Category Archives: APHA

Nov 25 2013
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Recommended Reading: Q&A with APHA President-elect Shiriki Kumanyika

Today is Public Health Thank You Day 2013, when Research!America and other leading public health organizations recognize the public health professionals working to improve health where we all live, learn, work and play.

Among the biggest names in public health at the moment is Shiriki Kumanyika, PhD, MPH, a University of Pennsylvania professor who earlier this month became the president-elect of the American Public Health Association (APHA). In a recent Q&A on APHA’s Public Health Newswire blog, Kumanyika spoke about the overall landscape of public health and gave her thoughts on particular issues.

One of the big takeaways from the APHA annual meeting earlier this month—where she was named president-elect—was how APHA is shifting its focus to concentrate more on being an action- and goal-oriented organization, according to Kumanyika.

“We are going to be more convincing about the importance of a focus on prevention and wellness, while making better use of scientific evidence and creating a greater sense of urgency around health equity issues,” she said. “I think that, over time, this new positioning in the public arena will really enhance the sense of community among our thousands of diverse members, attract more members and align our combined efforts for greater overall impact.”

Kumanyika also has particular ideas on the greatest opportunities for improving health in African-American communities, especially when it comes to nutrition and obesity prevention. Not only are unhealthy foods too easily available in the average black community but, when compared to other communities, the situation is even more troubling, with black communities seeing more advertising for unhealthy food. The answer is targeted efforts to promote healthier alternatives.

However, she also noted how food and nutrition present their own particular public health obstacles.

“Food is a particularly complex area; we can’t treat it like tobacco and tell people to avoid it altogether. The changes we need are more complicated and will have huge implications across the spectrum from agriculture to environmental sustainability,” she said. “We have to make both a public health case and a business case for a healthier food supply and for marketing healthier foods and beverages. We have a tremendous opportunity to make progress that will change the food and health landscape for the population at large if we do our health diplomacy well.”

Read the full interview on Public Health Newswire here.

Nov 11 2013
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What's New in Schools and Programs of Public Health? Q&A with Harrison Spencer

Harrison Spencer, Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (image courtesy of Tulane University)

The Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH), like the American Public Health Association, held its annual meeting in Boston last week. NewPublicHealth spoke with Harrison Spencer, MD, MPH, executive director of the ASPPH, from Boston about the meeting and what’s ahead for students of public health.

NewPublicHealth: How was the meeting and what were some of the key sessions?

Harrison Spencer: Our meeting this year was the first one held since we formed our new organization, the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health, on August 1. The new organization is now comprised of all accredited public health academic institutions, both schools and programs. We’ve got 93 members now, an increase from 57 members before, so this was a wonderful and exciting and dynamic annual meeting with lots of energy and lots of promise.

Among the highlights were Harvey Fineberg, MD, PhD, president of the Institute of Medicine, who gave us an inspirational talk about public health leadership, and Laura Liswood, Secretary General of the Council of Women World Leaders, who led a discussion on diversity as a way to make organizations and institutes stronger.   

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Nov 11 2013
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Ending Healthcare Waste, Improving Healthy Lives: Q&A with the L.A. Department of Public Health’s Jonathan Fielding

In a report released last year, the Institute of Medicine found that the United States wastes billions of dollars each year on such unnecessary spending as inefficiently delivered services, excess administrative costs, fraud and missed prevention opportunities. In response, a group of senior public health scholars at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, led by Jonathan Fielding, MD, MPH, a professor at the school and the director of the Los Angeles Department of Public Health, published an article in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine on the improvements to population health the country might realize if only the wasted money was devoted instead to the social and environmental determinants of health. If the government could reap 45 percent of the wasted medical care costs, argues Fielding and his co-authors, and invested those resources in sectors such as education, jobs, healthier foods and transportation infrastructure, the health of millions could be markedly improved and society would see additional social benefits.

Jim Marks, Senior Vice President and Director, Health Group at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation echoed this approach at the recent American Public Health Association (APHA) annual meeting in Boston.

"We know lots about the cost of illness, but very little about the value of health,” he said.

Marks also said that focusing on health as the ultimate goal tends to eclipse some of the social determinants that can have enormous impact on people’s lives. “Most people don’t want good health as their outcome, they want a quality life. They want to travel, take care of grandkids, have a rich family and social life—you can only do that if you’re healthy,” said Marks. “It’s unrelated to good quality medical care. It’s related to education, safe neighborhoods, [and other social factors].”

According to Marks, improving public health isn’t about curing individual diseases or fixing specific injuries. Rather, it’s about everything; the diseases are the end result of the system we live in. And with all the data we have available, we know it’s a system that needs fixing, said Marks.

