Category Archives: Nursing

Jun 17 2014
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In the Media: Summer Reading

This is part of the June 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Nurse history buffs have two new titles to choose from this summer reading season.

In Nurses and Midwives in Nazi Germany: The“Euthanasia Programs,” Susan C. Benedict, CRNA, PhD, FAAN, professor of nursing and ethics at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, tells the harrowing tale of how ethics in nursing and midwifery were abrogated during the Nazi era. Edited by Benedict and Linda Shields, MD, PhD, BSN, professor of nursing at James Cook University in Australia, the book was published in April.

Another new history book, by author Mary Cronk Farrell, tells a heroic story of nursing during World War II. Released in February and targeted at young readers, Pure Grit: How American World War II Nurses Survived Battle and Prison Camp in the Pacific, tells the inspiring story of American Army and Navy nurses serving in the Philippines who survived three years as prisoners of war.

The bookshelves are also offering a host of new nursing memoirs, including Duty Shoes: A Nurse’s Memoir, by Camille Foshee-Mason, RN; The Last Visit: Reflections of a Hospice Nurse, by Margaret Pecoraro Dodson, RN; and Whose Death Is It, Anyway?: A Hospice Nurse Remembers, by Sharon White, RN, BSN. 

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Jun 17 2014
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Recent Research About Nursing, June 2014

This is part of the June 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Research Compares Nurse and Physician Prescription Practices

A newly published systematic review of more than four decades of research on nurse prescribing finds that in the U.S. states and foreign countries in which nurses are allowed to prescribe, their prescription practices are similar to those of physicians, but their patients report higher satisfaction with their care and are more likely to return for follow-up visits.

The review was conducted by a team of researchers in the Netherlands—one of several countries in which nurses may prescribe. The team screened all studies they could find on the subject dating back to 1974, finally identifying 35 studies that met their criteria, including 13 from the United States, 12 from the United Kingdom, five from the Netherlands, two from Canada, two from Norway, and one from Colombia. The studies’ methods and specific topics varied, but the team conducting the review identified a number of trends in the research. They wrote:

  • “Our findings suggest that nurses prescribe for a wide range of patients and in comparable ways to physicians. Overall, nurses appear to prescribe for just as many patients as physicians do, nurses prescribe comparable numbers of medicines per patient visit and there appear to be few differences between nurses and physicians in the type and dose of medication prescribed and in clinical outcomes.

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Jun 13 2014
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Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Advocates for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services

Yolanda Ogbolu, Ph.D., CRNP, is an assistant professor of family and community health and deputy director at the Office of Global Health at the University of Maryland-Baltimore. She is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholar (2013-2016).

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Human Capital Blog: Congratulations on your recent Outstanding Faculty Award from the University of Maryland-Baltimore! What does it mean for you and for your career?

Yolanda Ogbolu: It was an honor to be recognized by the University of Maryland-Baltimore (UMB) and by my colleagues in the school of nursing who nominated me for this award. It specifically identifies a faculty member on campus who has demonstrated achievements in the area of diversity and inclusiveness. It is presented in the annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Black History Month celebration.

Having my colleagues share and honor my passion for addressing health inequities using the social determinants of health model locally and globally was particularly rewarding, as I reflected on the work of Dr. King and others before me. At the same time, I acknowledge that most of my work benefitted from my passion for collaboration. Therefore, I wholeheartedly shared the award with many people who have assisted me along this path. Receiving the award has strengthened my career and enthusiasm for actively engaging in efforts that move forward the ideals of social justice and health equity in a way that transforms practice and patient outcomes in my local and global communities.

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Jun 5 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Diversity in the nursing workforce, barriers to breast-feeding, child maltreatment, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

HealthLeaders Media features New Careers in Nursing (NCIN), a joint initiative of RWJF and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) that is increasing diversity in the nursing workforce. “The reason [increasing diversity] is important, of course, is because the population of nursing does not really reflect the population at large,” Polly Bednash, PhD, RN, FAAN, says in the story. “We are now working very aggressively to have the number of people entering the profession look more like the population of the United States.” Bednash is NCIN program director and AACN’s CEO.

In an opinion piece for the Philadelphia Inquirer, Jooyoung Lee, PhD, writes that, in the aftermath of mass shootings, the media and public often focus chiefly on the shooters and forget about the families of those slain. “Instead of fixating on the shooter, or retreating into our own lives, let’s remember and honor those who are left behind. Their lives are often difficult and grinding; their grief is immeasurable. Healing from murder is rarely—if ever—a quick or complete process,” writes Lee, an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus. Read more about Lee’s work.

Living in neighborhoods with high rates of violence can affect students’ academic performance, according to a study from RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus from Patrick Sharkey, PhD. The Washington Post reports that the study found that neighborhood violence that occurred within seven days of a test appeared to reduce Black children’s performance on language arts assessments. “When violence is in the air, when the threat of violence is in the air, then it becomes something that spills over to affect not just people who are involved, but everyone who lives in the community,” Sharkey says.

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Jun 3 2014
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CDC Study: Nurses, Physician Assistants More Likely to Provide Education in Chronic Disease Management than Doctors

Proper patient management of chronic diseases is increasingly important to the nation’s health care system, as the Baby Boom generation reaches the stage of life where such conditions are common. From diabetes, arthritis, and asthma to obesity, hypertension, and depression, the health care system is looking to train patients to take steps mapped out for them in discussions with their health care providers. A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), however, finds that a minority of patients with chronic conditions receive education in managing their problems, and that some practitioners—nurses and physician assistants (PAs), in particular—are considerably more likely to provide such education than others.

