Category Archives: Prevention

Apr 9 2014
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National Public Health Week: ‘Get Out Ahead’

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NewPublicHealth continues its coverage of National Public Health Week with today’s theme—“Get Out Ahead” on prevention.

According to the American Public Health Association (APHA), seven in 10 deaths in the United States are related to preventable diseases such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and cancer. And while 75 percent of U.S. health care dollars are spent treating such diseases, only 3 percent of health care dollars go toward prevention.

The APHA says there are now more options than ever when it comes to preventive health measures and that public health and clinical health professionals must work collaboratively to help individuals identify and pursue the best preventative health options.

A strong way to help prevent disease and premature death is to add health observance dates such as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and National HIV Testing Day to personal and community calendars.

Healthfinder.gov, a website from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, lists health observance days, weeks and months which can steer people toward information and resources. Health observances often include community screenings such as blood pressure and cholesterol checks, making it easy to have those tests on a weekend in your neighborhood. Those checks include resources guiding people to community care if tests show a potential health problem.

A critical observance in April is Alcoholism Awareness Month. Decades of data shows that drinking too much alcohol increases people’s risk of health-related injuries, violence, drowning, liver disease and some types of cancer.

Actions communities are taking in observance of Alcoholism Awareness Month include:

  • Partnering with a local high school or youth organization to host an event about alcohol abuse prevention.
  • Alcohol-free community block parties.
  • Many local health clinics will offer free or low-cost screenings for alcohol abuse on National Alcohol Screening Day (April 11).

Many police stations are hosting Family Information Nights about the dangers of drinking and driving. Activities include special goggles that let kids and teens see how drinking can impact their vision behind the wheel.

Mar 17 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: March 17

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Poison Prevention Week 2014
March 16-24 is Poison Prevention Week this year, and an important opportunity to remind health officials and consumers about the resources provided by the National Poison Prevention Program and Hotline (1-800-222-1222). The National Poison Control Program is a program of the Health Resource Services Administration (HRSA). Programs include:

  • Poison centers serving all states, Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia, Guam, the Federated States of Micronesia and American Samoa.
  • A single, national toll-free number (1-800-222-1222) that connects callers with the poison center serving their area.
  • A nationwide media campaign to educate the public and health care providers about poison prevention, poison center services and the 1-800 number.
  • Programs to support the enhancement and improvement of poison education, prevention and treatment.
  • Partnership development with other federal agencies and national organizations to advance poison prevention awareness.
  • Development of uniform patient management guidelines so that poison centers can provide uniform treatment recommendations.
  • Improvement of data collection systems and toxic exposure surveillance for enhanced capability to capture national poisoning data.
  • Multilingual interpreter service in 161 languages to anyone who calls the 1-800 number. 

Read an FAQ on assistance available from the Poison Prevention Program for consumers and health providers. Read more on prevention.

Colon Cancer Incidence Rates Decreasing Steeply in Older Americans
Colon cancer incidence rates have dropped 30 percent in the United States in the last 10 years among adults 50 and older because of the widespread use of colonoscopies, according to a new study in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. The largest decrease has been in people over age 65. Colonoscopy use has almost tripled among adults ages 50-75, from 19 percent in 2000 to 55 percent in 2010. The study relied on data from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Program of Cancer Registries.

The "larger declines among Medicare-eligible seniors likely reflect higher rates of screening because of universal insurance coverage," according to the study authors. Mortality rates from colon cancer have also declined most rapidly within the past decade. From 2001 to 2010, death rates from colon cancer decreased by approximately 3 percent per year in both men and women, compared with declines of approximately 2 percent per year during the 1990s. The data is being released as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services launches a nationwide effort to increase colorectal cancer screening rates to 80 percent by 2018. Read more on cancer.

DOT Proposed Rules on Electronic Log Books for Large and Bus Drivers to Help Reduce Fatalities and Injuries
The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) has announced a proposal to require interstate commercial truck and bus companies to use Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs) in their vehicles to improve compliance with the safety rules that govern the number of hours a driver can work. According to DOT, the proposed rule will ultimately reduce hours-of-service violations by making it more difficult for drivers to misrepresent their time on logbooks and—significantly—help reduce crashes by fatigued drivers and prevent approximately 20 fatalities and 434 injuries each year, for an annual safety benefit of $394.8 million. Impaired driving, including fatigue, was a factor in more than 12 percent of the 129,120 total crashes that involved large trucks or buses in 2012. Read more on injury prevention.

