65, what does it actually cost the hospital—and how do those variances affect what you pay both out-of-pocket and for insurance premiums? Moreover, health care providers are currently not trained to think about the costs of the care they provide—and often have no incentive or means to even consider those costs.

These complexities have made it difficult to reform the way we purchase and pay for health care.

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