“Disease self-management is an essential component of care for patients with most chronic conditions,” writes a team of researchers led by Tamara S. Ritsema, MPH, MMSc, PA-C. “Patients cannot perform daily self-management tasks if they have poor understanding of the disease process, medications used, or the practical tasks they need to accomplish to care for themselves. Health education is, therefore, a vital preventive element in the patient visit.”

The researchers examined five years of CDC data, accounting for more than 136,000 patients who had been diagnosed with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), depression, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, or obesity. The records indicated whether the patients’ doctors, nurse practitioners (NPs), or PAs had provided education to the patients in the self-management of their conditions during each visit. 

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Jun 2 2014
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Building a National Resource Center for HIV Prevention from the Ground Up

Ann H. Cary, PhD, MPH, RN, is dean and professor at the School of Nursing and Health Studies at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. She was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellow from 2008 to 2011.

Ann Cary

Human Capital Blog: Congratulations on the grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to support the creation of a national resource center for HIV prevention at the School of Nursing and Health Studies at the University of Missouri-Kansas City! What will your role be at the center?

Ann H. Cary: My role is to ensure that the new center has the institutional resources it needs to succeed. This translates into procuring space reallocation and furnishings; supporting personnel hires; consulting with the CDC grant leadership team to remove organizational barriers; assisting in solving any challenges to the center’s rollout; and telling the story about this project through institutional messaging to our community, the discipline of nursing, and to other stakeholders and partners.

HCB: What is your vision for the center?

Cary: That the National HIV Prevention Coordinating Resource Center grant results in a center that leads and coordinates products for providers and the communities they serve to ultimately improve the prevention and treatment of  people living with, or at risk of, acquiring HIV.

HCB: The center will be housed at a school of nursing and health studies. Why is that important?

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May 30 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The May 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the May issue.

Nursing Job Outlook Sunny

Nursing graduates can take heart from long-term projections that show they have one of the hottest degrees around. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that more than half a million positions for registered nurses (RNs) will open between 2012 and 2022. An additional 525,000 nurses will be needed to replace those leaving the field. However, experts say that regional variations in employment opportunities for nurses should be expected. The outlook is especially good for nurses with bachelor’s degrees in nursing (BSNs) and higher.

Study: Nursing School Diversity Initiatives Mostly Successful

Do “pipeline programs” aimed at increasing student diversity in nursing schools actually work? The answer is ‘Yes...but,’ according to a study led by J. Margo Brooks Carthon, PhD, APRN, an alumnus of the RWJF New Connections program and an RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholar. Her study found that significantly more Latino and Asian students enrolled in nursing schools with pipeline programs than without, but enrollment among Native American and Alaskan Indian students decreased at pipeline schools.

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May 27 2014
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52 Schools of Nursing to Provide 400 Scholarships Through RWJF’s New Careers in Nursing Program

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) today announced awards to 52 schools of nursing that will comprise the final cohort of its prestigious New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program (NCIN). In the upcoming academic year, the schools will use these grants to support traditionally underrepresented students who are making a career switch to nursing through an accelerated baccalaureate or master’s degree program. NCIN is a program of RWJF and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

Each NCIN Scholar has already earned a bachelor’s degree in another field, and is making a transition to nursing through an accelerated nursing degree program, which prepares students to assume the role of  registered nurse in as little as 12-18 months.

In addition to a $10,000 scholarship, NCIN scholars receive other support to help them meet the demands of an accelerated degree program. All NCIN grantee schools maintain leadership and mentoring programs for their scholars, as well as a pre-entry immersion program to help them succeed.

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May 27 2014
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When It Comes to Cost and Quality of Hospital Care, Nurse Tenure and Teamwork Count

The largest study to examine the relationship between nurse staffing and patient care reveals that patients get the best care when they are treated in hospital units staffed by teams of nurses who have extensive experience in their current jobs. The study, conducted by an interdisciplinary team including Patricia Stone, PhD, RN, FAAN, Centennial Professor of Health Policy at the Columbia University School of Nursing and Ciaran Phibbs, PhD, research economist at the Health Economics Resource Center at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Health Care System, was funded by the Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative (INQRI).

The research team reviewed more than 900,000 patient admissions over four years (from 2003 through 2006) at hospitals in the Veterans Administration Health Care System. They analyzed nurses’ payroll records and patients’ medical records to see how nurse staffing affected patients’ length of stay. Longer hospital stays tend to be associated with delays and errors in care delivery, so shorter stays indicate better care. Shorter stays also reduce the cost of care.

Researchers found that a one-year increase in the average tenure of registered nurses (RNs) on a hospital unit was associated with a 1.3 percent decrease in the average length of stay.

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May 22 2014
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New Survey: In an Evolving Profession, Nurses Are Satisfied and Staying the Course

Change may be a constant for nurses today, but that hasn’t discouraged their commitment to the profession, according to a new study from the human resources company CareerBuilder. Nursing remains a rewarding and satisfying career field for the vast majority who enter it, with 93 percent of nurses surveyed reporting that they are satisfied with being a nurse, and 85 percent reporting that they are unlikely to switch careers.

The nationwide survey of nearly 900 nurses, conducted in March by Harris Poll, focused on changes in the nursing profession, differences in nursing settings, the value of various training and education programs, and desired career paths.

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