Dec 6 2013
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Public Health News Roundup: December 6

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CDC: Measles Remains a Threat to U.S. Health Security
Fifty years after the creation of the measles vaccine, the disease continues to be a very real public health threat both in the United States and globally, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). While a recent study in JAMA Pediatrics confirmed U.S. measles elimination starting in 2000 and sustained through 2011, international travel means people from countries where the disease persists could still bring it to the United States. Approximately 158,000 globally died from measles in 2011, with an average of 430 children dying each day. These facts illustrate the need to be vigilant in reporting suspected cases to public health departments. “The steady arrival of measles in the United States is a constant reminder that deadly diseases are testing our health security every day,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH. “Someday, it won’t be only measles at the international arrival gate; so, detecting diseases before they arrive is a wise investment in U.S. health security.” Read more on infectious disease.

HHS: $55.5M to Strengthen Training of U.S. Health Professionals, Especially in Nursing
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has announced the planned investment of millions to strengthen training for health professionals and add more professionals to the U.S. health care workforce, with a clear emphasis on nursing workforce development. About $45.4 million of the $55.5 million in FY 2013 will go toward nursing, including adding to the number of nurse faculty ($22.1 million), improving nurse diversity ($5.2 million), promoting interprofessional collaborative practice ($6.7 million) and supporting nursing education ($9.2 million). The more than 270 grants will also deal with overall public health, behavioral health and dentistry. Read more on nursing.

Switching to a Healthy Diet Adds About $1.50 Daily to Food Costs
Switching to a healthier may lighten your wallet a bit, but not so much that it isn’t worth it, according to a new study in the journal BMJ Open. Looking at 27 studies in 10 countries, researchers found that a diet that emphasizes fruits, vegetables, nuts and fish will add about $1.50 per day, or $550 per year, to an individual’s food budget. Healthy proteins such as boneless, skinless chicken breast were behind most of the additional costs. While this difference could be an issue for low-income families, middle-class families shouldn’t see much of a problem in making the healthy switch, according to study author Mayuree Rao, a junior research fellow in the department of epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. "$1.50 is about the price of a cup of coffee and really just a drop in the bucket when you consider the billions of dollars spent every year on diet-related chronic diseases." Read more on nutrition.

Tags: Global Health, Infectious disease, News roundups, Nutrition, Public health