Gary L. Freed, MD, MPH

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar, 1990-1992

    • January 24, 2013

Position: Professor, Department of Health Management and Policy,
Director, Division of General Pediatrics
The Percy and Mary Murphy Professor of Pediatrics and Child Health Delivery
University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor

Clinical Scholar: 1990–1992, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Medical School

Research Project: "Adoption of a New HIB Vaccine Recommendation for Pediatricians" and "Physician Response to a Universal Hepatitis B Vaccine Recommendation for Infants"

Clinical Specialty: Pediatrics

Gary Freed joined the faculty of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine from 1992 to 1994 after being a Clinical Scholar there and was a member of the Clinical Scholars Program core faculty until leaving to join the Michigan faculty in 1998. He has done research and published in several areas of pediatric policy, but has continued to be particularly active in research related to the analysis of childhood immunization policy and practices. Among issues he has examined are the financial issues surrounding delivery of childhood immunization services, and whether government vaccine programs affect child vaccination services and physician behavior.

I first heard about the Clinical Scholars program from a faculty member at Baylor College of Medicine who was a former scholar at UNC. We had a conversation about my interest in the bigger pictures of health care and population-based issues of health care, instead of individually-based health care. I took an elective with him, and I applied to the Clinical Scholars program because it seemed to me to open a window to a whole new world of research.

The most important courses I took as a scholar were those in health economics and medical sociology. Not only was it relevant to my research interests, both then and now, but Bob Conrad and Gordon DeFriese, my two most important mentors, were both medical sociologists at the UNC Sheps Center for Health Services Research.