Mar 12 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: March 12

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Robert Wood Johnson and CDC Foundations Launch New Project on Using Law and Policies to Help People Make Healthier Choices
The Robert Wood Johnson and CDC Foundations have announced the launch of a new project to advance discussion about how laws and policies can assist people in making healthier choices. Subject matter experts will work with federal partners to develop 10 to 15 evidence-based reports during the next three years to highlight laws and policies related to specific topic areas within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Healthy People 2020 initiative. Healthy People 2020 is a set of goals and objectives with 10-year targets designed to guide national health promotion and disease prevention efforts aimed at improving the health of all people in the United States.

The new project, which will be led by the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) at HHS, will provide practical information to public health officials and associations; health-related industries; legal practitioners; non-profit organizations; policymakers; and individuals about the use of law and policy to address health factors:

  • ODPHP will provide leadership and support for the development of the reports.
  • CDC will provide technical guidance on the development of specific reports and collaborate with public health partners and communities to promote knowledge and understanding of the reports.
  • RWJF will provide public health law and policy expertise.
  • The CDC Foundation will manage administration and implementation of the project and amplify the results to stakeholders through communications efforts.

“The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation believes that law and policy are important levers for building a culture of health in our nation,” said Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. “We’re pleased to collaborate with leaders in public health and government to focus attention on policies based on the best science to help achieve the national health goals set out in Healthy People 2020—strategies that all states and communities can use to help people live healthier lives.” Read more on prevention.

FDA Approves Marketing of First Migraine Prevention Device
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has authorized the marketing of the first device designed to stop migraine headaches before they happen. The preventative treatment is a small, portable prescription device that uses an electrical current to stimulate branches of the trigeminal nerve, which has been associated with migraine headaches. An estimated 10 percent of people suffer from migraines, which if untreated can last from four to 72 hours and lead to nausea, vomiting and sensitivity to light and sound. In a release, Christy Foreman, director of the Office of Device Evaluation at the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said Cefaly “may help patients who cannot tolerate current migraine medications for preventing migraines or treating attacks.” Read more on technology.

HHS: 4.2 Million Have Signed Up for Coverage Under the Affordable Care Act
Just a few weeks before the final deadline of March 31, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has announced that more than 4.2 million people have enrolled in the Health Insurance Marketplace under the Affordable Care Act. Approximately 943,000 enrolled in February. Of the 4,242,300 who have enrolled:

  • 55 percent are female and 45 percent are male;
  • 31 percent are age 34 and under;
  • 25 percent are between the ages of 18 and 34;
  • 63 percent selected a Silver plan (up one percentage point over the prior reporting period), while 18 percent selected a Bronze plan (down one point)
  • 83 percent selected a plan and are eligible to receive Financial Assistance (up one point)

Read more on the Affordable Care Act.

Feb 27 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: February 27

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FDA Proposes New ‘Nutrition Facts’ Food Labels
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has put forth a new proposed Nutrition Facts label for packaged foods. The updated design would reflect scientific information not available when the current label was designed two decades ago. For example, it would replace out-of-date serving sizes and feature a design that highlights key parts of the label, such as calories and serving sizes.  “For 20 years consumers have come to rely on the iconic nutrition label to help them make healthier food choices,” said FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, MD. “To remain relevant, the FDA’s newly proposed Nutrition Facts label incorporates the latest in nutrition science as more has been learned about the connection between what we eat and the development of serious chronic diseases impacting millions of Americans.” Read more on nutrition.

Study: One in Five U.S. Health Facilities Don’t Provide Hand Sanitizer Everywhere Needed
One in five U.S. health facilities don’t make hand sanitizer available everywhere necessary, needlessly increasing the risk for health-care associated infections, according to a new study in the American Journal of Infection Control. In addition, approximately half of the hospitals, ambulatory care facilities and long-term care facilities included in their budgets funds for proper hand hygiene training. The study examine compliance with the World Health Organization’s hand hygiene guidelines at 168 facilities in 42 states and Puerto Rico. "When hospitals don't focus heavily on hand hygiene, that puts patients at unnecessary risk for preventable health care-associated infections," said by Laurie Conway, RN, MS, CIC, PhD student at Columbia Nursing, in a release. "The tone for compliance with infection control guidelines is set at the highest levels of management, and our study also found that executives aren't always doing all that they can to send a clear message that preventing infections is a priority." Read more on infectious disease.

