Category Archives: Mental Health

Nov 13 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: November 13

More than 5,000 Lives Lost to Ebola So Far
Ebola has now killed at least 5,160 people and infected at least 14,098, mostly in West Africa, since the outbreak started last spring, according to the World Health Organization. New cases have increased sharply in Sierra Leone, while the incidence of new cases is declining in Guinea and Liberia. Read more on Ebola.

Seniors Need Resources Beyond the Internet for Health Information
Seniors are less likely than others to search for health informtion on the Internet, making it necessary for health providers to provide other health information resources, according to a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. The study found that while huge amounts of money and attention have been invested recently in health information technology in the United States—for example, by providing electronic medical records online—it’s unclear whether older patients are willing and able to use those for personal and general health information. The researchers analyzed data from the 2009 and 2010 Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative survey of more than 20,000 Americans 65 years and older. About 1,400 of the participants were asked how often they used the Internet in general and, in particular, how often they searched for health and medical information. Just over thirty percent used the Internet regularly and only 9.7 percent identified as having low health literacy used the internet at all. Read more on health literacy.

Predicting Which U.S. Soldiers Could Predict Suicide
A study that looked at predicting suicides in U.S. soldiers after hospitalization for a psychiatric disorder suggests that nearly 53 percent of post-hospital suicides occurred following the 5 percent of hospitalizations with the highest predicted suicide risk. The study, in JAMA Psychiatry, finds that the suicide rate in the U.S. Army has increased since 2004 and now exceeds the rate among civilians, and that a predictive model would help prevent some of the military suicides. The strongest predictors for suicide in this group include being male, late-age of enlistment, criminal offenses, weapons possession, prior suicidality, the number of antidepressant prescriptions filled in the previous year and psychiatric disorders diagnosed during the hospitalizations. Read more on mental health.

Oct 23 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: October 23

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EBOLA UPDATE: Drugmakers Seeking Indemnity to Protect Against Potential Losses, Claims
(NewPublicHealth is monitoring the public health crisis in West Africa.)
Drug manufacturers working to develop Ebola treatments are also looking for indemnity from governments or multilateral agencies to protect themselves from potential losses or claims related to their work. The issues is expected to be discussed today at a meeting in Geneva that will be chaired by World Health Organization Director-General Margaret Chan. "I think it is reasonable that there should be some level of indemnification because the vaccine is essentially being used in an emergency situation before we've all had the chance to confirm its absolute profile," said GlaxoSmithKline Chief Executive Andrew Witty to BBC radio. "That's a situation where we would look for some kind of indemnification, either from governments or from multilateral agencies." Read more on Ebola.

NIH: $31M in Grants to Enhance Diversity in the Biomedical Research Workforce
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has announced almost $31 in grants to enhance diversity in the biomedical research workforce. The grants are part of a larger five-year program to support more than 50 awardees and partnering institutions in establishing a national consortium to “develop, implement and evaluate approaches to encourage individuals to start and stay in biomedical research careers,” according to a release. “At the Department of Health and Human Services [HHS] we believe that delivering impact begins with building strong teams that have the talent and focus necessary to get results,” said HHS Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell. “These awards will leverage the power of our country’s diversity so that together, we can continue to advance biomedical research and unlock the cures to some of the great health challenges of our times.” Read more on research.

Study: Conflict at Home or School Affects Teens in Both
Conflict at home can lead to a teen experiencing a greater risk of problems at school for up to two days, while issues at school can also cause problems at home, according to a new study in the journal Child Development. In a study of more than 100 teens ages 13-17 and their parents, researchers also determined that bad moods and mental health symptoms such as depression and anxiety are factors in what’s known as the “spillover effect.” "Spillover processes have been recognized, but are not well understood," wrote Adela Timmons, a doctoral student, and Gayla Margolin, professor of psychology. "Evidence of spillover for as long as two days suggests that some teens get caught in a reverberating cycle of negative events.” The research could be used to help teens learn to better manage stress and difficult situations.  Read more on mental health.