Marks’ thoughts came at an APHA panel Fielding moderated in a closing day session about the health impact of investment in major social and environmental policies and interventions; information gaps and how they can be filled; and how the discussion of health spending can be re-framed so that U.S. resources can be invested most productively.

NewPublicHealth spoke with Fielding about better uses for the wasted health care spending just before the start of the APHA meeting.

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Nov 8 2013
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Recommended Reading: An Introduction to 'Health-in-All-Policies'

A session on health in all policies at the American Public Health Association (APHA) meeting in Boston gave prominent attention to a newly released publication on the topic: An Introduction to Health in All Policies: A Guide for State and Local Governments. The guide was issued collaboratively by APHA, the California Endowment, the California Department of Health and the Public Health Institute.

It was released last month and is geared, according to its authors, “toward state and local government leaders who want to use intersectoral collaboration to promote healthy environments.”

The guide includes a history of health in all policies, case studies, a glossary, messaging, resources and a list of critical thinking questions. It draws heavily on the experiences of the California Health in All Policies Task Force, which was created in 2010 by an executive order of the governor and grew out of a common interest among several California agencies in climate change, health and childhood obesity. The task force brings together non-government stakeholders and local government representatives in its “health-in-all-policies” work through workshops, meetings and opportunities for public comment and testimony.

The Guide emphasizes that there is no one “right” way to implement a health-in-all-policies approach, but puts forward five key elements:

  • Promote health, equity and sustainability
  • Support for Intersectoral collaboration
  • Benefit multiple partners
  • Engage stakeholders
  • Create structural or procedural change

>>Bonus Links:

  • Health Impact Assessments (HIA) are one of the key tools addressed in the new Guide. See a regularly updated map on HIAs in the United States created by the Health Impact Project, a collaboration of the Pew Charitable Trusts and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
  • HIA was front and center at the American Public Health Association meeting, with more than thirty presentations this week. Read a summary of the HIAs discussed at the meeting, prepared by the Health Impact Project.

>>NewPublicHealth was on the ground throughout the APHA conference speaking to public health leaders and presenters, hearing from attendees on the ground and providing updates from sessions, with a focus on how we can build a culture of health. Find the complete coverage here.

Nov 8 2013
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APHA 2013: Update on Public Health Department Accreditation

A full house of American Public Health Association (APHA) annual meeting attendees got an update on health department accreditation this week from Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) president and CEO Kaye Bender, RN, PHD, FAAN; board chair Carol Moehrle; and vice chair Leslie Beitsch, MD, JD. Right now, Moehrle told the crowd, 19 health departments—local, state and tribal—have been granted the credential and more than 200 departments are in various stages of their applications.

Moehrle gave some “heads–ups” on what’s upcoming for accreditation in 2014, including revised application standards and measures—called version 1.5—as well as the establishment of several additional PHAB think tanks to help expand the issues health departments are asked about when they apply for accreditation. Information from the previous think tanks informed the development of the Guide to Public Health Department Accreditation Version 1.0 and the PHAB Standards and Measures Version 1.0. New topics for PHAB think tanks will include the U.S. Army.

Moehrle also announced that the new version will be released on the PHAB website in January 2014, and those new standards and measures become effective for health departments' seeking accreditation beginning on July 1, 2014. To apply under the 1.0 version, health departments must submit their application by 11:59 PM Eastern Time on June 2, 2014.

Moehrle said that PHAB is recommending that health departments review the proposed changes to the standards and measures before they automatically decide that they will apply under Version 1.0, because version 1.5 is designed to “enhance, strengthen, expand, and clarify the Standards and Measures document,” including the following:

  • Number of examples needed and timeframes for required documentation
  • Edits to version 1.0 for clarity and consistency, based on frequently asked questions from applying health departments
  • New measures and revised content to advance public health practice based on suggestions from PHAB Think Tanks conducted on special topics, including health equity, communication science, public health informatics, public health ethics, public health workforce and emergency preparedness

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Nov 7 2013
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Social Media and Hurricane Sandy: Q&A with Jay Dempsey and Vivi Abrams Siegel

Hurricane Sandy made landfall last year during the American Public Health Association’s (APHA) annual meeting in San Francisco. Several sessions at the annual meeting this year in Boston, one year after the storm, focused on the response during the hurricane that killed dozens, injured hundreds and destroyed thousands of homes.

In a key session Monday, communications specialists from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported on a study of new media preparedness and response messaging implemented before and after the disaster. As Hurricane Sandy approached landfall, the CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) assisted state and local public health partners by developing and sharing storm-related messaging across several social media channels, including an SMS text subscription service to directly reach people affected by the storm.