CDC Foundation Expands Safe Injection Campaign
The CDC Foundation and Eli Lilly are partnering to expand the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Safe Injection Practices Coalition—a safety awareness campaign that provides information for health providers and patients. According to CDC data, more than 150,000 patients have been notified of potential exposure to hepatitis and HIV because of unsafe injection practices in U.S. health care settings since 2001, and CDC researchers have found that medical injections are an overlooked source of infections and outbreaks. Planned actives of the partnership include:

  • Expand  the One & Only Campaign to new audiences such as individual and group-owned physician practices
  • Educate health care providers through new and enhanced training and communication materials to address emerging issues
  • Improve the Safe Injection Practices Coalition website and social media platforms to share resources and toolkits with new audiences
  • Engage new and existing Safe Injection Practices Coalition partners

Read more on prevention.

Feb 25 2014
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A New Infographic for the National Prevention Strategy

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A new infographic from the Office of the U.S. Surgeon General highlights collaborations within the federal government and between the health and healthcare sectors to help improve prevention outreach. These efforts are part of the cross sector National Prevention Strategy launched by the office several years ago.

Current examples of collaboration include Million Hearts, an initiative of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to prevent one million heart attacks by 2017. The initiative includes a commitment by close to 150 large private medical practices in the United States to get hypertension control rates above 80 percent in their communities.

You can also view the fully interactive infographic here.

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>>Bonus Link: Read interviews and listen to podcasts about the National Prevention Strategy conducted with former and current U.S. Cabinet Secretaries and agency heads.

Feb 24 2014
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IOM Report: More Evidence-Based Practices Needed to Help Treat and Prevent Psychological Disorders among Service Members and Families

Between 2000 and 2011, almost 1 million service members or former service members were diagnosed with at least one psychological disorder either during or after deployment, according to recent research by the Institute of Medicine (IOM). As a follow up, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) asked the IOM to evaluate the department’s efforts to prevent psychological disorders among active-duty service members and their families. That report was recently released.

The report includes recommendations on how the DOD can improve care.

Finding 1: DOD has implemented numerous resilience and prevention programs for service members and their families, but it faces a number of challenges, including an insufficient evidence base to support its interventions and a lack of systematic evaluation and performance measures.

Recommendation 1: By targeting resources to develop the evidence base and disseminate that evidence, DOD’s prevention efforts can be both more effective and cost effective.

Finding 2: There is a need for DOD to improve approaches for identifying and intervening with service members and their members who may already have or may be at risk for developing a psychological disorder.

Recommendation 2: DOD should dedicate funding, staffing and logistical support for data analysis and evaluation to support performance monitoring of programs for accountability and continuous improvement.

Finding 3: Screening, assessment and treatment approaches for psychological health problems are not always implemented between and within the DOD and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) in a consistent manner or aligned with the evidence base, which threatens the delivery of high-quality care and hampers evaluation efforts.

Recommendation 3:

  • There are opportunities to improve processes of training and evaluating clinicians, including the incorporation of continuing education and supervision; standardized periodic evaluation; and a greater emphasis on coordination and interdisciplinarity.
  • The DOD and VA should invest in research to determine the efficacy of treatments that do not have a strong evidence base.
  • Both departments should conduct systematic assessments to determine whether screening and treatment interventions are being implemented according to clinical guidelines and departmental policy.
  • Accessible inter-department data systems should be developed to assess treatment outcomes, variations among treatment facilities and barriers to the use of evidence-based treatment.

>>Bonus Links:

  • Read the complete report.
  • Read a NewPublicHealth interview with Jonathan Woodson, MD, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs about the National Prevention Strategy.
  • Learn more about the state of mental health in the military from this infographic from the American Psychiatric Association embedded below.
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Feb 21 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: February 21

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HHS, Heart Disease Organizations Join Forces to Vastly Reduce Premature Death Linked to Heart Conditions by 2025
Leaders from the World Heart Federation , the American Heart Association, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the American College of Cardiology are joining together to help cut premature mortality from cardiovascular disease by at least 25 percent by 2025.
 Key strategies will include secondary prevention efforts for people who have already experienced a heart incident, or have established heart disease, as well as primary prevention strategies in the United States and around the world. “Heart disease can touch anyone, no matter where you live,” said Nancy Brown, chief executive officer of the American Heart Association.  “It will take the collective efforts of everyone from community leaders to healthcare professionals, educators and business leaders to stop this No. 1 killer at the national and global level...” Read more on heart health.