Sep 29 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: September 29

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EBOLA UPDATE: NIH Admits Ebola-Exposed U.S. Physician for Treatment
(NewPublicHealth is monitoring the public health crisis in West Africa.)
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) yesterday admitted an Ebola-exposed U.S. physician for treatment at the NIH’s Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. The unidentified physician became exposed to the virus while volunteering in Sierra Leone; the NIH declined to comment on whether the physician had been infected. "When someone is exposed, you want to put them into the best possible situation so if something happens you can take care of them," said NIH infectious disease chief Anthony Fauci, MD, according to the Associated Press. Read more on Ebola.

Electronic Devices Can Keep Kids Up at Night, Should Be Out of Bedrooms
Almost three out of four U.S. children ages 6 to 17 sleep in a bedroom with at least one electronic device—and such children sleep an average of one fewer hour per night, according to Jill Creighton, MD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics Stony Brook Children’s Hospital. According to Creighton, backlit electronic devices such as tablets, smartphones and video games can interrupt sleep and keep people awake, making it important for parents to get their kids in electronics-free bedtime routines. “The hour before bed should be a no-electronics zone,” she said in a release. “The burst of light from a phone (even if it’s just to check the time) can break a sleep cycle. A regular alarm clock is best.” Read more on pediatrics.

Study: Kids as Young as 6 Can Already See Academic and Social Issues Due to ADHD
Children as young as 6 to 8 years old can experience academic problems and difficulty with social skills due to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which is exacerbated by the fact that approximately 80 percent of kids with ADHD symptoms have not been diagnosed with the disorder, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics. Researchers tested approximately 400 kids at 43 Australian schools, finding 179 with ADHD and 212 without; by following their academic careers, the researchers determined that by the second grade the kids with ADHD were more likely to be below-average in reading and mathematics, and to experience more difficulty connecting with their peers, indicating the need to identify and treat ADHD earlier. "Already at this stage, which is relatively young, it's very clear the children have important functional problems in every domain we registered," said study lead author Daryl Efron, MD, a developmental-behavioral pediatrician with the Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, according to HealthDay. "On every measure, we found the kids with ADHD were performing far poorer than the control children." Read more on mental health.

Sep 24 2014
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Football: Concussion Watch—Season Three

Frontline, the Public Broadcasting Service documentary series, has a unique football stats blog, Concussion Watch, which is now in its third year. The blog tallies—game by game—the number of National Football League (NFL) players sidelined by a possible concussion and how soon they return to play.

Based on tracking for the last two years, the blog predicts that 150 players will suffer concussions during the current season, which in many cases could lead to lifetime debilitating problems. This is despite new playing rules and ever-evolving helmets.

The impact of concussions on the players’ heath and lives is startling. Based on Concussion Watch data, 306 players have suffered a combined 323 concussions over the past two seasons. In half of the cases where a concussion occurs, players return to the field without having missed a single game. According to the blog, although there’s no standard recovery time for a diagnosed concussion, guidelines developed by the American Academy of Neurology and endorsed by the NFL Players Association indicate that athletes are at the greatest risk for repeat injury in the first 10 days after a concussion. And the more head injuries a person suffers, the more likely they may be to develop complications later on.

In fact, the NFL is due a decision by mid-October from thousands of league retirees on whether they will accept a proposed settlement in a class-action concussion case brought by more than 4,500 former players. Papers filed in the case show that the NFL expects more than thirty percent of all retired players to develop some form of long-term cognitive problem—such as Alzheimer’s disease or dementia—in their lifetime as a result of head injuries suffered during games. During the preseason and the first week of official play, 15 players suffered head injuries and 12 have already returned to their positions.