CDC determined what topics would need coverage each day, ranging from preparing for the storm's arrival to post-storm safety and clean-up. Once messages were posted, they were retweeted across several CDC Twitter feeds and on social media channels of local health departments. The recent CDC study found that leveraging social media turned out to be very important for driving a steady increase in traffic to CDC emergency response web pages. For example, a message about safe clean-up of mold produced 14,881 visits. The number of NCEH Twitter followers also increased—there were 4,226 twitter followers at the beginning of October before the storm, and that grew to 5,215 followers—a 23 percent increase—once the storm hit.

>>NewPublicHealth was on the ground throughout the APHA conference speaking to public health leaders and presenters, hearing from attendees on the ground and providing updates from sessions, with a focus on how we can build a culture of health. Find the complete coverage here.

Ahead of the APHA meeting, NewPublicHealth spoke with Jay Dempsey, a health communications specialist in the National Center for Environmental Health who presented the data at the APHA meeting and Vivi Abrams Siegel, a health communications specialist in the CDC Office of Public Health Preparedness and Emergency Response about the findings and the growing importance of social media before, during and immediately after disasters.

NewPublicHealth: What’s most important about the recent study on social media and disaster preparedness and response?

Jay Dempsey: The case study is an overview of the lessons that we learned from using social media to disseminate emergency and preparedness messaging ahead of and during and immediately following Hurricane Sandy. Some of the things that we knew going in during the response to Hurricane Sandy was that a growing number of people are using social media to get information just before and during a disaster or an emergency. So knowing that, we leveraged our social media channels and the first thing we saw was a pretty substantial increase in web traffic. We’re able to track the number of page visits that come exclusively from social media and make a determination of approximately how much social media drove traffic to those particular pages.

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Nov 7 2013
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Making a Collective Public Health Impact through Diverse Partnerships

It’s no secret that public health department budgets have been shrinking in the past few years. In the face of the recession, public health professionals must seek new and diverse partnerships in order to achieve greater impact despite the lack of funding. The topic of one session at the American Public Health Association (APHA) Annual Meeting held in Boston was just that—how to increase impact through strategic partnerships with unlikely partners.

“The need for austerity and efficiency opens up the conversation for collective impact,” said Joseph Schuchter of the University of California-Berkeley School of Public Health. Partnerships can include a wide array of non-public health entities, including non-profit organizations, businesses and schools. The APHA panel discussed different approaches to successful partnerships that advance public health programs.

Leadership Training

The Center for Health Leadership and Practice provides group leadership training for cross-sector teams that are working together to advance public health. “We may all be talking about the same thing, we’re just using different vocabulary and styles,” says VP of External Relations and Director Carmen Rita Nevarez. The Center provides existing partnerships with the tools and training needed to move forward in the same direction, while understanding that individual efforts may differ. More than 90 percent of program participants agree that the approach is effective in supporting intersectoral leadership development and most teams report regularly engaging other sectors as a result.

Networked and Entrepreneurial Approaches

Networked and entrepreneurial approaches to partnerships offer public health professionals with resources and allow them to reduce the negative externalities of the economy. The impact investment market constitutes an $8 billion industry that is eager to fund novel solutions to social problems. In order to succeed in these partnerships, the field of public health must work with social entrepreneurs and investors to highlight the potential return on investment for prevention programs and produce irrefutable outcomes.

Backbone Organizations

The Community Health Improvement Partners (CHIP) serves as a backbone organization for a larger, cross-sector childhood obesity initiative. Cheryl Moder of CHIP shared her insights into the role of such an organization and how to successfully grow a diverse partnership. A backbone organization must serve as mission leaders by recruiting and retaining partners and support aligned activities so that they connect to one another. In addition, backbone organizations must navigate the challenges of larger partnerships—such as developing and retaining trust, encouraging equal partner recognition and shared measurement and evaluation—in a way that suits the needs of partners from different sectors.

>>NewPublicHealth was on the ground throughout the APHA conference speaking to public health leaders and presenters, hearing from attendees on the ground and providing updates from sessions, with a focus on how we can build a culture of health. Find the complete coverage here.

Nov 6 2013
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Regulating Tobacco: Q&A with FDA's Mitch Zeller

Tobacco featured prominently as a public health issue at the American Public Health Association (APHA) meeting this week, including a regulatory update from Mitch Zeller, JD, who became director of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Center for Tobacco Products earlier this year. Zeller previously worked on tobacco issues in government as associate commissioner and director of FDA’s first Office of Tobacco Programs, and also as a U.S. delegate to the World Health Organization (WHO) Working Group for the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

NewPublicHealth spoke with Zeller ahead of the APHA meeting.