New Guidelines for Stroke Risk, Prevention in Women
The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association has published the first ever set of guidelines dedicated to stroke risk and prevention in women. The 86-page document appears in the journal Stroke and address risk factors distinct to women, including pregnancy, oral contraceptives, menopause and hormone replacement. It also covers factors that affect women more than men, including atrial fibrillation and migraine with aura. “We reviewed a large body of research to be able to summarize our current understanding of stroke risk and stroke prevention in women, information that is critically important for care providers and researchers in the field,” according to Judith Lichtman, MD, associate professor at the Yale School of Public Health and co-author of the study. “The guidelines are also important to empower women and their families to better understand their risk for stroke and be aware of ways they can minimize their likelihood of having a one.” Strokes are the third-leading cause of death among women in the United States. Read more on strokes.

Study: Indicators of Potential Heart Disease as Early as Age 18
Indicators of potential heart disease can be seen as early as age 18, according to a long-term study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Researchers found that elevated blood pressure at that age, as well as found distinct blood pressure patterns from ages 18-55, indicate people at high risk for calcification of coronary arteries by middle age. “This shows that your blood pressure in young adulthood can impact your risk for heart disease later in life,” said Norrina Allen, PhD, lead study author and assistant professor of Preventive Medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in a release. “We can’t wait until middle age to address it. If we can prevent their blood pressure from increasing earlier in life we can reduce their risk of future heart attacks and stroke.” Approximately one in three U.S. adults have hypertension. Read more on prevention.

Feb 13 2014
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What Will It Really Take to Improve the Nation's Health?

“Building a culture of health means recognizing that while Americans’ economic, geographic, or social circumstances may differ, we all aspire to lead the best lives that we can,” wrote Robert Wood Johnson Foundation president and CEO Risa Lavizzo-Mourrey, MD, MBA in her 2014 President’s Message, released earlier this week. Laying out the plans for achieving those goals, Lavizzo-Mourrey added: “for the Foundation, it also means informing the dialogue and building demand for health by pursuing new partnerships, creating new networks to build momentum, and standing on the shoulders of others also striving to make America a healthier nation.”

The Foundation’s wide-ranging plans to “inform the dialogue” included a plenary talk by Mark McClellan, co-chair of the RWJF Commission to Build a Healthier America, and a former head of both the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. McClellan spoke at the AcademyHealth National Health Policy Conference in Washington, D.C., last week — less than a month after the release of the Commission’s 2014 report.

“To become healthier and reduce the growth of public and private spending on medical care, we must create a seismic shift in how we approach health and the actions we take,” said McClellan, “As a country, we need to expand our focus to address how to stay healthy in the first place.”

McClellan told a very attentive audience that critical needed changes include:

  • Improve opportunities [for people] to make healthy decisions where we live, learn, work and play
  • Improve access to a good education, jobs and health care
  • Work across sectors, collaborating to improve the health of all Americans
  • Make investing in America’s youngest children a high priority
  • Fundamentally change how we revitalize neighborhoods, fully integrating health into community development
  • Adopt new health “vital signs” to assess non-medical indicators for health such as jobs, income, housing, transportation and access to healthy food.
  • Create incentives tied to reimbursement for health professionals and health care institutions to address non-medical factors that affect health.

McClellan cited two examples of organizations that are addressing issues beyond healthcare in order to improve health:

  • Health Leads, a national health care organization, enables physicians and other health professionals to systematically screen patients for food, heat, and other basic resources that patients need to be healthy and “prescribe” these resources for patients.
  • The Medical-Legal Partnership program removes legal barriers that impede health for low-income populations by integrating legal professionals into the care team. These volunteers intervene with landlords, social service agencies, and others to address health-harming conditions ranging from lack of utilities to bedbugs to mold in rental properties.

>>Bonus Links:

Jan 28 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: January 28

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Obese Children More Susceptible to Air Pollution-Related Asthma
Obese children are more susceptible to air pollution-related asthma, according to a new study in the journal Environmental Research. Researchers followed the health of 311 children, ages 5 and 6, in predominantly Dominican and African-American neighborhoods of New York City, finding that high exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)—a family of air pollutants—was only associated with asthma among obese children The study determined that obese children exposed to the PAH chemicals 1-methylphenanthrene and 9- methylphenanthrene were two to three times more likely to have asthma. PAHs are emitted by vehicles, cigarette smoke, cooking, incense, burning candles and various other indoor sources. Two possible explanations for the disparity are that obese children tend to be less active, so are more likely to be exposed to indoors sources of PAH, and that they may breathe more rapidly than children of healthier weights Better understanding of the risk factors opens the door to more targeted interventions. “These findings suggest that we may be able to bring down childhood asthma rates by curbing indoor, as well as outdoor, air pollution and by implementing age-appropriate diet and exercise programs,” said senior author Rachel Miller, MD, professor of medicine (in pediatrics) and environmental health sciences, and co-deputy director of the Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health at the Mailman School of Public Health. Read more on pediatrics.