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Sep 23 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: September 23

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EBOLA UPDATE: 20,000 Cases by December Unless Significant Measures are Taken
(NewPublicHealth is monitoring the public health crisis in West Africa.)
More than 20,000 people could have been infected by Ebola by early November unless public health officials quickly enhance their control measures in West Africa, according to a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers from the World Health Organization (WHO) and Imperial College, London, reviewed data since the start of the outbreak, which they identified as December 2013. Between Dec. 30 and Sept. 14 a total of 4,507 cases were reported to the WHO. Read more on Ebola.

HHS: $99 Million to Improve Youth Mental Health Services
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has announced approximately $99 million in grants to improve mental health services for young people across the country. The grants include:

  • Approximately $34 million to train more than 4,000 new mental health providers, as well as expand and support Minority Fellowship Programs
  • Approximately $48 million to help teachers, schools and communities recognize and respond to potential youth mental health issues
  • Approximately $16.7 million to support 17 new Healthy Transitions grants, which will improve access to treatment and support services for people ages 16 to 25 that have or are at high risk of developing a serious mental health condition

Read more on mental health.

FDA: New Challenge to Develop Innovative Ways to Identify Foodborne Pathogens
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has announced a $500,000 challenge to encourage the creation of “breakthrough” and innovative solutions on how to find disease-causing, microbial pathogens—including Salmonella—in fresh produce. The 2014 FDA Food Safety Challenge was developed under the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010. “We are thrilled to announce the FDA’s first incentive prize competition under the America COMPETES Act,” said Michael Taylor, the FDA’s deputy commissioner for foods and veterinary medicine, in a release. “This is an exciting opportunity for the federal government to collaborate with outside experts to bring forth breakthrough ideas and technologies that can help ensure quicker detection of problems in our food supply and help prevent foodborne illnesses.” According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately one in six Americans are sickened by foodborne illness each year, leading to approximately 3,000 deaths. Read more on food safety.

Aug 27 2014
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On the Ball: Promoting the Need for Concussion Prevention in Youth Sports

The start of the school year also means a return to team sports. There’s no question that playing a team sport provides clear benefits for kids, including the opportunity to develop physical fitness and other healthy habits, good sportsmanship, self-esteem and self-discipline. Kids who play sports are also less likely to engage in risky behaviors such as smoking or substance abuse.

But there is a potential dark side: An increased risk of sports-related injuries, with concussions at the top of the list of current concerns. Each year nearly 250,000 kids go to emergency departments for suspected sports-related concussions and there’s growing recognition that continuing to play with a concussion can lead to long-term effects on the brain, especially for kids. Girls also now have a higher rate of sports-related concussions than do boys, according to the Children’s Safety Network.

Because of all of these reasons there’s a major push underway to prevent concussions in all youth sports, not just in football, since concussions also commonly occur in girls’ and boys’ soccer, lacrosse, basketball and other sports, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. In May, the White House hosted the first-ever Healthy Kids & Safe Sports Concussion Summit to promote and expand research on sports-related concussions among kids and raise awareness of steps that can be taken to help prevent, identify and respond to concussions in young athletes.

Meanwhile, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched the Heads Up: Concussion in High School Sports initiative to help coaches, athletes and parents take steps to prevent concussions and respond appropriately if they occur. Among the prevention measures being introduced are modifications to protective gear (including new helmet technology for various sports), rule changes (such as limits on heading drills in soccer practices and tackling drills in football), identifying athletes who are at risk (by looking for genetic markers of risk) and educating everyone involved with youth sports about the dangers of concussions.

There are also stricter guidelines about when it’s appropriate for athletes to return to play after a concussion, based on their physical and cognitive symptoms; concussion history; and adherence to a step-by-step process for returning to the field or court. The CDC now recommends that coaches and parents consider whether their league or school should conduct baseline testing—a pre-season exam to assess an athlete’s balance and brain function—so that if a concussion is suspected to have occurred, the baseline results can help establish the extent of the head injury.