Mitch Zeller, JD, Director of the FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products

Mitch Zeller: I think most broadly my goals are to help give the center and the agency the greatest chance of fulfilling the public health mission behind the law passed in 2009 giving the Food and Drug Administration authority over tobacco. This really is an important piece of legislation. It’s really stunning that in 2013—with everything that we know about the harms associated with tobacco use—that it remains the leading cause of preventable death and disease both in this country and globally.

There are some very powerful tools that Congress has given FDA to use wisely and supported by evidence. That’s where I think, the greatest opportunity lies: to use the tools relying on regulatory science to try to protect consumers and reduce the death and disease toll from tobacco.

There are two areas where I think these tools can make a profound positive impact on public health. The first is something called product standards, which is basically the power to ban, restrict or limit the allowable levels of ingredients in tobacco or tobacco smoke. We are exploring potential product standards in three areas: toxicity, addiction and appeal. And we are funding research in all three areas and working very hard behind the scenes to find out what our options are for potential product standards in those three areas.

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Nov 6 2013
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The Connection Between High School Graduation and Health

“For too long, we’ve thought of health as something that happens to you in a doctor’s office,” explained Howard Koh, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Assistant Secretary for Health on Monday at the American Public Health Association (APHA) 2013 meeting. “We have about 20 leading health indicators that we look at closely, one of them is high school graduation.”

Koh went on to describe social efforts such as boosting graduation rates as among the most important things we can do to improve health for the future. He also discussed the important role that learning plays in being healthy—and that being healthy can also free kids up to focus and get a better education. The assistant secretary’s sentiments kicked off a panel on the indelible connection between the nation’s drop-out crisis and public health, and the ways in which we can achieve success in both.

Robert Balfanz of the Johns Hopkins School of Education began by describing the drop out epidemic: the overall graduation rate in the United States is as low as 78 percent and is far lower in some communities with the greatest inequities. In fact, one third of all schools produce 85 percent of the country’s drop outs. Chronic absenteeism, often related to student health, is the leading cause of the issue. For example, 25 percent of students in one city missed a year or more of schooling over a five-year period.

Health factors have a significant impact on academic success and graduation rates. According to Charles Basch of Teachers College at Columbia University, health issues such as poor vision, asthma and teen pregnancy inhibit student success, disproportionately so in children of urban, minority communities. Left unaddressed, these issues can form causal pathways to the increased likelihood of dropping out.

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Nov 6 2013
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Stakeholder Health: Q&A with Kimberlydawn Wisdom

Stakeholder Health, formerly known as the Health Systems Learning Group, is a learning collaborative made up of 43 organizations, including 36 nonprofit health systems, that have met for close to two years to share innovative practices aimed at improving health and economic viability of communities.

The idea for the learning collaborative came from a series of meetings at the White House Office and U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Centers for Faith-Based & Neighborhood Partnerships. The Stakeholder Health administrative team is based at Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare Center for Excellence in Faith and Health in Memphis, Tenn., and at Wake Forest Baptist Health System in Winston-Salem, N.C. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation provided a grant to share the group’s findings and lessons learned.

Earlier this year, Stakeholder Health released a monograph to help identify proven community health practices and partnerships. Kimberlydawn Wisdom, MD, MS, Senior Vice President of Community Health & Equity and Chief Wellness Officer at the Henry Ford Health System was a key contributor to the monograph.

NewPublicHealth recently spoke to Wisdom about Stakeholder Health’s objectives, goals and emerging successes, which she also presented on at the American Public Health Association’s annual meeting in Boston.

NewPublicHealth: What are examples of implementation of the Stakeholder Health recommendations at the Henry Ford Health System?

Kimberlydawn Wisdom: There are several. Stakeholder Health talks quite a bit about transformative partnerships and the importance of those transformative partnerships. And we have some stellar examples here in southeast Michigan of transformative partnerships, and one that I’d like to point to in particular is an effort we established called Sew Up the Safety Net, which addresses decreasing the infant mortality rate in our region, which is appallingly high.

We’ve developed a partnership with three other competing health systems within the Detroit region. So while on one level we are very strong competitors, on another level, we’ve actually joined our strategies and resources together in order to address the infant mortality challenge that we have in our communities. We also have private partners and public partners that are involved with us at various levels, but I think having that unprecedented partnership with competing health systems and getting real work done is something that we’re very proud of and work very hard to maintain.

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