Report: Antibiotics Dangerous to Humans Still Used in Livestock
Despite knowing their risk to humans, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) continues to allow the use of certain antibiotics as additives in animal feed and water, according to a new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council based on documents acquired under the Freedom of Information Act. In a review from 2001 to 2010 the FDA concluded that 30 such antibiotics posed a significant risk of exposing people to antibiotic- resistance bacteria. The drugs were approved for “non-therapeutic” use in farm animals, such as preventing disease or promoting growth of the animals, instead of treating specific illnesses. In December the FDA announced its intention to combat the spread of antibacterial resistance by prohibiting the use of medically important antimicrobials in food animals for food production purposes, while also adding veterinary oversight to therapeutic use of the drugs in animals. Read more on food safety.

Residents of Public Housing Developments, Rental Assistance Units See Significant Gap in Oral Health Care
People who live in public housing developments and rental assistance units are less likely to have routine preventive dental care and more likely to have suffered serious oral health issues related to tooth loss, according to a new study in The Journal of Urban Health. The study was conducted by the Partners in Health and Housing Prevention Research Center (PHH-PRC) at the Boston University School of Public Health. The researchers looked at four indicators for people living in Boston’s publicly supported housing: having had a dental visit in the last year, having had a dental cleaning in the last year, having had six or more teeth extracted, and having dental insurance. They found that people in public housing, despite being as likely to have had a dental visit in the past year, were significantly less likely to have had a cleaning. The gap in health care is especially serious for the seniors in this already vulnerable population: Compared to younger residents, seniors 65-75 years old were 30 times as likely to have had six or more teeth removed. Read more on prevention.

Dec 9 2013
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NewPublicHealth Q&A: John Auerbach and Cheryl Bartlett on the Massachusetts Prevention and Wellness Trust

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The Massachusetts Prevention and Wellness Trust is a four-year, $60 million project designed to support prevention and health-promotion activities in the state. The first project of its kind in the United States will fund six to 12 collaborative initiatives, and partners on the initiative will include municipalities, community-based organizations, health care providers, regional agencies and health plans. Information on the Trust is detailed in a new report prepared by the Institute on Urban Health Research and Practice at Northeastern University and funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

The vision behind the creation of the project is to give all Massachusetts residents the opportunity to live in communities that promote health, as well as seamless access to all community and clinical services needed to prevent and control chronic diseases. It was created because while there is access to health insurance and health care in Massachusetts, health costs continue to rise. The goals of the project include:

  • Reducing the rate of the state’s most costly preventable health conditions
  • Reducing health disparities
  • Increasing healthy behaviors
  • Increasing the adoption of workplace wellness programs
  • Developing a strong evidence base of effective prevention programs

In order to implement these goals, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health identified four priority areas: tobacco use, childhood asthma, hypertension and elder falls prevention—all of which should be considered closely when working to reduce health disparities and co-occurring mental health conditions in these areas.

Massmodel Detailed look at a section of the new infographic

A new infographic created for the Prevention and Wellness Trust’s inauguration perfectly illustrates how community links work together to improve health under the principles of the Trust. For example, a diagnosis of hypertension would need a provider to prescribe medications, but the obesity and exercise needs that would also improve the condition for many patients requires input from other community entities, including:

  • Classes in exercise, medication and stress reduction by community agencies
  • Chronic disease self management classes and home visits for medication use instruction by a community agency
  • A neighborhood policy that provides support for transportation changes to encourage walking or biking and zoning for healthy food stores
  • A neighborhood policy that provides support for more accessible recreation options in parks and city centers for increased stress reduction
  • Workplace policies that provide support for workplace wellness programs that help provide and encourage exercise, healthy foods and stress reduction

NewPublicHealth recently spoke with John Auerbach, a Professor at Northeastern University and the primary author of a report on the Trust, and Cheryl Bartlett, public health commissioner of Massachusetts and the lead person charged with its implementation.

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