“Players, coaches and parents are demanding that we find a way to reduce concussion risk in sports,” said Michael Sims, head athletic trainer for football at Baylor University and a board member of the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment. “But equipment can’t do it alone. It’s critical that safe play and return to play practices are enforced.”

Aug 27 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: August 27

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EBOLA UPDATE: Roundup of the Latest News Out of West Africa
(NewPublicHealth is monitoring the public health crisis in West Africa.)
As the death toll continues to rise, here’s a look at some of the latest news on the ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

Read more on Ebola.

Study: Significant Time Spent Playing Violent Video Games Increases the Risk for Depression in Kids
Significant time spent playing violent video games is linked to a greater risk for depression in preadolescent youth, according to a new study in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking. Researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) examined 5,147 fifth grade students in three major cities and found that kids who play such games for more than two hours per day showed significantly more depression symptoms, including lack of pleasure, lack of interest in activities, concentration difficulties, low energy, low self-worth and suicidal ideation over the past year. “Previous studies have observed how aggression relates to video games, but this is the first to examine the relationship between daily violent video game exposure and depression,” said Susan Tortolero, PhD, principal investigator and director of the Prevention Research Center at the UTHealth School of Public Health, in a release. Read more on mental health.

WHO Calls for Stronger Regulation of E-Cigarettes
The World Health Organization (WHO) has joined the American Heart Association and other organizations in calling for stronger regulation of e-cigarettes, which are a $3 billion worldwide industry. WHO is now recommending that their indoor use be banned until they are proven harmless to bystanders; the international health organization is also calling for its 194 member states to ban the sale of e-cigarettes to minors, as well as to ban or minimize their advertising. According to the agency, regulation "is a necessary precondition for establishing a scientific basis on which to judge the effects of their use, and for ensuring that adequate research is conducted and the public health is protected and people made aware of the potential risks and benefits." Read more on tobacco.

Aug 22 2014
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Shining a Spotlight on Teen Mental Health Issues

This week, NewPublicHealth will run a series on new and creative public health campaigns that aim to improve the health of communities across the country through the use of public service announcements, infographics and more. Stay tuned to learn more about a new campaign each day.

Mood changes often come with the territory of being a teenager, making it difficult sometimes to distinguish run-of-the-mill angst or feelings of sadness from symptoms that may signal a mental health condition. That’s why the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene recently launched a public service advertisement (PSA) called “Open Up, Be Heard”, with the goal of encouraging teens and young adults to turn to a trusted adult for help with their emotional problems.

Featuring former New York Knick Metta World Peace—who has gone public about his own challenges with managing his emotions—the spot aims to reduce the stigma regarding mental health issues. Promoted on social media as well as the health department’s NYC Teen page, the spot directs viewers to free online resources and personal stories from teens who’ve grappled with depression, anger, stress, suicidal thoughts and other challenges.

“It is critical that young people know it’s OK to reach out for help with emotional issues,” said New York City Health Commissioner Mary Bassett, MD. “By speaking openly about his experience, Metta World Peace is an example for young people who are afraid of talking about their problems. We are so grateful to him for committing his time and insight to this important issue.”

The spot is much needed, given that 27 percent of public high school students in New York City reported they felt sad or hopeless every day for two or more weeks sometime in the previous year, according to the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In addition, 15 percent of the city’s public high school students reported intentionally hurting themselves (by cutting or burning themselves, for instance) and 8 percent said they had attempted suicide.

Read more

Jul 22 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: July 22

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Study: Low-income Teens in Better High Schools Engage in Fewer Risky Behaviors
Low-income teenagers attending “high-performing” high schools are less likely than their peers in lower-performing schools to engage in risky behaviors such as carrying a weapon, binge drinking, using drugs other than marijuana and having multiple sex partners, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics. Researchers analyzed 521 students who were accepted into a high-performing charter school; when compared to 409 students who also applied to top charter schools but were not selected in a random lottery, the kids in the high-performing schools were less likely to engage in at least one of the identified “very risky” behaviors—36 percent, compared to 42 percent. There was no statistical difference for more common risky behaviors, such as lighter drinking and smoking cigarettes. Read more on education.

Too Few People At Risk for Heart Disease are Receiving Recommendations for Aspirin Therapy
Despite the important role it can play in preventing heart disease, only 40 percent of the people who are at high risk of cardiovascular disease reported receiving a doctor’s recommendation for aspirin therapy, according to a new study in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Approximately one-quarter of people at low risk received the recommendation. “Cardiovascular disease is a significant problem in the United States and the appropriate use of prevention strategies is particularly important,” said Arch G. Mainous III, PhD, the study’s lead investigator and chairman of the department of health services research, management and policy at the University of Florida’s College of Public Health and Health Professions, in a release. “Aspirin has been advocated as a prevention strategy but only for certain patients. There are health risks associated with the treatment. It is important that doctors are directing the right patients to get aspirin for cardiovascular disease prevention.” The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends aspirin use to prevent heart attack and stroke in men ages 45-79 and women ages 55-79. Read more on heart health.

Study: Coping Skills Programs for Mothers of Children With Autism Helps All Involved
Mothers of children with autism who participated in coping skills programs saw reduced stress, illness and psychiatric problems—all of which they are at higher risk for—while also improving their connections with their children, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics. Such programs also benefit their children, as these risk factors are associated with poorer health outcomes for the children. Researchers entered 243 mothers of children with disabilities (two-thirds of which were autism) into six weeks of either Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (mindfulness practice) or Positive Adult Development (positive psychology practice), finding that both reduced stress and other negative impacts. Read more on mental health.

Jul 21 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: July 21

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Strokes Fall Among Older Americans
Fewer older Americans are having strokes and those who do have a lower risk of dying from them, according to researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The study, published in JAMA, followed close to 15,000 stroke-free patients ages 45 to 64, beginning in the 1980s and ending in 2011. It found a 24 percent overall decline in first-time strokes in each of the last two decades and a 20 percent overall drop per decade in deaths after stroke. However, the decline was found mainly in people over age 65, with little progress in reducing the risk of strokes among younger people. The researchers say the decrease in stroke incidence and mortality is partly due to more successful control of risk factors such as blood pressure, smoking cessation and use of statin medications for controlling cholesterol, but that more efforts are needed to reduce strokes in younger people, including reducing obesity and diabetes and increasing physical activity. Read more on mortality.

Study: Insufficient Sleep Can Harm Memory
Lack of sleep, currently considered a public health epidemic in the United States, can also lead to errors in memory, according to a new study in Psychological Science. The study found that participants who didn’t get a full night’s sleep were more likely to make mistakes on the details of a simulated burglary they were shown in a series of images. “We found memory distortion is greater after sleep deprivation,” said Kimberly Fenn, an associate professor of psychology at Michigan State University and a co-investigator of the study. “And people are getting less sleep each night than they ever have.” The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has linked the insufficient sleep epidemic to car crashes, industrial disasters and chronic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. Read more on mental health.

New EPA Graphic Will Give Consumers More Information on Insect Repellent Products

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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently released a new graphic design available for use by insect repellent makers to more easily show how long the product is effective. “We are working to create a system that does for bug repellents what SPF labeling did for sunscreens,” said Jim Jones, Assistant Administrator of the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention. “By providing vital information to consumers, this new graphic will help parents, hikers and the general public better protect themselves and their families from serious health threats caused by mosquitoes and ticks.” The release of the graphic design was accompanied by a joint statement from the EPA and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) urging the public to use insect repellents and take other precautions to avoid biting insects that carry serious diseases, including Lyme and West Nile virus. Incidence of insect-borne diseases is on the rise, according to the CDC. In order to place the new graphic on their labels, manufacturers must submit a label amendment, including test results on effectiveness. The public could see the graphic on repellent products early next year. Read more on infectious disease.